Results for 'Darwin Muir'

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  1.  9
    Tilt Aftereffects in Central and Peripheral Vision.Darwin Muir & Ray Over - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (2):165.
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  2. Emotional Development: Recent Research Advances.Jacqueline Nadel & Darwin Muir (eds.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In this volume an outstanding group of scientists consider emotional development from fetal life onwards. The book includes views from neuroscience, primatology, robotics, psychopathology, and prenatal development. The first book of its kind, this book will be of major interest to all those interested in emotion, from the fields of social, developmental, and clinical psychology, to psychiatry, and neuroscience.
     
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  3.  44
    Charles Darwin's Natural Selection: Being the Second Part of His Big Species Book Written From 1856 to 1858.Charles Darwin - 1975 - Cambridge University Press.
    Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species is unquestionably one of the chief landmarks in biology. The Origin (as it is widely known) was literally only an abstract of the manuscript Darwin had originally intended to complete and publish as the formal presentation of his views on evolution. Compared with the Origin, his original long manuscript work on Natural Selection, which is presented here and made available for the first time in printed form, has more abundant examples and (...)
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  4. Charles Darwin's Zoology Notes & Specimen Lists From H.M.S. Beagle.Charles Darwin - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This transcription of notes made by Charles Darwin during the voyage of H. M. S. Beagle records his observations of the animals and plants that he encountered, and provides a valuable insight into the intellectual development of one of our most influential scientists. Darwin drew on many of these notes for his well known Journal of Researches (1839), but the majority of them have remained unpublished. This volume provides numerous examples of his unimpeachable accuracy in describing the wide (...)
     
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  5. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary.Charles Darwin - 1933 - Cambridge University Press.
    On 27th December 1831, HMS Beagle set out from Plymouth under the command of Captain Robert Fitzroy on a voyage that lasted nearly 5 years. The purpose of the trip was to complete a survey of the southern coasts of South America, and afterwards to circumnavigate the globe. The ship's geologist and naturalist was Charles Darwin. Darwin kept a diary throughout the voyage in which he recorded his daily activities, not only on board the ship but also during (...)
     
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  6. The Correspondence of Charles Darwin.Charles Darwin, Frederick Burkhardt & Sydney Smith - 1988 - Journal of the History of Biology 21 (2):343-349.
     
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  7. Charles Darwin's Notebooks, 1836-1844: Geology, Transmutation of Species, Metaphysical Enquiries.Charles Darwin - 1987 - Cornell University Press.
  8. The Autobiography of Charles Darwin and selected letters.Francis Darwin - 1960 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 15 (1):96-97.
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  9. The Correspondence of Charles Darwin.Charles Darwin - 1988 - Journal of the History of Biology 21 (3):501-519.
     
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  10. Charles Darwin's Marginalia.Charles Darwin - 1990 - Garland.
  11.  16
    The Red Notebook of Charles Darwin.Sandra Herbert, Charles Darwin, P. Thomas Carroll, Paul H. Barrett & Ralph Colp - 1982 - Journal of the History of Biology 15 (3):467-471.
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  12. Darwin's Century.Loren Eiseley, F. Darwin & Charles Darwin - 1960 - Science and Society 24 (3):278-280.
     
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  13. The Works of Charles Darwin.Charles Darwin - 1987 - New York University Press.
  14.  17
    The Collected Papers of Charles Darwin.Charles Darwin - 1977 - University of Chicago Press.
  15.  15
    An Early Darwin Manuscript: The "Outline and Draft of 1839".Peter J. Vorzimmer & Charles Darwin - 1975 - Journal of the History of Biology 8 (2):191 - 217.
  16. The Collected Papers of Charles Darwin.Charles Darwin & Paul H. Barrett - 1979 - Journal of the History of Biology 12 (1):209-209.
     
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  17. The Darwin Reader.Charles Darwin - 1996 - Norton.
  18.  17
    Darwin's "Questions About the Breeding of Animals" (1839).Peter J. Vorzimmer & C. Darwin - 1969 - Journal of the History of Biology 2 (1):269 - 281.
  19.  19
    Charles Darwin: An Appreciation.“Questions of the Day and of the Fray,” No. XII.Leonard Darwin - 1923 - The Eugenics Review 15 (3):512.
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  20. Charles Darwin's Autobiography.Francis Darwin - 1954 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (19):271-271.
  21. Erasmus Darwin.Ernst Krause, W. S. Dallas & Charles Darwin - 1881 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 11:200-207.
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  22. Charles Darwin, 1809-1882, Anton Dohrn, 1840-1909: Correspondence.Charles Darwin, Anton Dohrn & Christiane Groeben - 1983 - Journal of the History of Biology 16 (3):446-446.
     
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  23. Darwin: The Indelible Stamp: The Evolution of an Idea.Charles Darwin - 2005 - Running Press.
    The voyage of the Beagle -- On the origin of species by means of natural selection -- The descent of man, and selection in relation to sex -- The expression of the emotions in man and animals.
     
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  24. La vie et la correspondance de Charles Darwin. Tome Ier.Francis Darwin & Henry C. de Varigny - 1888 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 26:191-199.
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  25. La Vie et la Correspondance de Charles Darwin, avec un chapitre autobiographique, Tome second.Francis Darwin & Henry C. de Varigny - 1889 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 27:190-191.
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  26. Philosophers' Ideas That Changed the World. Christ, Darwin, Marx, Freud.Charles Darwin, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jesus Christ & Center for Humanities - 1990 - Center for Humanities.
     
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  27.  4
    The Essential Darwin.Charles Darwin - 1939 - Dover Publications.
  28. The Living Thoughts of Darwin.Charles Darwin - 1958 - London: Cassell.
  29. What Darwin Really Said.Charles Darwin - 1929 - London: G. Routledge & Sons.
  30. Charles Darwin's Zoology Notes & Specimen Lists From H.M.S. Beagle.Richard Keynes & Charles Darwin - 2001 - Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):603-604.
     
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  31. Charles Darwin's "The Life of Erasmus Darwin".Desmond King-Hele, Charles Darwin & Richard Darwin Keynes - 2003 - Journal of the History of Biology 36 (2):428-430.
     
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  32. Charles Darwin: Interviews and Recollections.Harold Orel & Charles Darwin - 2001 - Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):605-606.
     
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  33. Mental Evolution in Animals. With a Posthumous Essay on Instinct, by C. Darwin.George John Romanes & Charles Robert Darwin - 1883
     
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  34. A Concordance to Charles Darwin's Notebooks, 1836-1844.Donald J. Weinshank & Charles Darwin (eds.) - 1990 - Cornell University Press.
  35. Darwin's Metaphysics of Mind.Robert J. Richards - 2005 - In V. Hoesle & C. Illies (eds.), Darwin and Philosophy. Notre Dame University Press. pp. 166-80.
    Our image of Darwin is hardly that of a German metaphysician. By reason of his intellectual tradition—that of British empiricism—and psychological disposition, he was a man of apparently more stolid character, one who could be excited by beetles and earthworms but not, we assume, by abstruse philosophy. Yet Darwin constructed a theory of evolution whose conceptual grammar expresses and depends on a certain kind of metaphysics. During his youthful period as a romantic adventurer, he sailed to exotic lands (...)
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  36. Darwin on Variation and Heredity.Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther - 2000 - Journal of the History of Biology 33 (3):425-455.
    Darwin's ideas on variation, heredity, and development differ significantly from twentieth-century views. First, Darwin held that environmental changes, acting either on the reproductive organs or the body, were necessary to generate variation. Second, heredity was a developmental, not a transmissional, process; variation was a change in the developmental process of change. An analysis of Darwin's elaboration and modification of these two positions from his early notebooks (1836-1844) to the last edition of the /Variation of Animals and Plants (...)
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  37. Darwin Was a Teleologist.James G. Lennox - 1993 - Biology and Philosophy 8 (4):409-421.
    It is often claimed that one of Darwin''s chief accomplishments was to provide biology with a non-teleological explanation of adaptation. A number of Darwin''s closest associates, however, and Darwin himself, did not see it that way. In order to assess whether Darwin''s version of evolutionary theory does or does not employ teleological explanation, two of his botanical studies are examined. The result of this examination is that Darwin sees selection explanations of adaptations as teleological explanations. (...)
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  38. Pattern as Observation: Darwin’s ‘Great Facts’ of Geographical Distribution.Casey Helgeson - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 7 (2):337-351.
    Among philosophical analyses of Darwin’s Origin, a standard view says the theory presented there had no concrete observational consequences against which it might be checked. I challenge this idea with a new analysis of Darwin’s principal geographical distribution observations and how they connect to his common ancestry hypothesis.
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  39. Darwin’s Solution to the Species Problem.Marc Ereshefsky - 2010 - Synthese 175 (3):405 - 425.
    Biologists and philosophers that debate the existence of the species category fall into two camps. Some believe that the species category does not exist and the term 'species' should be eliminated from biology. Others believe that with new biological insights or the application of philosophical ideas, we can be confident that the species category exists. This paper offers a different approach to the species problem. We should be skeptical of the species category, but not skeptical of the existence of those (...)
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  40. Has Grafen Formalized Darwin?Jonathan Birch - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (2):175-180.
    One key aim of Grafen’s Formal Darwinism project is to formalize ‘modern biology’s understanding and updating of Darwin’s central argument’. In this commentary, I consider whether Grafen has succeeded in this aim.
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  41.  59
    Modeling Causal Structures: Volterra’s Struggle and Darwin’s Success.Raphael Scholl & Tim Räz - 2013 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 3 (1):115-132.
    The Lotka–Volterra predator-prey-model is a widely known example of model-based science. Here we reexamine Vito Volterra’s and Umberto D’Ancona’s original publications on the model, and in particular their methodological reflections. On this basis we develop several ideas pertaining to the philosophical debate on the scientific practice of modeling. First, we show that Volterra and D’Ancona chose modeling because the problem in hand could not be approached by more direct methods such as causal inference. This suggests a philosophically insightful motivation for (...)
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  42. Conscience and Conflict: Darwin, Freud, and the Origins of Human Aggression.Jim Hopkins - 2004 - In Dylan Evans & Pierre Cruse (eds.), Emotion, Evolution, and Rationality. Oxford University Press.
  43.  40
    “A Great Complication of Circumstances” – Darwin and the Economy of Nature.Trevor Pearce - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (3):493-528.
    In 1749, Linnaeus presided over the dissertation "Oeconomia Naturae," which argued that each creature plays an important and particular role in nature 's economy. This phrase should be familiar to readers of Darwin, for he claims in the Origin that "all organic beings are striving, it may be said, to seize on each place in the economy of nature." Many scholars have discussed the influence of political economy on Darwin's ideas. In this paper, I take a different tack, (...)
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  44.  44
    Before Darwin: Transformist Concepts in European Natural History. [REVIEW]Pietro Corsi - 2005 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (1):67 - 83.
    Lack of consideration of the complex European scientific scene from the late 18th century to the mid-decades of the 19th century has produced partial and often biased reconstructions of priorities, worries, implicit and explicit philosophical and at times political agendas characterizing the early debates on species. It is the purpose of this paper firstly to critically assess some significant attempts at broadening the historiographic horizon concerning the immediate context to Darwin's intellectual enterprise, and to devote the second part to (...)
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  45.  30
    Charles Darwin’s Theory of Moral Sentiments: What Darwin’s Ethics Really Owes to Adam Smith.Greg Priest - 2017 - Journal of the History of Ideas 78 (4):571-593.
    When we read On the Origin of Species, we cannot help but hear echoes of the Wealth of Nations. Darwin’s “economy of nature” features a “division of labour” that leads to complexity and productivity. We should not, however, analyze Darwin’s ethics through this lens. Darwin did not draw his economic ideas from Smith, nor did he base his ethics on an economic foundation. Darwin’s ethics rest on Smith’s notion—from the Theory of Moral Sentiments—of an innate human (...)
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  46. Nietzsche’s Aesthetic Critique of Darwin.Charles H. Pence - 2011 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 33 (2):165-190.
    Despite his position as one of the first philosophers to write in the “post- Darwinian” world, the critique of Darwin by Friedrich Nietzsche is often ignored for a host of unsatisfactory reasons. I argue that Nietzsche’s critique of Darwin is important to the study of both Nietzsche’s and Darwin’s impact on philosophy. Further, I show that the central claims of Nietzsche’s critique have been broadly misunderstood. I then present a new reading of Nietzsche’s core criticism of (...). An important part of Nietzsche’s response can best be understood as an aesthetic critique of Darwin, reacting to what he saw as Darwin having drained life of an essential component of objective aesthetic value. For Nietzsche, Darwin’s theory is false because it is too intellectual, because it searches for rules, regulations, and uniformity in a realm where none of these are to be found – and, moreover, where they should not be found. Such a reading goes furthest toward making Nietzsche’s criticism substantive and relevant. Finally, I attempt to relate this novel explanation of Nietzsche’s critique to topics in contemporary philosophy of biology, particularly work on the evolutionary explanation of culture. (shrink)
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  47. Philosophical Reflections on Darwin and Evolutionary Theory. [REVIEW]Massimo Pigliucci - 2012 - Trends in Ecology and Evolution 27 (5):258.
    Few scientists are conscious of the distinc- tion between the logic of what they write and the rhetoric of how they write it. This is because we are taught to write scientific papers and books from a third-person per- spective, using as impersonal (and, almost inevitably, boring [1]) a style as possible. The first chapter in Elliott Sober’s new book examines the difference between Darwin’s logic and his rhetoric in The Origin, and manages to teach some interesting and in- (...)
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  48.  79
    Modus Darwin.Elliott Sober - 1999 - Biology and Philosophy 14 (2):253-278.
    Modus Darwin is a principle of inference that licenses the conclusion that two species have a common ancestor, based on the observation that they are similar. The present paper investigates the principle's probabilistic foundations.
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  49.  62
    Darwin's Concept of Final Cause: Neither New nor Trivial. [REVIEW]T. L. Short - 2002 - Biology and Philosophy 17 (3):323-340.
    Darwin'suse of final cause accords with the Aristotelian idea of finalcauses as explanatory types – as opposed to mechanical causes, which arealways particulars. In Wright's consequence etiology, anadaptation is explained by particular events, namely, its past consequences;hence, that etiology is mechanistic at bottom. This justifies Ghiselin'scharge that such versions of teleology trivialize the subject, But a purelymechanistic explanation of an adaptation allows it to appear coincidental.Patterns of outcome, whether biological or thermodynamic, cannot be explainedbytracing causal chains, even were that (...)
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  50.  82
    Darwin's Language May Seem Teleological, but His Thinking is Another Matter.Michael T. Ghiselin - 1994 - Biology and Philosophy 9 (4):489-492.
    Darwin''s biology was teleological only if the term teleology is defined in a manner that fails to recognize his contribution to the metaphysics and epistemology of modern science. His use of teleological metaphors in a strictly teleonomic context is irrelevant to the meaning of his discourse. The myth of Darwin''s alleged teleology is partly due to misinterpretations of discussions about whether morphology should be a purely formal science. Merely rejecting such notions as special creation and vitalism does not (...)
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