10 found
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  1.  17
    Introduction: The Laboratory of Nature – Science in the Mountains.Charlotte Bigg, David Aubin & Philipp Felsch - 2009 - Science in Context 22 (3):311-321.
  2.  41
    The Withering Immortality of Nicolas Bourbaki: A Cultural Connector at the Confluence of Mathematics, Structuralism, and the Oulipo in France.David Aubin - 1997 - Science in Context 10 (2):297-342.
    The group of mathematicians known as Bourbaki persuasively proclaimed the isolation of its field of research – pure mathematics – from society and science. It may therefore seem paradoxical that links with larger French cultural movements, especially structuralism and potential literature, are easy to establish. Rather than arguing that the latter were a consequence of the former, which they were not, I show that all of these cultural movements, including the Bourbakist endeavor, emerged together, each strengthening the public appeal of (...)
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  3.  8
    The Elusive Placelessness of the Mont-Blanc Observatory : The Social Underpinnings of High-Altitude Observation. [REVIEW]Stéphane Le Gars & David Aubin - 2009 - Science in Context 22 (3):509-531.
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  4.  6
    The Hotel That Became an Observatory: Mount Faulhorn as Singularity, Microcosm, and Macro-Tool.David Aubin - 2009 - Science in Context 22 (3):365-386.
    ArgumentOne of the first high-altitude observatories was a hotel. Established in 1823, the chalet on Mount Faulhorn became a highpoint of nineteenth-century science. In this paper, I take this mountain as my entry point into the examination of the special attraction that mountains exerted on scientists. I argue that Mount Faulhorn stood for three different conceptions of the usefulness of the mountain in science: in observation networks, stations were usually chosen for pragmatic rather than scientific reasons, but mountains representedsingularspots in (...)
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  5.  31
    The Cipher of the Zodiac: Jed Z. Buchwald and Diane Greco Josefowicz: The Zodiac of Paris: How an Improbable Controversy Over an Ancient Egyptian Artifact Provoked a Modern Debate Between Religion and Science. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010, Vi+428pp, $35.00, £24.95 HB.Robert Fox, Charles C. Gillispie, Theresa Levitt, David Aubin, Jed Z. Buchwald & Diane Greco Josefowicz - 2012 - Metascience 21 (3):509-530.
    The cipher of the zodiac Content Type Journal Article Category Book Symposium Pages 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s11016-012-9674-1 Authors Robert Fox, Faculty of History, Oxford University, George Street, Oxford, OX1 2RL UK Charles C. Gillispie, Program in History of Science, Department of History, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA Theresa Levitt, Department of History, University of Mississippi, 310 Bishop Hall, University, MS 38677, USA David Aubin, Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Histoire des sciences mathématique, UPMC - case postale 247, 4, place Jussieu, (...)
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  6.  11
    Modèles de scientificité dans les observatoires : les églises de l’'ge positiviste?David Aubin - 2013 - Revue des Sciences Religieuses 87:451-461.
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  7.  3
    Ballistics, Fluid Mechanics, and Air Resistance at G'vre, 1829–1915: Doctrine, Virtues, and the Scientific Method in a Military Context.David Aubin - 2017 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 71 (6):509-542.
    In this paper, we investigate the way in which French artillery engineers met the challenge of air drag in the nineteenth century. This problem was especially acute following the development of rifled barrels, when projectile initial velocities reached values much higher than the speed of sound in air. In these circumstances, the Newtonian approximation according to which the drag was a force proportional to the square of the velocity was not nearly good enough to account for experimental results. This prompted (...)
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  8.  4
    James Lequeux. François Arago: A 19th Century French Humanist and Pioneer in Astrophysics. Xv + 334 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. New York: Springer, 2015. $129. [REVIEW]David Aubin - 2016 - Isis 107 (4):856-857.
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  9.  3
    Amir Alexander. Duel at Dawn: Heroes, Martyrs, and the Rise of Modern Mathematics. 307 Pp., Illus., Index. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2010. $28.95. [REVIEW]David Aubin - 2011 - Isis 102 (1):139-140.
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  10.  53
    ‘The Memory of Life Itself’: Bénard’s Cells and the Cinematography of Self-Organization.David Aubin - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (3):359-369.
    In 1900, the physicist Henri Bénard exhibited the spontaneous formation of cells in a layer of liquid heated from below. Six or seven decades later, drastic reinterpretations of this experiment formed an important component of ‘chaos theory’. This paper therefore is an attempt at writing the history of this experiment, its long neglect and its rediscovery. It examines Bénard’s experiments from three different perspectives. First, his results are viewed in the light of the relation between experimental and mathematical approaches in (...)
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