7 found
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  1.  28
    The Positive Value of Moral Distress.Daniel W. Tigard - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (5):601-608.
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  2.  19
    Taking the Blame: Appropriate Responses to Medical Error.Daniel W. Tigard - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):101-105.
    Medical errors are all too common. Ever since a report issued by the Institute of Medicine raised awareness of this unfortunate reality, an emerging theme has gained prominence in the literature on medical error. Fears of blame and punishment, it is often claimed, allow errors to remain undisclosed. Accordingly, modern healthcare must shift away from blame towards a culture of safety in order to effectively reduce the occurrence of error. Against this shift, I argue that it would serve the medical (...)
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  3.  5
    Socially Responsive Technologies: Toward a Co-Developmental Path.Daniel W. Tigard, Niël H. Conradie & Saskia K. Nagel - forthcoming - AI and Society.
    Robotic and artificially intelligent systems are becoming prevalent in our day-to-day lives. As human interaction is increasingly replaced by human–computer and human–robot interaction, we occasionally speak and act as though we are blaming or praising various technological devices. While such responses may arise naturally, they are still unusual. Indeed, for some authors, it is the programmers or users—and not the system itself—that we properly hold responsible in these cases. Furthermore, some argue that since directing blame or praise at technology itself (...)
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  4.  20
    Rethinking Moral Distress: Conceptual Demands for a Troubling Phenomenon Affecting Health Care Professionals.Daniel W. Tigard - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (4):479-488.
    Recent medical and bioethics literature shows a growing concern for practitioners’ emotional experience and the ethical environment in the workplace. Moral distress, in particular, is often said to result from the difficult decisions made and the troubling situations regularly encountered in health care contexts. It has been identified as a leading cause of professional dissatisfaction and burnout, which, in turn, contribute to inadequate attention and increased pain for patients. Given the natural desire to avoid these negative effects, it seems to (...)
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  5.  11
    Automation and Utopia: Human Flourishing in a World Without Work John Danaher, 2019 Cambridge, MA and London, England Harvard University Press. 336pp, $39.95 • £31.95 • €36.00. [REVIEW]Daniel W. Tigard - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (4):684-687.
  6.  3
    There Is No Techno-Responsibility Gap.Daniel W. Tigard - forthcoming - Philosophy and Technology:1-19.
    In a landmark essay, Andreas Matthias claimed that current developments in autonomous, artificially intelligent systems are creating a so-called responsibility gap, which is allegedly ever-widening and stands to undermine both the moral and legal frameworks of our society. But how severe is the threat posed by emerging technologies? In fact, a great number of authors have indicated that the fear is thoroughly instilled. The most pessimistic are calling for a drastic scaling-back or complete moratorium on AI systems, while the optimists (...)
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  7.  3
    Taking One for the Team: A Reiteration on the Role of Self-Blame After Medical Error.Daniel W. Tigard - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (5):342-344.
    In a critique of my work on ‘taking the blame’ as a response to medical errors, my position on the potential goods of individual responsibility and blame is challenged. It is suggested that medicine is a ‘team sport’ and several rich examples are provided to support the possible harms of practitioner self-blame. Yet, it appears that my critics have misunderstood my demands and to whom they are directed. With this response, I offer several clarifications of my account, as well as (...)
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