11 found
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  1.  37
    Going Social with Constitutivism.David A. Borman - 2015 - Philosophical Forum 46 (2):205-225.
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  2. Labour, Exchange and Recognition: Marx Contra Honneth.David A. Borman - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (8):935-959.
    This article explores Marx’s contention that the achievement of full personhood and, not just consequently, but simultaneously, of genuine intersubjectivity depends upon the attainment of recognition for one’s place in the social division of labour, recognition which is systematically denied to some individuals and groups of individuals through the capitalist organization of production and exchange. This reading is then employed in a critique of Axel Honneth’s theory of recognition which, it is argued, cannot account for the systematic obstacles faced by (...)
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  3.  54
    Betrayal in Teaching: Persuasion in Kierkegaard, Theory and Performance. [REVIEW]David A. Borman - 2006 - Continental Philosophy Review 39 (3):245-272.
    This paper explores the relationship between Kierkegaard's theory of “indirect communication,” his employment of that method in the pseudonymous literature, and his explicit comments on the Teacher in Philosophical Fragments. My interest is principally in a pedagogical method able to serve as a solution to the problem of will formation, and so my assessment of Kierkegaard's theory and performance is essentially ethical in nature. I argue that there is at least an ambiguity, if not a contradiction, to be found in (...)
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  4.  45
    Bullshit, Social Integration, and Political Legitimation: Habermasian Reflections: Dialogue.David A. Borman - 2011 - Dialogue 50 (1):117-140.
    ABSTRACT: This paper proposes a Habermasian analysis of bullshit which diverges from the well-known account offered by Harry Frankfurt. It aims to show that Habermas’s theory of communicative action provides superior conceptual tools for such an analysis, but also that the phenomenon of bullshit ought to be deeply troubling to Habermasians. Bullshit frustrates the transition to discourse, interrupts the binding force of communicative action and, if sufficiently widespread as to alter fundamental attitudes toward public speech, bullshit challenges the status of (...)
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  5.  13
    The Idolatry of the Actual: Habermas, Socialization, and the Possibility of Autonomy.David A. Borman - 2011 - State University of New York Press.
  6.  1
    Bourgeois Illusions: Honneth on the Ruling Ideas of Capitalist Societies.David A. Borman - 2019 - In Volker Schmitz (ed.), Axel Honneth and the Critical Theory of Recognition. Springer Verlag. pp. 97-124.
    Axel Honneth—and sympathetic critics on his behalf – have argued that his mature work can be understood as “the attempt to provide a consistent theoretical model to extend” the insights of critical historians and sociologists, like E.P. Thompson and Barrington Moore, Jr., whose work formed an important point of departure for Honneth’s early research. This chapter attempts to demonstrate the contrary: that Honneth’s middle and most recent writings represents an abandonment of the basic convictions of his own earlier work, which (...)
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  7.  44
    Contractualism and the Right to Strike.David A. Borman - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (1):81-98.
    This paper explores the moral and legal status of the right to strike from a contractualist perspective, broadly construed. I argue that rather than attempting to ground the right to strike in the principle of association, as is commonly done in the ongoing legal debate, it ought to be understood as the assertion of a second-order moral right to self-determination within economic life. The controversy surrounding the right to strike thus reflects and depends upon a more basic question of the (...)
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  8.  30
    First-Personal Moral Testimony: A Defence.David A. Borman - 2020 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 23 (1):163-179.
    Several authors have discussed and defended what is sometimes called the Asymmetry Thesis in social epistemology: that while reliance on testimony is essentially incontrovertible in epistemology, it is uniquely problematic for moral knowledge. This conclusion results, I argue, from considering the wrong sort of moral testimony: namely, ‘third-personal’ rather than ‘first-personal’ testimony. First-personal moral testimony is an inescapable part of the constitution of legitimate moral norms, and its role cannot be deflated as a form of mere information to be taken (...)
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  9.  18
    Protest, Parasitism, and Community.David A. Borman - 2015 - Social Philosophy Today 31:7-22.
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  10.  25
    To Give in the Name, or to Give Without Names: Derrida, the Gift, and the Giving of Alms.David A. Borman - 2005 - Philosophy Today 49 (2):145-155.
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  11. The Idolatry of the Actual: Habermas, Socialization, and the Possibility of Autonomy.David A. Borman - 2012 - State University of New York Press.
    _Reinvigorates Jürgen Habermas’ early critical theory._.
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