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  1.  4
    Sufficient Reason: Volitional Pragmatism and the Meaning of Economic Institutions.Daniel W. Bromley - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    In the standard analysis of economic institutions--which include social conventions, the working rules of an economy, and entitlement regimes --economists invoke the same theories they use when analyzing individual behavior. In this profoundly innovative book, Daniel Bromley challenges these theories, arguing instead for "volitional pragmatism" as a plausible way of thinking about the evolution of economic institutions. Economies are always in the process of becoming. Here is a theory of how they become. Bromley argues that standard economic accounts see institutions (...)
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  2.  17
    Contestations Over Biodiversity Protection: Considering Peircean Semiosis.Juha Hiedanpaa & Daniel W. Bromley - 2012 - Environmental Values 21 (3):357-378.
    We develop the general outlines of an evolutionary biodiversity policy that is consistent with the pragmatism of Charles Sanders Peirce and the institutional economics of John R. Commons. Our model is applied to recent experiences with biodiversity policy in Finland, especially a local policy initiative: Natural Values Trading. The purpose of this experiment was to explore how a voluntary, fixed-term, payment- and incentive-based scheme for biodiversity protection might perform. As a result of the experiment, the principles of the scheme have (...)
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    Sufficient Reason: Volitional Pragmatism and the Meaning of Economic Institutions, by Daniel W. Bromley, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2006. [REVIEW]Daniel W. Bromley - 2009 - Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (1).
  4.  13
    The Stakeholder Game: Pleadings and Reasons in Environmental Policy.Juha Hiedanpää & Daniel W. Bromley - 2013 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (4):425-441.
    A commitment to receive input from stakeholders is often obligatory in the crafting of environmental policies. This requirement is presumed to satisfy certain conditions of democracy. The need for stakeholder input is quite intuitive; public decision makers want to know what their constituents—or at least a limited number of them—think about certain issues. At the same time, individuals, groups, communities, and various interest groups want to learn about the plans that authoritative agencies have concerning those things that affect their daily (...)
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  5. 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iii).John Valentine, Jon Fennell, Stephen Leach, Greg Moses, Juha Hiedanpää & Daniel W. Bromley - 2013 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (4).
     
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