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Daniela Cammack [5]Daniela Louise Cammack [1]
  1.  27
    Aristotle on the Virtue of the Multitude.Daniela Cammack - 2013 - Political Theory 41 (2):175-202.
    It is generally believed that one argument advanced by Aristotle in favor of the political authority of the multitude is that large groups can make better decisions by pooling their knowledge than individuals or small groups can make alone. This is supported by two analogies, one apparently involving a “potluck dinner” and the other aesthetic judgment. This article suggests that that interpretation of Aristotle’s argument is implausible given the historical context and several features of the text. It argues that Aristotle’s (...)
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  2.  6
    The Dēmos in Dēmokratia.Daniela Cammack - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):42-61.
    The meaning of dēmokratia is widely agreed: ‘rule by the people’, where dēmos, ‘people’, implies ‘entire citizen body’, synonymous with polis, ‘city-state’, or πάντες πολίται, ‘all citizens’. Dēmos, on this understanding, comprised rich and poor, leaders and followers, mass and elite alike. As such, dēmokratia is interpreted as constituting a sharp rupture from previous political regimes. Rule by one man or by a few had meant the domination of one part of the community over the rest, but dēmokratia, it is (...)
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  3.  17
    Aristotle, Athens and Beyond - Lintott Aristotle's Political Philosophy in its Historical Context. A New Translation and Commentary on Politics Books 5 and 6. Pp. X + 219. London and New York: Routledge, 2018. Cased, £115, Us$140. Isbn: 978-1-138-57071-9. [REVIEW]Daniela Cammack - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):63-65.
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  4.  10
    Aristotle's Denial of Deliberation About Ends.Daniela Cammack - 2013 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 30 (2):228-250.
    Although Aristotle stated that we do not deliberate about ends, it is widely agreed that he did not mean it. Eager to save him from implying that ends are irrational, scholars have argued that he did recognize deliberation about the specification of ends. This claim misunderstands Aristotle’s conceptions of both deliberation and ends. Deliberation is not the whole of reasoning: it is a subcategory concerning only practical matters within our power. Not deliberating about something thus does not preclude other forms (...)
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  5.  1
    Liberal Ends, Democratic Means? A Response to Josiah Ober’s Demopolis.Daniela Cammack - 2019 - Polis 36 (3):516-523.
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