Results for 'Daniel W. Aristotle'

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  1.  39
    Physics.Daniel W. Aristotle & Graham - 2018 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    The _Physics_ is a foundational work of western philosophy, and the crucial one for understanding Aristotle's views on matter, form, essence, causation, movement, space, and time. This richly annotated, scrupulously accurate, and consistent translation makes it available to a contemporary English reader as no other does—in part because it fits together seamlessly with other closely associated works in the New Hackett Aristotle series, such as the _Metaphysics_, _De Anima_, and forthcoming _De Caelo_ and _On Coming to Be and (...)
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  2.  32
    Aristotle’s Definition of Motion.Daniel W. Graham - 1988 - Ancient Philosophy 8 (2):209-215.
  3.  86
    States and performances: Aristotle's test.Daniel W. Graham - 1980 - Philosophical Quarterly 30 (119):117-130.
  4.  87
    Aristotle’s Two Systems.Daniel W. Graham - 1987 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Each of the two major approaches to Aristotle--the unitarian, which understands his work as forming a single, unified system, and the developmentalist, which seeks a sequence of developing ideas--has inherent limitations. This book proposes a synthetic view of Aristotle that sees development as a change between systematic theories. Setting theories of the so-called logical works beside theories of the physical and metaphysical treatises, Graham shows that Aristotle's doctrines fall into two distinct systems of philosophies that are genetically (...)
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  5.  39
    Leucippus's atomism.Daniel W. Graham - 2008 - In Patricia Curd & Daniel Graham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Presocratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press USA.
    The founder of atomic theory, according to Aristotle and Theophrastus, is Leucippus. His very existence has been called into question. Three of the best minds of nineteenth-century scholarship were embroiled in a vehement debate on this question, which thereupon became a cause célèbre, with scholars weighing in on both sides for the next half century. Ultimately this debate seems to have ended in stalemate and exhaustion rather than in any clear-cut decision. After briefly reviewing the debate, this article argues (...)
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  6. Aristotle’s Definition of Motion.Daniel W. Graham - 1988 - Ancient Philosophy 8 (2):209-215.
  7. The Pure Form of Time and the Powers of the False.Daniel W. Smith - 2019 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 81 (1):29-51.
    This paper explores the relation of the theory of time and the theory of truth in Deleuze’s philosophy. According to Deleuze, a mutation in our conception of time occurred with Kant. In antiquity, time had been subordinated to movement, it was the measure or the “number of movement” (Aristotle). In Kant, this relation is inverted: time is no longer subordinated to movement but assumes an independence and autonomy of its own for the first time. In Deleuze’s phrasing, time becomes (...)
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  8.  35
    Aristotle Physics Book Viii.Daniel W. Graham (ed.) - 1999 - Clarendon Press.
    Daniel Graham offers a clear, accurate new translation of the eighth book of Aristotle's Physics, accompanied by a careful philosophical commentary to guide the reader towards understanding of this key text in the history of Western thought. It is the culmination of Aristotle's theory of nature: he explains motion in the universe in terms of a single source and regulating principle, a first `unmoved mover'.
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  9.  42
    Aristotle’s Discovery of Matter.Daniel W. Graham - 1984 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 66 (1):37-51.
  10. Aristotle's reading of Plato.Daniel W. Graham - 2004 - In Jorge J. E. Gracia & Jiyuan Yu (eds.), Uses and abuses of the classics: Western interpretations of Greek philosophy. Burlington, VT: Ashgate.
  11.  44
    The Order of Nature in Aristotle’s Physics: Place and the Elements.Daniel W. Graham - 2001 - Mind 110 (440):1084-1087.
  12.  11
    Aristotle's Two Systems.Daniel W. Graham - 1987 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    In this study, Daniel W. Graham addresses two major problems in interpreting Aristotle. First, should we reconcile the apparent inconsistencies of the corpus by assuming an underlying unity of doctrine, or by positing a sequence of developing ideas? Secondly,what is the relation between the so-called logical works on the one hand and the physical-metaphysical treatises on the other? Although the problems appear to be unrelated, Graham finds that the key to the first lies in the second, and in (...)
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  13.  24
    Some myths about Aristotle's biological motivation.Daniel W. Graham - 1986 - Journal of the History of Ideas 47 (4):529.
  14.  74
    The Development of Aristotle’s Concept of Actuality.Daniel W. Graham - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (2):551-564.
  15.  25
    The Development of Aristotle’s Concept of Actuality: Comments on a Reconstruction by Stephen Menn.Daniel W. Graham - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (2):551-564.
  16. An externalist teleology.Gunnar Babcock & Daniel W. McShea - 2021 - Synthese 199 (3-4):8755-8780.
    Teleology has a complicated history in the biological sciences. Some have argued that Darwin’s theory has allowed biology to purge itself of teleological explanations. Others have been content to retain teleology and to treat it as metaphorical, or have sought to replace it with less problematic notions like teleonomy. And still others have tried to naturalize it in a way that distances it from the vitalism of the nineteenth century, focusing on the role that function plays in teleological explanation. No (...)
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  17.  36
    Aristotle's Two Systems.Cass Weller & Daniel W. Graham - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (2):324.
  18.  56
    De Haas, Mansfeld Aristotle's On Generation and Corruption, Book I: Symposium Aristotelicum. Pp. x + 347. Oxford: Clarendon Press. Cased. £45. ISBN: 0-19-924292-5. [REVIEW]Daniel W. Graham - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (1):63-65.
  19.  53
    Deleuze and Time.Robert W. Luzecky & Daniel W. Smith (eds.) - 2023 - Edinburgh, UK: Edinburgh University Press.
    Deleuze and Time is a multi-disciplinary analysis of Deleuze’s theory of temporality -/- In this collection, leading international scholars elaborate on Deleuze’s modification of the thought of historical figures, from the ancients - Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Lucretius - through to the moderns – Spinoza Kant, Husserl, Nietzsche, Bergson, Simondon, Negri - as well as his use of scientific fields such as complexity theory and thermodynamics. -/- The book shows that the philosophy of time was central to the development of (...)
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  20.  19
    Earth, Wind, and Fire: Aristotle on Violent Storm Events, with Reconsideration of the Terms ἐκνεφίας, τυφῶν, κεραυνός, and πρηστήρ.Michael Williams, Zachary Herzog & Daniel W. Graham - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (3):417-442.
    Recent studies of Aristotle’s meteorology have often focused on questions of scientific methodology rather than on the empirical accuracy of the explanations. Here we wish to focus on Aristotle’s theory of storms, considering them in their historical context and in light of Aristotle’s theoretical commitments, but testing them in terms of their ability to explain the phenomena in question. Aristotle’s approach to storm events follows a general pattern of “outburst” theories proposed by Presocratic thinkers, in which (...)
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  21.  29
    Hans-Georg Gadamer. Heidegger's Ways. John W. Stanley trs. Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 1994, 211pp. he. 0-7914-1738-7. Edward Goodell. The Nobel Philoso. [REVIEW]Georgios Anagnostopoulos Aristotle, Daniel Bonevac & Stephen Phillips - 1994 - Teaching Philosophy 1:7.
  22. Althusser, Louis. Machievelli and Us. Ed. François Matheron. Verso, 1999. pp. 136. $30.00 cloth. Angus, Ian.(Dis) figurations: Discourse/Critique/Ethics. Verso, 2000. pp. 269. $20 paper. Aristotle. Nicomachean Ethics, Books VIII and IX. Ed. Michael Pakaluk. [REVIEW]Ramón J. Betanzos, M. Martin, Roy Bhaskar, James Bohman, Finn Bowring, Stephen Eric Bronner, Allen Buchanan, Dan W. Brock, Morman Daniels & Daniel Wikler - 2001 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (1):115-122.
     
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  23.  30
    Alexander of Aphrodisias - R. W. Sharples (tr.): Alexander of Aphrodisias, Quaestiones 2.16–3.15. (Ancient Commentators on Aristotle.) Pp. 212. London: Duckworth, 1994. Cased.Daniel H. Frank - 1996 - The Classical Review 46 (2):235-236.
  24.  22
    Deborah K. W. Modrak, "Aristotle. The Power of Perception". [REVIEW]Daniel H. Frank - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (4):608.
  25. André Leroi-Gourhan.Daniel W. Smith - 2019 - In Graham Jones & Jon Roffe (eds.), Deleluze's Philosophical Lineage II. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. pp. 255-274.
  26.  22
    Biology’s First Law: The Tendency for Diversity and Complexity to Increase in Evolutionary Systems.Daniel W. McShea & Robert N. Brandon - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    1 The Zero-Force Evolutionary Law 2 Randomness, Hierarchy, and Constraint 3 Diversity 4 Complexity 5 Evidence, Predictions, and Tests 6 Philosophical Foundations 7 Implications.
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  27.  34
    A New Aristotle Reader Edited by J. L. Ackrill Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987, xiv + 580 pp., £35.00 - Aristotle's Two Systems By Daniel W. Graham Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987, xv + 359 pp., £35.00 - Aristotle: The Desire to Understand By Jonathan Lear Cambridge University Press, 1988, xi + 328 pp., £27.50, £8.95 paper - Aristotle Today Edited by Mohan Matthen Edmonton: Academic Printing and Publishing, 1987, viii + 196 pp., $34.95, $18.95 paper. [REVIEW]D. W. Hamlyn - 1989 - Philosophy 64 (248):261-.
  28.  20
    Agent-Centered Morality: An Aristotelian Alternative to Kantian Internalism (review).Daniel E. Palmer - 2000 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (3):449-451.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Agent-Centered Morality: An Aristotelian Alternative to Kantian InternalismDaniel E. PalmerGeorge W. Harris. Agent-Centered Morality: An Aristotelian Alternative to Kantian Internalism. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999. Pp. xi + 434. Cloth, $60.00.Contemporary philosophers have found substantial resources in the ethical writings of both Aristotle and Kant. Together Aristotelian-inspired virtue ethics and Kantian constructivism have not only contributed greatly to the resurgence of interest in normative theory in (...)
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  29. Essays on Deleuze.Daniel W. Smith - 2012 - Edinburgh University Press.
    Gilles Deleuze was one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth-century, and Smith is widely recognized to be one of his most penetrating interpreters, as well as an important philosophical voice in his own right. Combining his most important pieces over the last fifteen years along with two new essays, this book is Smith 's definitive treatise on Deleuze. The essays are divided into four sections, which cover Deleuze's use of the history of philosophy, an overview of his philosophical (...)
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  30.  8
    Nietzsche and the Political.Daniel W. Conway - 1996 - New York: Routledge.
    In this study Daniel Conway shows how Nietzsche's political thinking bears a closer resemblance to the conservative republicanism of his predecessors than to the progressive liberalism of his contemporaries. The key contemporary figures such as Habermas, Foucault, McIntyre, Rorty and Rawls are also examined in the light of Nietzsche's political legacy. _Nietzsche and the Political___ also draws out important implications for contemporary liberalism and feminist thought, above all showing Nietzsche's continuing relevance to the shape of political thinking today.
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  31. Corporate social performance as a competitive advantage in attracting a quality workforce.Daniel W. Greening & Daniel B. Turban - 2000 - Business and Society 39 (3):254-280.
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  32.  47
    Heraclitus.Daniel W. Graham - 2002 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  33. Complexity and evolution: What everybody knows.Daniel W. McShea - 1991 - Biology and Philosophy 6 (3):303-324.
    The consensus among evolutionists seems to be that the morphological complexity of organisms increases in evolution, although almost no empirical evidence for such a trend exists. Most studies of complexity have been theoretical, and the few empirical studies have not, with the exception of certain recent ones, been especially rigorous; reviews are presented of both the theoretical and empirical literature. The paucity of evidence raises the question of what sustains the consensus, and a number of suggestions are offered, including the (...)
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  34. Semantics without semantic content.Daniel W. Harris - 2020 - Mind and Language 37 (3):304-328.
    I argue that semantics is the study of the proprietary database of a centrally inaccessible and informationally encapsulated input–output system. This system’s role is to encode and decode partial and defeasible evidence of what speakers are saying. Since information about nonlinguistic context is therefore outside the purview of semantic processing, a sentence’s semantic value is not its content but a partial and defeasible constraint on what it can be used to say. I show how to translate this thesis into a (...)
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  35. Upper-directed systems: a new approach to teleology in biology.Daniel W. McShea - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (5):663-684.
    How shall we understand apparently teleological systems? What explains their persistence and their plasticity? Here I argue that all seemingly goal-directed systems—e.g., a food-seeking organism, human-made devices like thermostats and torpedoes, biological development, human goal seeking, and the evolutionary process itself—share a common organization. Specifically, they consist of an entity that moves within a larger containing structure, one that directs its behavior in a general way without precisely determining it. If so, then teleology lies within the domain of the theory (...)
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  36. The texts of early Greek philosophy: the complete fragments and selected testimonies of the major presocratics.Daniel W. Graham (ed.) - 2010 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This two-part volume collects the complete fragments and most important testimonies for the leading presocratic philosophers. The Greek and Latin texts are translated on facing pages and accompanied by a brief commentary for each philosopher.
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  37. Speech Acts: The Contemporary Theoretical Landscape.Daniel W. Harris, Daniel Fogal & Matt Moss - 2018 - In Daniel Fogal, Daniel W. Harris & Matt Moss (eds.), New Work on Speech Acts. Oxford University Press.
    What makes it the case that an utterance constitutes an illocutionary act of a given kind? This is the central question of speech-act theory. Answers to it—i.e., theories of speech acts—have proliferated. Our main goal in this chapter is to clarify the logical space into which these different theories fit. -/- We begin, in Section 1, by dividing theories of speech acts into five families, each distinguished from the others by its account of the key ingredients in illocutionary acts. Are (...)
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  38. There Is No Techno-Responsibility Gap.Daniel W. Tigard - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 34 (3):589-607.
    In a landmark essay, Andreas Matthias claimed that current developments in autonomous, artificially intelligent systems are creating a so-called responsibility gap, which is allegedly ever-widening and stands to undermine both the moral and legal frameworks of our society. But how severe is the threat posed by emerging technologies? In fact, a great number of authors have indicated that the fear is thoroughly instilled. The most pessimistic are calling for a drastic scaling-back or complete moratorium on AI systems, while the optimists (...)
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  39.  75
    Nietzsche's On the genealogy of morals: a reader's guide.Daniel W. Conway - 2008 - New York: Continuum.
    In Nietzsche's "On the Genealogy of Morals": A Reader's Guide, Daniel Conway explains the philosophical background against which the book was written, the wider context of Western morality in general and the key themes and topics inherent ...
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  40.  71
    Heraclitus.Daniel W. Graham - 2019 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  41. Intentionalism and Bald-Faced Lies.Daniel W. Harris - 2020 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    In Lying and Insincerity, Andreas Stokke argues that bald-faced lies are genuine lies, and that lies are always assertions. Since bald-faced lies seem not to be aimed at convincing addressees of their contents, Stokke concludes that assertions needn’t have this aim. This conflicts with a traditional version of intentionalism, originally due to Grice, on which asserting something is a matter of communicatively intending for one’s addressee to believe it. I argue that Stokke’s own account of bald-faced lies faces serious problems (...)
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  42.  61
    Artificial Moral Responsibility: How We Can and Cannot Hold Machines Responsible.Daniel W. Tigard - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (3):435-447.
    Our ability to locate moral responsibility is often thought to be a necessary condition for conducting morally permissible medical practice, engaging in a just war, and other high-stakes endeavors. Yet, with increasing reliance upon artificially intelligent systems, we may be facing a wideningresponsibility gap, which, some argue, cannot be bridged by traditional concepts of responsibility. How then, if at all, can we make use of crucial emerging technologies? According to Colin Allen and Wendell Wallach, the advent of so-called ‘artificial moral (...)
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  43. Imperative Inference and Practical Rationality.Daniel W. Harris - 2021 - Philosophical Studies (4):1065-1090.
    Some arguments include imperative clauses. For example: ‘Buy me a drink; you can’t buy me that drink unless you go to the bar; so, go to the bar!’ How should we build a logic that predicts which of these arguments are good? Because imperatives aren’t truth apt and so don’t stand in relations of truth preservation, this technical question gives rise to a foundational one: What would be the subject matter of this logic? I argue that declaratives are used to (...)
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  44. The Concept of Sense in Gilles Deleuze's Logic of Sense.Daniel W. Smith - 2022 - Deleuze and Guattari Studies 16 (1):3-23.
    What is the concept of sense developed by Deleuze in his 1969 Logic of Sense? This paper attempts to answer this question analysing the three dimensions of language that Deleuze isolates: the primary order of noises and intensities ; the secondary order of sense ; and the tertiary organisation of propositions. What renders language possible is that which separates sounds from bodies and organises them into propositions, freeing them for the expressive function. Deleuze argues that it is the dimension of (...)
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  45.  33
    The Invention of Modern Science (translation).Daniel W. Smith & Isabelle Stengers (eds.) - 2000 - Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
    "The Invention of Modern Science proposes a fruitful way of going beyond the apparently irreconcilable positions, that science is either "objective" or "socially constructed." Instead, suggests Isabelle Stengers, one of the most important and influential philosophers of science in Europe, we might understand the tension between scientific objectivity and belief as a necessary part of science, central to the practices invented and reinvented by scientists."--pub. desc.
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  46.  15
    Local Knowledge, Environmental Politics, and the Founding of Ecology in the United States: Stephen Forbes and "The Lake as a Microcosm".Daniel W. Schneider - 2000 - Isis 91 (4):681-705.
  47. Deleuze and the Question of Desire: Toward an Immanent Theory of Ethics.Daniel W. Smith - 2007 - Parrhesia 2:66-78.
  48.  67
    Nietzsche and the political.Daniel W. Conway - 1996 - New York: Routledge.
    Contrary to much recent opinion, Daniel Conway argues that Nietzsche's political thinking is fully consistent with his diagnosis of modernity as an exhausted and dying epoch. In addition, he clearly shows how Nietzsche does not recoil from political life in late modernity, but articulates an ethical and political teaching that relocates his notorious "perfectionism" to the political sphere.
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  49.  21
    On Philolaus’ astronomy.Daniel W. Graham - 2015 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 69 (2):217-230.
    In Philolaus’ cosmology, the earth revolves around a central fire along with the other heavenly bodies, including a planet called the counter-earth which orbits below the earth. His theory can account for most astronomical phenomena. A common criticism of his theory since ancient times is that his counter-earth does no work in the system. Yet ancient sources say the planet was supposed to account for some lunar eclipses. A reconstruction of Philolaus’ cosmology shows how lunar eclipses occurring at certain times (...)
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  50.  35
    Freedom and purpose in biology.Daniel W. McShea - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 58:64–72.
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