Results for 'Dao'

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  1.  42
    John Dewey and the Virtue of Cook Ding's Dao.James Behuniak - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):161-174.
    Certain discussions aboutrelativismin the philosophy of Zhuangzi turn on the question of the morality of his dao . Some commentators, most notably Robert Eno, maintain (...)
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  2.  18
    What's in a Dao?: Ontology and Semiotics in Laozi and Zhuangzi.Daniel Fried - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (4):419-436.
    The present essay examines the conflicting ontological assumptions that one can find behind the word dao in the texts of the Laozi and Zhuangzi and argues that (...)
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  3. ChineseDaoand WesternTruth”: A Comparative and Dynamic Perspective.Keqian Xu - 2010 - Asian Social Science 6 (12):8.
    In the Pre-Qin time, pursuingDaowas the main task in the scholarship of most of the ancient Chinese philosophers, while the Ancient Greek philosophers considered (...)pursuingTruthas their ultimate goal. While theDaoin ancient Chinese texts and theTruthin ancient Greek philosophic literature do share or cross-cover certain connotations, there are subtle and important differences between the two comparable philosophic concepts. These differences have deep and profound impact on the later development of Chinese and Western philosophy and culture respectively. Interestingly, while the modern Chinese philosophy has gradually accepted and established the Western conception ofTruthon its way towards modernization, thepost-modernWestern philosophy is just undergoing a process of deconstructing its traditional concept ofTruth”, thus, in a certain sense, going closer to the traditional ChineseDao”. From a comparative, relative and dynamic perspective, there could possibly be a fusion of horizon between the ChineseDaoand the WesternTruth”. (shrink)
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  4. 論儒家哲學之的實踐屬性與歷史屬性On the Practice and History Attributes of theDaoin the Confucian Philosophy.Keqian Xu - 2006 - 學術論壇 Academic Forum, 2006 (11):32-34.
    The important feature of Dao as a philosophic category in early Confucian philosophy is its prominent practical and historical properties, which make it different from those western (...)
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  5.  20
    Aspects of Shen Dao's Political Philosophy.Eirik Lang Harris - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 32 (2):217-234.
    Even among those who work in the field of early Chinese philosophy,the name Shen Dao (慎到, ca. 360285 BCe) rarely calls to mind much of interest (...), and what it does call up are often simply depictions of him in several of the more famous texts of the time: in the Han Feizi as an advocate of positional power; in the Xunzi as being blinded by a focus on laws; or in the Zhuangzi as one who wished to discard knowledge. Few through the centuries have attempted to examine his philosophical thought in detail, in part because no complete edition of his work has existed since at least the tenth century. -/- Fragments of the work attributed to Shen Dao do, however, still exist, and by examining them we can begin to piece together an understanding of his political philosophy. In doing so, we come to the realization that Shen Dao's ideas are important not only historically but also merit attention from those engaged in constructive political philosophy. In his historical context, Shen Dao was one of the first political thinkers openly to question the tight connection between ethics and politics that was assumed by a range of thinkers in the Confucian and Mohist traditions. In particular, he provides a range of arguments against the state relying on the moral cultivation of even some of its members, focusing not on changing or developing the innate tendencies of human beings but rather on working with the natures humans initially have. (shrink)
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  6.  59
    Morality and Nature: The Essential Difference Between the Dao of Chinese Philosophy and Metaphysics in Western Philosophy[REVIEW]Weidong Yu & Jin Xu - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):360-369.
    Both thinkings on Dao in Chinese philosophy and metaphysics in Western philosophy investigate things on a spiritual level that transcends experience, but there are incommensurable differences between (...)
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  7.  25
    On Laozi's DaoAn Attempt to Make Philosophy Speak Chinese.Ruohui Li - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):1-19.
    How is the meaning of the Dao to be understood? To answer this question, we should not make indiscreet remarks outside of the framework of Laozis (...)thought; rather, we should enter the system, helping Laozi to establish a philosophical system on the Dao. Such an establishment is equivalent to that of a logical system of Laozis philosophy. We consider the presentation of Laozis thought as unverified propositions, and the purpose of this essay is to expound on these propositions and make them philosophy in a strict sense: The Dao that can be talked about is not Dao anymore, and while the Dao seems to have its name, it actually does not. Names are also particular things. The Dao is neither a name nor a thing; instead, the Dao implies nonexistence. Nonexistence means the possibility of the being of all things, and all these things are the manifestation of the Dao, thus nonexistence is also existence. Things are discriminated from the Dao, and because all these things are discriminated from each other, there is de (virtues). Where the discrimination is removed, there is the Dao, and adherence to the discrimination means deviation from the Dao. The diversity of things stirs up desires, and the control and utilization of things are a departure from the Dao. Only desires without self are compatible with nature. Desire discriminates with artificial measurements, and thus leads to knowledge. To acquire knowledge is to learn, and learning develops the capability to differentiate between the self and the other, so only a decline in learning can be conducive to human life. One can achieve something, transform external things and withstand nature only after he learns and acquires knowledge. On the other hand, wuwei 无为 (doing nothing) leads to wuwo 无我 (self-denial), avoiding the invention or differentiation of things. So, life is just the movement of the Dao, in which all things are allowed to take their own courses and nothing is left unaccomplished. (shrink)
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  8.  3
    Avīci Hell and Wújiān in the Cognitive Process: Observations on Some Technical Terms in the Jié Tuō Dào Lùn.Kyungrae Kim - 2016 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (5):939-956.
    The text Jié tuō dào lùn, or Chinese translation of *Vimuttimagga mentions the Avīci Hell all of a sudden in the section on the cognitive process. The (...)
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  9.  34
    Xunzi and the Prudence of Dao : Desire as the Motive to Become Good.Kurtis Hagen - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):53-70.
    Xunzi is often interpreted as offering a method for transforming our desires. This essay argues that, strictly speaking, he does not. Rather, Xunzi offers a method of (...)
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  10.  28
    Shen Dao's Own Voice in the Shenzi Fragments.Soon-Ja Yang - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):187-207.
    Feizi 韓非子 in terms of the concept of shi (circumstantial advantage, power, or authority). This argument is based on the A Critique of Circumstantial Advantage (Nanshi (...)
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  11.  16
    Xunzi as a Semantic Inferentialist: Zhengmin, Bian-Shuo and Dao-Li.Chung-I. Lin - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (3):311-340.
    This essay argues that the idea of name-rectification ( zheng ming 正名) in the Xunzi can be properly reconstructed as revealing a normative pragmatic semantic theme that (...)
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  12.  5
    Turns of the Dao.Robert Cummings Neville - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):499-510.
    Fifteen years after the publication of my assessment of comparative philosophy in the inaugural issue of Dao, this article comments on some of the major changes that (...)
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  13.  2
    The Triads of Expression and the Four Paradoxes of Sense: A Deleuzean Reading of the Two Opening Aphorisms of the Dao De Jing.Tatsiana Silantsyeva - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):355-377.
    Following Deleuzes analysis of expressivity, this article approaches the two opening aphorisms of the Dao De Jing 道德經 as two movements of a triadic differentiation of (...)expressive elements. These aphorisms are further presented within four Deleuzean paradoxes which necessarily accompany linguistic expression. Simultaneously, the opening lines are also analyzed as philosophical problems which constitute the core of the Daoist project itself within which the unthinkable or ineffable must be conceived of not as conditioned by privation or negation, but as being located within the movement of differentiation which is by nature positive and creative. As the paper shows, the linguistic involvement here is not one of discrimination but of a fundamentally dynamic immersion in problematic thought which underlies the mechanism of sense-making. This dynamism is presupposed by the disequilibrium between what expresses itself and its expressions, which is the birthplace of sense as the expressed. Our analysis of the latter is unfolded through an analogy drawn between Daoist and Spinozian expressionism supported by Deleuzes study on Spinoza. (shrink)
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  14. Dao De Jing: Making This Life Significant: A Philosophical Translation.Roger T. Ames & David L. Hall - 2003 - Ballantine Books.
    Composed more than 2,000 years ago during a turbulent period of Chinese history, the Dao de jing set forth an alternative vision of reality in a (...)world torn apart by violence and betrayal. Daoism, as this subtle but enduring philosophy came to be known, offers a comprehensive view of experience grounded in a full understanding of the wonders hidden in the ordinary. Now in this luminous new translation, based on the recently discovered ancient bamboo scrolls, China scholars Roger T. Ames and David L. Hall bring the timeless wisdom of the Dao de jing into our contemporary world. Though attributed to Laozi, “the Old Master,” the Dao de jing is, in fact, of unknown authorship and may well have originated in an oral tradition four hundred years before the time of Christ. Eschewing philosophical dogma, the Dao de jing set forth a series of maxims that outlined a new perspective on reality and invited readers to embark on a regimen of self-cultivation. In the Daoist world view, each particular element in our experience sends out an endless series of ripples throughout the cosmos. The unstated goal of the Dao de jing is self-transformationthe attainment of personal excellence that flows from the world and back into it. Responding to the teachings of Confucius, the Dao de jing revitalizes moral behavior by recommending a spontaneity made possible by the cultivatedhabitsof the individual. In this elegant volume, Ames and Hall feature the original Chinese texts of the Dao de jing and translate them into crisp, chiseled English that reads like poetry. Each of the eighty-one brief chapters is followed by clear, thought-provoking commentary exploring the layers of meaning in the text. The books extensive introduction is a model of accessible scholarship in which Ames and Hall consider the origin of the text, place the emergence of Daoist philosophy in its historical and political context, and outline its central tenets. The Dao de jing is a work of timeless wisdom and beauty, as vital today as it was in ancient China. This new version will stand as both a compelling introduction to the complexities of Daoist thought and as the classic modern English translation. (shrink)
     
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  15.  93
    A Dao of Technology?Barry Allen - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):151-160.
    Scholars have detected hostility to technology in Daoist thought. But is this a problem with any machine or only some applications of some machines by some people? (...)
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  16. Responding with Dao : Early Daoist Ethics and the Environment.Eric Sean Nelson - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (3):pp. 294-316.
    Early Daoism, as articulated in the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi, indirectly addresses environmental issues by intimating a non-reductive naturalistic ethics calling on humans to be open (...)and responsive to the specificities and interconnections of the world and environment to which they belong. "Dao" is not a substantial immanent or transcendent entity but the lived enactment of the intrinsic worth of the "myriad things" and the natural world occurring through how humans address and are addressed by them. Early Daoism potentially corrects both anthropocentrism and biocentrism in environmental ethics by disclosing the things themselves in the context of the selfcultivation of life. Given increasing environmental devastation and the dominance of views, practices, and institutions reducing nature to a background and/or raw material for human activity, this "ethics of encounter" discloses the life of things as inexhaustibly more than human projects and constructs, extending ethical recognition and responsibility beyond social relations and the social self. (shrink)
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  17. Emotion in Pre-Qin Ruist Moral Theory: An Explanation of "Dao Begins in Qing".Tang Yijie, Brian Bruya & Hai-ming Wen - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (2):271-281.
    There is a view that Ruists never put much emphasis on qing and even saw it in a negative light. This is perhaps a misunderstanding, especially in (...)
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  18. Zhuangzi's "Dao" as Background Noise.Frank W. Stevenson - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (2):301 - 331.
    This interpretation of Zhuangzi's Dao, particularly in the "Qi Wu Lun," as "background noise" begins from Zhuangzi's question as to whether any human statements-and human (...)
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  19.  78
    Review of Makeham, John, Ed., Dao Companion to Neo-Confucian Philosophy (Post Print Version). [REVIEW]Deborah A. Sommer - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):1-5.
    This volume includes nineteen articles by scholars from Asia, North America, and Europe on Chinese thinkers from the eleventh to the eighteenth centuries. Included here are intellectual (...)
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  20.  3
    Be-Ing and Non-Be-Ing in the Dao De Jing.Jing Liu - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (2):85-99.
    This essay questions the meaning of be-ing and non-be-ing in the DDJ with regard to the root-source meaning of dao. I first explore the (...)meaning of dao as the dark non-be-ing, revealing the connotations of the distinction between dao and things by comparison with some forms of Western metaphysics. The meaning of non-be-ing is elaborated in terms of the dynamic meanings of xu and chong ; The play between be-ing and non-be-ing is explored through the lens of yin and yang qi thinking. Qi thinking determines the mutually manifest and mutually interpretive characteristic of be-ing and non-be-ing. Be-ing and non-be-ing thus understood is an ever-flowing and mutually transforming process that penetrates the different levels of dao, things and humans. In the last part I investigate the meaning ofBe-ing comes from non-be-ing”. (shrink)
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  21.  40
    Governing Through the Dao: A Non-Anarchistic Interpretation of the Laozi[REVIEW]Alex Feldt - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):323-337.
    Within the literature, Daoist political philosophy has often been linked with anarchism. While some extended arguments have been offered in favor of this conclusion, I take this (...)
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  22.  17
    Relativity of the Human World and Dao in Lao-Zhuang - an Interpretation of Chapter 1 of the Zhuangzi and of the Laozi[REVIEW]Changchi Hao - 2005 - Asian Philosophy 15 (3):265 – 280.
    In this essay I offer an interpretative reading of the first chapter in the two canonical works, the Zhuang-zi and the Lao-zi, and argue that there (...) is an inner connection between the first chapters of the two books. My presupposition is that what Zhuang-zi has argued in "Xiao Yao You" is the theme of the relativity of the position of the human world, which is in accord with the mystery of Dao presented at the beginning of the Lao-zi. Therefore, there are two opposite directions running in the Daoist philosophy in Lao-zi and Zhuang-zi: the first one is from this world (worlds) to Dao; the second one is from Dao to the worlds. While the first emphasizes the relativity of the point of views of the worldly beings, the second shows the mystery of Dao. This can be seen as a hermeneutical circle. (shrink)
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  23.  55
    Revealing the Dao of Heaven Through the Dao of Humans: Sincerity in The Doctrine of the Mean.Yun Chen - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):537-551.
    In Zhongyong 中庸 (The Doctrine of the Mean), cheng (sincerity) is theDao of all Daos”, thevirtue of all virtues”, and thus connects the Dao (...)
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  24.  28
    Hearts in Agreement: Zhuangzi on Dao Adept Friendship.Donald N. Blakeley - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (3):pp. 318-336.
    This essay examines two stories in Zhuangzi chapter 6 that provide detailsabout the formal, substantive, and applied features of friendship between daoadepts. Using a template of seven (...)
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  25.  12
    Heng Dao and Appropriation of Nature - a Hermeneutical Interpretation of Laozi.Qingjie Wang - 2000 - Asian Philosophy 10 (2):149 – 163.
    This article has a hermeneutical interpretation of 'heng', one key word in the Laozi. The term 'heng' was not known until 1973 when the two silk manuscripts (...)
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  26. St. Thomas' Natural Law and Laozi's Heavenly Dao: A Comparison and Dialogue.Vincent Shen - 2011 - Philosophy and Culture 38 (4):85-105.
    This article aims to explore the concept of Heaven and St. Thomas Aquinas I "Summa Theologica" explained the basis of natural law and metaphysics. The philosophy, the (...)
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  27.  1
    Hutton, Eric L., Ed., Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Xunzi.Winnie Sung - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-5.
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  28.  28
    Heng and Temporality of Dao: Laozi and Heidegger[REVIEW]Qingjie Wang - 2001 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):55-71.
  29.  12
    Moral Values and the Daoist Sage in the Dao Dejing.Robert E. Allinson - 1996 - In Brian Carr (ed.), Morals and Society in Asian Philosophy. Curzon. pp. 1--156.
    The theme of this paper is that while there are four seemingly contradictory classes of statements in the Dao de Jing regarding moral values and the Daoist (...)
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  30.  1
    The Metaphysics and Unnamability of the Dao in the Daodejing and Wittgenstein.Leo K. C. Cheung - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):352-379.
    This essay is basically exegetical in nature, and its purpose is fourfold. First, I argue against the prevailing view that the dao of the Daodejing 道德經 (...)
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  31.  11
    Time, History, and Dao: Zhang Xuecheng, and Martin Heidegger.Edward Q. Wang - 2002 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):251-276.
  32.  54
    Wang, Xiaobo 王曉波, Dao and Fa: Explanation and Analysis of Legalist Thought and Huang-Lao Philosophy 道與法 : 法家思想和黃老哲學解析.Susan Blake - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):353-356.
  33.  2
    Dao Companion to Classical Confucian Philosophy Ed. by Vincent Shen.Ronnie Littlejohn - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):278-280.
    As is well known, the Dao Companions to Chinese Philosophy series is offered as a comprehensive and up-to-date introduction to various aspects of Chinese philosophy. The (...) series is quite expensive, but should belong at a minimum in all libraries where Chinese studies, Chinese philosophy, and Comparative Philosophy are in the schedule of course offerings. This volume, Dao Companion to Classical Confucian Philosophy, edited by the University of Torontos Vincent Shen is divided into two general sections: “Historical BackgroundandPhilosophical Issues.” The span of study isClassical Confucianism,” demarcated as the period from Confucius to Xunzi, and... (shrink)
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  34.  9
    Polemos and Dao: Conflict and Harmony in Heidegger and Zhuangzi.Steven Burik - unknown
    Using Heideggers reinterpretation of Heraclitus' polemos and Zhuangzi's ideas of dao, struggle and sorting of differences, I will argue for a reinterpretation of notions of conflict (...) and harmony in the two thinkers. Heidegger's Auseinandersetzung and Zhuangzi's famous 'sorting which evens things out', the seminal second chapter of the book Zhuangzi, suggest that harmony lies not in overcoming differences, but exactly in making difference and diversity central. I start with an exposition of how Heidegger understands logos and polemos in radically different ways from their 'normal' or 'traditional' meanings, and how he attaches great importance to both terms. I then proceed to analyse Zhuangzis understanding of the world in terms of the yin-yang dichotomous forces, and argue how a comparison of both thinkers can show us a new understanding of ideas of difference, conflict and harmony. It will be shown how harmony in Daoism is not to be understood as a dialectical resolution to conflict, but more as a situating within the different forces, and a certain form of responding to conflict and diversity. Heideggers differential thought will be employed to show a similar approach to difference, where in contradistinction to a Hegelian resolution or sublimation of the difference, Heidegger shows how difference is not to be overcome, but to be acknowledged as fundamental to being. Such responses carry a form of great responsibility, since they might be perceived as random and spontaneous. Yet I will argue that they are anything but random, and that both Heidegger and Zhuangzi seek to engage diversity, struggle and conflict in a most objective and disinterested manner. Such an engagement will then be shown to have ethical implications beyond the philosophical worlds of Heidegger and Zhuangzi. (shrink)
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  35.  1
    The Dao That Cannot Be Named.Richard McDonough - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):738-762.
    To produce a history entirely from speculations alone seems no better than to sketch a romance.... Yet, what may not be [known about actual history], can, nonetheless, (...)
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  36.  26
    On the Dao in the Commentary of the Book of Change.Yang Qingzhong - 2006 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (4):572-593.
    The existence of the Dao (the Way), according to the Yizhuan 易传 (the Commentary), is something intangible. The connotation of the Dao is the law of (...)change caused by the interaction between yin and yang. The main functions of the Dao are "to change" and "to generate". The intangible refers to the law of change caused by the interaction between yin and yang, and the law is expressed by the divinatory symbolic system (卦爻符号, the trigrams or hexagrams). It is through the unique permutation of yin and yang lines of a trigram or hexagram that the law of change is explained as a universal model uniting celestial, terrestrial and human laws. The symbolic system is used to express the universal nature of continual generation of life. (shrink)
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  37.  36
    Dao and Process.Frank J. Hoffman - 2002 - Asian Philosophy 12 (3):197 – 212.
    This paper is about different types of silence, and about differing processes of philosophical investigation and sagely illumination. It is argued that the sagely Dao of wu (...)
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  38.  10
    Liu, Xiaogan, Ed., Dao Companion to Daoist Philosophy[REVIEW]David Chai - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (2):303-306.
  39.  34
    Dao and Skepticism.Paul Kjellberg - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (3):281-299.
    The Zhuangzi raises skeptical problems it does not solve. At best, it asserts that solutions are unnecessary but does not prove it. This is not a fault (...)
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  40.  7
    Peterman, James F., Whose Tradition? Which Dao?—Confucius and Wittgenstein on Moral Learning and Reflection.Puqun Li - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (3):467-471.
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  41.  8
    Goldin, Paul, Ed., Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei[REVIEW]Henrique Schneider - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):425-429.
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  42.  19
    Emotion in Pre-Qin Ruist Moral Theory: An Explanation of "Dao Begins in Qing".Yijie Tang, Brian Bruya & Haiming Wen - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (2):271-281.
    : There is a view that Ruists never put much emphasis on qing and even saw it in a negative light. This is perhaps a misunderstanding, especially in (...) regard to pre-Qin Ruism. In the Guodian Xing zi ming chu, the passage "dao begins in qing" plays an important role in our understanding of the pre-Qin notion of qing. This article concentrates on the "theory of qing" in both pre-Qin Ruism and Daoism and attempts a philosophical interpretation of "dao begins in qing," and in the process offers philosophical interpretations of a number of important notions. (shrink)
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  43.  5
    Li, Yancang 李延倉, The Deconstruction and Reconstruction of the Dao: From the Zhuangzi to G Uo Xiangs Commentary to C Heng Xuanyings Sub-Commentary 道體的失落與重建: 莊子》、到成》.Joanna Guzowska - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (2):299-302.
  44.  7
    Shen, Vincent, Ed., Dao Companion to Classical Confucian Philosophy.Robert Cummings Neville - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):445-449.
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  45.  14
    Way as Dao; Way as Halakha: Confucianism, Judaism, and Way Metaphors.Galia Patt-Shamir - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):137-158.
  46.  14
    Embracing Differences and Many: The Signification of One in Zhuangzi's Utterance of Dao.Geling Shang - 2002 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):229-250.
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  47.  6
    Shen Dao's Theory of Fa and His Influence on Han Fei.Soon-ja Yang - 2013 - In Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer. pp. 47--63.
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  48.  5
    Olberding, Amy, Ed., Dao Companion to the Analects[REVIEW]Bryan Van Norden - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):605-608.
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  49.  13
    Lin, Anwu 林安梧, Misplaced Dao: The Essential Problem of Chinese Political Thought 道的錯置中國政治思想的根本困結.Yenyi 李彥儀 Lee - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):423-427.
  50.  5
    A Critical Review of Hu Jun, Dao and Truth: A Study of Jin Yuelin's Philosophy.Lin Ma - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):177-180.
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