Results for 'Darren O. Sumner'

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  1.  22
    Common Actualization: Karl Barth's Recovery and Reappropriation of the Communication of Natures.Darren O. Sumner - 2011 - Neue Zeitschrift für Systematicsche Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 53 (4):465-479.
    The doctrine of the communication of natures has played a primarily descriptive role in the history of Christology, and so it is perhaps unsurprising that it has largely gone missing from contemporary theology. This is a serious oversight. But Karl Barth is a noteworthy exception to the reductionist trend, and he provides the Reformed tradition's most complete and substantive engagement with the communication of natures and its implications for dogmatic theology. Through a close reading of volume IV/2 of the Church (...)
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  2.  25
    An Electrophysiological Signal That Precisely Tracks the Emergence of Error Awareness.Peter R. Murphy, Ian H. Robertson, Darren Allen, Robert Hester & Redmond G. O'Connell - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  3.  4
    Hick, Darren Hudson. Artistic License: The Philosophical Problems of Copyright and Appropriation. The University of Chicago Press, 2017, VIII + 231 Pp., $30.00 Paper. [REVIEW]James O. Young - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (3):362-365.
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  4.  11
    'Why Won't You Just Tell Us the Answer?' [Book Review].Darren O'Connell - 2013 - Agora (History Teachers' Association of Victoria) 48 (2):77.
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  5.  7
    Young, James O., Radically Rethinking Copyright in the Arts: A Philosophical Approach.Darren Hudson Hick - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
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  6.  3
    Young, James O., Radically Rethinking Copyright in the Arts: A Philosophical Approach (Routledge, 2021), 184 Pp., $155.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]Darren Hudson Hick - 2021 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 79 (1):124-127.
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  7.  17
    Reporting Pauses in Dramatic Dialogue.Julia C. Gardner, Heidi S. McMillan, Darren Townsend-Handscomb, Richard Barrett-Bates & Daniel C. O’Connell - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (2):167-170.
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  8. Public Control of Labor Relations.D. O. Bowman, Sumner H. Slichter, Jerome L. Toner, James Myers & Byron R. Abernethy - 1943 - Science and Society 7 (4):361-367.
     
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  9.  4
    How to Disagree: Negotiate Difference in a Divided World, by Adam Ferner and Darren Chetty.Elizabeth O'Brien - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 7 (2).
    In writing 'How to Disagree', Ferner and Chetty aim to bring to light those assumptions we make about the world, its structure and the lived reality of what we assume to be real, in order to see how these assumptions affect the ways we engage with each other. It is a fascinating endeavour and very well done through this thoughtful text. 'How to Disagree' is part of the 'Build and Become' series, a community of texts adopting a particular shared approach (...)
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  10.  12
    Awakening to the Secret Code of Your Mind: Your Mind's Journey to Inner Peace.Darren R. Weissman - 2010 - Hay House.
    What if you could, like a diamond forged through heat and pressure, transform every painful, scary, and stressful experience in your life into one that is meaningful, courageous, and inspiring? What if you were provided with the tools that allow you to tap and manifest the true power that exists within you--the power to shine? Are you ready to discover your path to peace? In this fascinating book, Dr. Darren Weissman shares ancient spiritual wisdom fused with a modern-day understanding (...)
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  11.  1
    Recentering Christian Ethics as Comparative Religious Ethics.Simeon O. Ilesanmi - 2019 - Journal of Religious Ethics 47 (4):773-777.
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  12. Trust, Distrust, and Mistrust in Multinational Democracies: Comparative Perspectives.Dimitrios Karmis & François Rocher (eds.) - 2018 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    The importance of research on the notion of trust has grown considerably in the social sciences over the last three decades. Much has been said about the decline of political trust in democracies and intense debates have occurred about the nature and complexity of the relationship between trust and democracy. Political trust is usually understood as trust in political institutions, trust between citizens, and to a lesser extent, trust between groups. However, the literature on trust has given no special attention (...)
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  13.  6
    New Light on Personal Well–Being.John White - 2002 - Philosophy of Education 36 (4):661-669.
    Books reviewed in this article: Roger Crisp and Brad Hooker (eds), Well–being and Morality: essays in honour of James Griffin James Griffin, Value Judgement John O’Neill, The Market: ethics, knowledge and politics E. F. Paul, F. D. Miller and J. Paul (eds), Human Flourishing Joseph Raz, Engaging Reason L. W. Sumner, Welfare, Happiness and Ethics.
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  14. Welfare, Happiness, and Ethics.L. W. Sumner - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    Moral philosophers agree that welfare matters. But they disagree about what it is, or how much it matters. In this vital new work, Wayne Sumner presents an original theory of welfare, investigating its nature and discussing its importance. He considers and rejects all notable theories of welfare, both objective and subjective, including hedonism and theories founded on desire or preference. His own theory connects welfare closely with happiness or life satisfaction. Reacting against the value pluralism that currently dominates moral (...)
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  15.  84
    Two Theories of the Good: L. W. SUMNER.L. W. Sumner - 1992 - Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (2):1-14.
    Suppose that the ultimate point of ethics is to make the world a better place. If it is, we must face the question: better in what respect? If the good is prior to the right — that is, if the rationale for all requirements of the right is that they serve to further the good in one way or another — then what is this good? Is there a single fundamental value capable of underlying and unifying all of our moral (...)
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  16.  77
    Is Virtue Its Own Reward?: L. W. SUMNER.L. W. Sumner - 1998 - Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (1):18-36.
    If I lead a life of virtue, that may well be good for you. But will it also be good for me? The idea that it will—or even must—is an ancient one, and its appeal runs deep. For if this idea is correct then we can provide everyone with a good reason—arguably the best reason—for being virtuous. However, for all the effort which has been invested in defending the idea, by some of the best minds in the history of philosophy, (...)
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  17. The Moral Foundation of Rights.L. W. Sumner - 1987 - Oxford University Press.
    What does it mean for someone to have a moral right to something? What kinds of creatures can have rights, and which rights can they have? While rights are indispensable to our moral and political thinking, they are also mysterious and controversial; as long as these controversies remain unsolved, rights will remain vulnerable to skepticism. Here, Sumner constructs both a coherent concept of a moral right and a workable substantive theory of rights to provide the moral foundation necessary to (...)
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  18. Are There Indefeasible Epistemic Rules?Darren Bradley - 2019 - Philosophers' Imprint 19.
    What if your peers tell you that you should disregard your perceptions? Worse, what if your peers tell you to disregard the testimony of your peers? How should we respond if we get evidence that seems to undermine our epistemic rules? Several philosophers have argued that some epistemic rules are indefeasible. I will argue that all epistemic rules are defeasible. The result is a kind of epistemic particularism, according to which there are no simple rules connecting descriptive and normative facts. (...)
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  19.  46
    The Case for Animal Rights.L. W. Sumner - 1986 - Noûs 20 (3):425-434.
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  20. Chapter Twelve Growing Minds, Computability, and the Potentially Infinite Darren Abramson.Darren Abramson - 2007 - In Soraj Hongladarom (ed.), Computing and Philosophy in Asia. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 179.
     
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  21.  68
    Review of Sumner, *Welfare, Happiness, and Ethics*. [REVIEW]Bruce Brower - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (2):309.
    Despite being co-opted by economists and politicians for their own purposes, ‘welfare’ traditionally refers to well-being, and it is in this sense that L. W. Sumner understands the term. His book is a clear, careful, and well-crafted investigation into major theories of welfare, accompanied by a one-chapter defense of “welfarism,” the view that welfare is the only foundational value necessary for ethics. Sumner himself is attracted to utilitarianism, but he makes no commitment to it in this work, which (...)
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  22. The Protein Ontology: A Structured Representation of Protein Forms and Complexes.Darren Natale, Cecilia N. Arighi, Winona C. Barker, Judith A. Blake, Carol J. Bult, Michael Caudy, Harold J. Drabkin, Peter D’Eustachio, Alexei V. Evsikov, Hongzhan Huang, Jules Nchoutmboube, Natalia V. Roberts, Barry Smith, Jian Zhang & Cathy H. Wu - 2011 - Nucleic Acids Research 39 (1):D539-D545.
    The Protein Ontology (PRO) provides a formal, logically-based classification of specific protein classes including structured representations of protein isoforms, variants and modified forms. Initially focused on proteins found in human, mouse and Escherichia coli, PRO now includes representations of protein complexes. The PRO Consortium works in concert with the developers of other biomedical ontologies and protein knowledge bases to provide the ability to formally organize and integrate representations of precise protein forms so as to enhance accessibility to results of protein (...)
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  23. Confirmation in a Branching World: The Everett Interpretation and Sleeping Beauty.Darren Bradley - 2011 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (2):323-342.
    Sometimes we learn what the world is like, and sometimes we learn where in the world we are. Are there any interesting differences between the two kinds of cases? The main aim of this article is to argue that learning where we are in the world brings into view the same kind of observation selection effects that operate when sampling from a population. I will first explain what observation selection effects are ( Section 1 ) and how they are relevant (...)
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  24.  62
    Sumner on Abortion: Moral Theory and Moral Standing: A Reply to Woods and Soles.L. W. Sumner - 1985 - Dialogue 24 (4):691-.
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  25. Naturalness as a Constraint on Priors.Darren Bradley - 2020 - Mind 129 (513):179-203.
    Many epistemological problems can be solved by the objective Bayesian view that there are rationality constraints on priors, that is, inductive probabilities. But attempts to work out these constraints have run into such serious problems that many have rejected objective Bayesianism altogether. I argue that the epistemologist should borrow the metaphysician’s concept of naturalness and assign higher priors to more natural hypotheses.
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  26. Multiple Universes and Observation Selection Effects.Darren Bradley - 2009 - American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (1):72.
    The fine-tuning argument can be used to support the Many Universe hypothesis. The Inverse Gambler’s Fallacy objection seeks to undercut the support for the Many Universe hypothesis. The objection is that although the evidence that there is life somewhere confirms Many Universes, the specific evidence that there is life in this universe does not. I will argue that the Inverse Gambler’s Fallacy is not committed by the fine-tuning argument. The key issue is the procedure by which the universe with life (...)
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  27.  66
    Sumner On Desires and Well-Being.Krister Bykvist - 2002 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (4):475-490.
    In a recent book, Wayne Sumner gives a lucid and very thorough treatment of the standard accounts of well-being. While his criticisms of hedonism and objectivism are convincing, his objections to preferentialism are less so. He argues that preferentialism is seriously mistaken, for preference satisfaction is neither sufficient nor necessary for well-being. In this paper, I show that Sumner’s arguments do not support this conclusion. In particular, I show that some of his main criticisms are based on a (...)
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  28. There Is No Door.Darren Domsky - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy 101 (9):445 - 464.
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  29.  5
    Age, Pain Intensity, Values-Discrepancy, and Mindfulness as Predictors for Mental Health and Cognitive Fusion: Hierarchical Regressions With Mediation Analysis.Darren J. Edwards - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  30.  50
    Racism as ‘Reasonableness’: Philosophy for Children and the Gated Community of Inquiry.Darren Chetty - 2018 - Ethics and Education 13 (1):39-54.
    In this paper, I argue that the notion of ‘reasonableness’ that is, for many, at the heart of the Philosophy for Children approach particularly and education for democratic citizenship more broadly, is constituted within the epistemology of ‘white ignorance’ and operates in such a way that it is unlikely to transgress the boundaries of white ignorance so as to view it from without. Drawing on scholarship in critical legal studies and social epistemology, I highlight how notions of reasonableness often include (...)
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  31. Phenomenological Psychology: Theory, Research and Method.Darren Langdridge - 2007 - Pearson Education.
    The book moves from descriptive through to more interpretative phenomenological methods to enable the reader to learn to use the main approaches to ...
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  32. Self-Location is No Problem for Conditionalization.Darren Bradley - 2011 - Synthese 182 (3):393-411.
    How do temporal and eternal beliefs interact? I argue that acquiring a temporal belief should have no effect on eternal beliefs for an important range of cases. Thus, I oppose the popular view that new norms of belief change must be introduced for cases where the only change is the passing of time. I defend this position from the purported counter-examples of the Prisoner and Sleeping Beauty. I distinguish two importantly different ways in which temporal beliefs can be acquired and (...)
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  33.  82
    Pedagogies of Hope.Darren Webb - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4):397-414.
    Hoping is an integral part of what it is to be human, and its significance for education has been widely noted. Hope is, however, a contested category of human experience and getting to grips with its characteristics and dynamics is a difficult task. The paper argues that hope is not a singular undifferentiated experience and is best understood as a socially mediated human capacity with varying affective, cognitive and behavioural dimensions. Drawing on the philosophy, theology and psychology of hope, five (...)
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  34. When Betting Odds and Credences Come Apart: More Worries for Dutch Book Arguments.Darren Bradley & Hannes Leitgeb - 2006 - Analysis 66 (2):119-127.
    If an agent believes that the probability of E being true is 1/2, should she accept a bet on E at even odds or better? Yes, but only given certain conditions. This paper is about what those conditions are. In particular, we think that there is a condition that has been overlooked so far in the literature. We discovered it in response to a paper by Hitchcock (2004) in which he argues for the 1/3 answer to the Sleeping Beauty problem. (...)
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  35. Functionalism and The Independence Problems.Darren Bradley - 2013 - Noûs 47 (1):545-557.
    The independence problems for functionalism stem from the worry that if functional properties are defined in terms of their causes and effects then such functional properties seem to be too intimately connected to these purported causes and effects. I distinguish three different ways the independence problems can be filled out – in terms of necessary connections, analytic connections and vacuous explanations. I argue that none of these present serious problems. Instead, they bring out some important and over-looked features of functionalism.
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  36. The Elephant in the Room: Picturebooks, Philosophy for Children and Racism.Darren Chetty - 2014 - Childhood and Philosophy 10 (19):11-31.
    Whilst continuing racism is often invoked as evidence of the urgent need for Philosophy for Children, there is little in the current literature that addresses the topic. Drawing on Critical Race Theory and the related field of Critical Whiteness Studies , I argue that racism is deeply ingrained culturally in society, and best understood in the context of ‘Whiteness’. Following a CRT-informed analysis of two picturebooks that have been recommended as starting points for philosophical enquiry into multiculturalism, racism and diversity (...)
     
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  37. Framework for a Protein Ontology.Darren A. Natale, Cecilia N. Arighi, Winona Barker, Judith Blake, Ti-Cheng Chang, Zhangzhi Hu, Hongfang Liu, Barry Smith & Cathy H. Wu - 2007 - BMC Bioinformatics 8 (Suppl 9):S1.
    Biomedical ontologies are emerging as critical tools in genomic and proteomic research where complex data in disparate resources need to be integrated. A number of ontologies exist that describe the properties that can be attributed to proteins; for example, protein functions are described by Gene Ontology, while human diseases are described by Disease Ontology. There is, however, a gap in the current set of ontologies—one that describes the protein entities themselves and their relationships. We have designed a PRotein Ontology (PRO) (...)
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  38.  30
    The History and Theory of Vitalism.Francis B. Sumner - 1916 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 13 (4):103-109.
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  39. Philosophers Should Prefer Simpler Theories.Darren Bradley - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (12):3049-3067.
    Should philosophers prefer simpler theories? Huemer (Philos Q 59:216–236, 2009) argues that the reasons to prefer simpler theories in science do not apply in philosophy. I will argue that Huemer is mistaken—the arguments he marshals for preferring simpler theories in science can also be applied in philosophy. Like Huemer, I will focus on the philosophy of mind and the nominalism/Platonism debate. But I want to engage with the broader issue of whether simplicity is relevant to philosophy.
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  40.  40
    Précis of O'Keefe & Nadel's The Hippocampus as a Cognitive Map.John O'Keefe & Lynn Nadel - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):487-494.
    Theories of spatial cognition are derived from many sources. Psychologists are concerned with determining the features of the mind which, in combination with external inputs, produce our spatialized experience. A review of philosophical and other approaches has convinced us that the brain must come equipped to impose a three-dimensional Euclidean framework on experience – our analysis suggests that object re-identification may require such a framework. We identify this absolute, nonegocentric, spatial framework with a specific neural system centered in the hippocampus.A (...)
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  41.  26
    There Is No Door: Finally Solving the Problem of Moral Luck.Darren Domsky - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy 101 (9):445-464.
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  42.  6
    Artistic License: The Philosophical Problems of Copyright and Appropriation.Darren Hudson Hick - 2019 - University of Chicago Press.
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  43.  28
    Process, Orientation, and System: The Pedagogical Operation of Utopia in the Work of Paulo Freire.Darren Webb - 2012 - Educational Theory 62 (5):593-608.
    Recent years have witnessed a renewed interest in utopianism within educational theory. In this essay, Darren Webb explores the utopian pedagogy of Paulo Freire in the context of what one commentator has dubbed “the educational comeback of utopia.” Webb argues that Freire's significance lies in the way he embraced both “utopia as process” and “utopia as system.” This is significant because the contemporary rejuvenation of utopianism has extended only so far, embracing utopia conceived as an open‐ended process of becoming (...)
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  44.  67
    Ought-contextualism and Reasoning.Darren Bradley - forthcoming - Synthese:1-23.
    What does logic tells us how about we ought to reason? If P entails Q, and you believe P, should you believe Q? There seem to be cases where you should not, for example, if you have evidence against Q, or the inference is not worth making. So we need a theory telling us when an inference ought to be made, and when not. I will argue that we should embed the issue in an independently motivated contextualist semantics for ‘ought’. (...)
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  45. Should Explanations Omit the Details?Darren Bradley - 2020 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 71 (3):827-853.
    There is a widely shared belief that the higher-level sciences can provide better explanations than lower-level sciences. But there is little agreement about exactly why this is so. It is often suggested that higher-level explanations are better because they omit details. I will argue instead that the preference for higher-level explanations is just a special case of our general preference for informative, logically strong, beliefs. I argue that our preference for informative beliefs entirely accounts for why higher-level explanations are sometimes (...)
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  46.  32
    The Consent Problem Within DNA Biobanks.Darren Shickle - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (3):503-519.
    Large prospective biobanks are being established containing DNA, lifestyle and health information in order to study the relationship between diseases, genes and environment. Informed consent is a central component of research ethics protection. Disclosure of information about the research is an essential element of seeking informed consent. Within biobanks, it is not possible at recruitment to describe in detail the information that will subsequently be collected because people will not know which disease they will develop. It will also be difficult (...)
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  47. Philosophy of Mind Is (in Part) Philosophy of Computer Science.Darren Abramson - 2011 - Minds and Machines 21 (2):203-219.
    In this paper I argue that whether or not a computer can be built that passes the Turing test is a central question in the philosophy of mind. Then I show that the possibility of building such a computer depends on open questions in the philosophy of computer science: the physical Church-Turing thesis and the extended Church-Turing thesis. I use the link between the issues identified in philosophy of mind and philosophy of computer science to respond to a prominent argument (...)
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  48. Carnap’s Epistemological Critique of Metaphysics.Darren Bradley - 2018 - Synthese 195 (5):2247-2265.
    Many who take a dismissive attitude towards metaphysics trace their view back to Carnap’s ‘Empiricism, Semantics and Ontology’. But the reason Carnap takes a dismissive attitude to metaphysics is a matter of controversy. I will argue that no reason is given in ‘Empiricism, Semantics and Ontology’, and this is because his reason for rejecting metaphysical debates was given in ‘Pseudo-Problems in Philosophy’. The argument there assumes verificationism, but I will argue that his argument survives the rejection of verificationism. The root (...)
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  49. Pragmatism and Purpose Essays Presented to Thomas A. Goudge /Edited by L.W. Sumner, John G. Slater, Fred Wilson. --. --.Thomas A. Goudge, John G. Slater, Fred Wilson & L. W. Sumner - 1981
     
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  50.  58
    A Critical Introduction to Formal Epistemology.Darren Bradley - 2015 - London: Bloomsbury.
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