59 found
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  1. Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming Into Existence.David Benatar - 2006 - New York ;Oxford University Press.
    Better Never to Have Been argues for a number of related, highly provocative, views: (1) Coming into existence is always a serious harm. (2) It is always wrong to have children. (3) It is wrong not to abort fetuses at the earlier stages of gestation. (4) It would be better if, as a result of there being no new people, humanity became extinct. These views may sound unbelievable--but anyone who reads Benatar will be obliged to take them seriously.
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  2. Still Better Never to Have Been: A Reply to (More of) My Critics. [REVIEW]David Benatar - 2013 - Journal of Ethics 17 (1-2):121-151.
    In Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming into Existence, I argued that coming into existence is always a harm and that procreation is wrong. In this paper, I respond to those of my critics to whom I have not previously responded. More specifically, I engage the objections of Tim Bayne, Ben Bradley, Campbell Brown, David DeGrazia, Elizabeth Harman, Chris Kaposy, Joseph Packer and Saul Smilansky.
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  3. Taking Humour (Ethics) Seriously, But Not Too Seriously.David Benatar - 2014 - Journal of Practical Ethics 2 (1):24-43.
    Humour is worthy of serious ethical consideration. However, it is often taken far too seriously. In this paper, it is argued that while humour is sometimes unethical, it is wrong much less often than many people think. Non-contextual criticisms, which claim that certain kinds of humour are always wrong, are rejected. Contextual criticisms, which take issue with particular instances of humour rather than types of humour, are more promising. However, it is common to overstate the number of contexts in which (...)
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  4. Procreation and Parenthood: The Ethics of Bearing and Rearing Children.David Archard & David Benatar (eds.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Procreation and Parenthood offers new and original essays by leading philosophers on some of the main ethical issues raised by these activities.
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  5.  56
    Between Prophylaxis and Child Abuse: The Ethics of Neonatal Male Circumcision.Michael Benatar & David Benatar - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):35-48.
    Opinion about neonatal male circumcision is deeply divided. Some take it to be a prophylactic measure with unequivocal and significant health benefits, while others consider it a form of child abuse. We argue against both these polar views. In doing so, we discuss whether circumcision constitutes bodily mutilation, whether the absence of the child's informed consent makes it wrong, the nature and strength of the evidence regarding medical harms and benefits, and what moral weight cultural considerations have. We conclude that (...)
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  6. Why It Is Better Never to Come Into Existence.David Benatar - 1997 - American Philosophical Quarterly 34 (3):345 - 355.
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  7. Two Views of Sexual Ethics: Promiscuity Pedophilia, and Rape.David Benatar - forthcoming - Public Affairs Quarterly.
  8.  24
    The Trouble with Universal Declarations.David Benatar - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):220–224.
    ABSTRACTA number of problems plague universal declarations. To the extent that those drafting and adopting the declaration represent a range of different views, consensus can only be obtained if the declaration makes minimalist claims that all can support, or makes claims that are vague enough that they can be interpreted to everybody's satisfaction. To the extent that a universal declaration avoids these problems, and takes an unequivocal and controversial stand, it does so by privileging the view that is hegemonic . (...)
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  9. The Unbearable Lightness of Bringing Into Being.David Benatar - 1999 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):173–180.
  10.  94
    The Gendered Conference Campaign: A Critique.David Benatar - 2015 - Philosophia 43 (1):13-23.
    The Gendered Conference Campaign seeks to reduce the prevalence of conferences at which the keynote speakers are all male. Such conferences, according to proponents of the campaign, stereotype philosophy as male, contribute to implicit bias against women and perpetuate stereotype threat. I argue, first, that if a more diverse list of keynote speakers were the correct way to counter harms such as implicit bias and stereotype threat, then a Gendered Conference Campaign would not be the solution. The campaign would need (...)
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  11. No Life is Good.David Benatar - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 53 (53):62-66.
    The worst pains seem to be worse than the best pleasures are good. Anybody who doubts this should consider what choice they would make if they wereoffered the option of securing an hour of the most sublime pleasures possible in exchange for suffering an hour of the worst pain possible.
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  12. The Optimism Delusion.David Benatar - 2008 - Think 6 (16):19.
    In the first of our three pieces responding to Richard Dawkins's The God Delusion, David Benatar suggests that Dawkins is preaching.
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  13. What's God Got to Do with It? Atheism and Religious Practice.David Benatar - 2006 - Ratio 19 (4):383–400.
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  14.  74
    A Pain in the Fetus: Toward Ending Confusion About Fetal Pain.David Benatar & Michael Benatar - 2001 - Bioethics 15 (1):57–76.
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  15.  12
    Forsaking Wisdom.David Benatar - 2016 - The Philosophers' Magazine 72:23-24.
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  16.  37
    A First Name Basis?David Benatar - 2011 - Think 10 (29):51-57.
    Many societies are now characterized by much more informality than they were before. One manifestation of this is that whereas children would previously address adults more deferentially , they are now much more likely to call adults by their first names. The same is true of younger adults addressing considerably older adults. Is this greater familiarity acceptable or should it be avoided?
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  17.  86
    Unscientific Ethics: Science and Selective Ethics.David Benatar - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (1):30-32.
  18.  30
    Prejudice in Jest: When Racial and Gender Humor Harms.David Benatar - 1999 - Public Affairs Quarterly 13 (2):191-203.
  19.  98
    Corporal Punishment.David Benatar - 1998 - Social Theory and Practice 24 (2):237-260.
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  20.  33
    3:2 Target Article Authors Respond to Commentators: How Not to Argue About Circumcision.David Benatar & Michael Benatar - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):1 – 9.
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  21.  54
    Cartoons and Consequences.David Benatar - 2008 - Think 6 (17-18):53-57.
    Philosophical debate over the infamous Danish cartoons of Muhammad continues.
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  22.  72
    There's No Method in the Badness.David Benatar - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (3):174-174.
  23.  52
    A Storm in a Turban.David Benatar - 2006 - Think 5 (13):17-22.
    Did those who published the cartoons of Muhammad do something wrong?
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  24.  53
    The Wrong of Wrongful Life.David Benatar - 2000 - American Philosophical Quarterly 37 (2):175 - 183.
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  25.  48
    Pedophilia.David Benatar - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  26.  37
    The Second Sexism.David Benatar - 2003 - Social Theory and Practice 29 (2):177-210.
  27.  66
    To Be or Not to Have Been?David Benatar - 2001 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (2):255-266.
    Most people think that their coming into existence benefited them. This paper reports on and analyses a study that shows that most people, when making such a judgement, do not really consider the counterfactual case -- the scenario in which they never come into existence. Because proper consideration is not given to both options, the ranking of one over the other is not an appropriately informed judgement. The preference for having come into existence is thus a profoundly unreliable indicator of (...)
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  28.  38
    A First Name Basis?–Erratum.David Benatar - 2012 - Think 11 (30):115-115.
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  29.  41
    Christine Overall: Why Have Children? The Ethical Debate. [REVIEW]David Benatar - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):583-585.
    The prevailing view about procreation, Christine Overall observes, is that “having children is the default position; not having children is what requires explanation and justification” (p. 3). These assumptions, she says, “are the opposite of what they ought to be” and that the “burden of proof … should rest primarily on those who choose to have children” (ibid). The ostensible goal of Why Have Children? is to discuss when this burden is and is not met.Professor Overall’s conclusions are much less (...)
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  30.  62
    The Owl and the Ostrich: Reply to Sami Pihlström on Ethical Unthinkabilities and Philosophical Seriousness.David Benatar - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (5):605-616.
    Sami Pihlström argues in his “Ethical Unthinkabilities and Philosophical Seriousness” that there are some philosophical views that are so dangerous that we should not discuss them. He advances this argument with special reference to my (anti-natalist) view that being brought into existence is always a serious harm. In response I argue: (a) that there are major flaws in his argument for the conclusion that we should not think about (purportedly) unthinkable views; and (b) that my views about the harm of (...)
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  31.  36
    Second Sexism.David Benatar - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 58:19-20.
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  32.  33
    Sexist Language: Alternatives to the Alternatives.David Benatar - 2005 - Public Affairs Quarterly 19 (1):1-9.
  33. The Limits of Reproductive Freedom.David Benatar - 2010 - In David Archard & David Benatar (eds.), Procreation and Parenthood: The Ethics of Bearing and Rearing Children. Oxford University Press.
     
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  34.  71
    Jonathan Glover, Choosing Children: The Ethical Dilemmas of Genetic Intervention. [REVIEW]David Benatar - 2007 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):227-228.
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  35.  18
    To Be or Not to Have Been?: Defective Counterfactual Reasoning About One’s Own Existence.David Benatar - 2001 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (2):255-266.
    Most people think that their coming into existence benefited them. This paper reports on and analyses a study that shows that most people, when making such a judgement, do not really consider the counterfactual case -- the scenario in which they never come into existence. Because proper consideration is not given to both options, the ranking of one over the other is not an appropriately informed judgement. The preference for having come into existence is thus a profoundly unreliable indicator of (...)
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  36.  41
    Choosing Tomorrow's Children.David Benatar - 2011 - Social Theory and Practice 37 (3):524-530.
  37.  24
    Procreative Permissiveness.David Benatar - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (5):417-418.
  38.  13
    Non-Therapeutic Pediatric Interventions.David Benatar - 2008 - In Peter A. Singer & A. M. Viens (eds.), The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics. Cambridge University Press.
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  39.  13
    Following is the Comprehensive Index for Volume 37 of the Hastings Center Report, Covering All Feature Material From 2007. Letters Have Not Been Included. Ffl Complete Issues Are Available for Volume 37 (2007) and May Be Purchased for $16.00 Each, Plus Shipping. Please Contact the Circulation Department, The Hastings Center, 21 Malcolm Gordon Road, Garrison, NY 10524; Tel.:(845) 424-4040; Fax:(845) 424-4545; E-Mail: Publications@ Thehastingscenter. Org. [REVIEW]Peter C. Adamson, Carmen Paradis, Martin L. Smith, Nicholas Agar, Jacob M. Appel, David Benatar, Nancy Berlinger, Daniel Brudney, Lucy M. Candib & Arthur L. Caplan - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37.
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  40.  18
    How Does Anybody Live in This Strange Place? A Reply to Samantha Vice.David Benatar - 2012 - South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):619-361.
    This article builds on Samantha Vice’s argument on the problem of whiteness in contemporary South Africa. I will explore the thesis of invisibility regarding whiteness and argue for its relevance to the rich per se. This thesis demonstrates how white privilege and affluence, despite being glaringly visible in a concrete sense, is rendered invisible together with the mostly black poverty by which it is contrasted. The invisibility of whiteness translates and flows into the so-called ‘invisibility of richness’, which involves anyone (...)
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  41.  26
    The Second Sexism, a Second Time.David Benatar - 2003 - Social Theory and Practice 29 (2):275-296.
  42.  14
    Creation Ethics: Reproduction, Genetics, and the Quality of Life, by David DeGrazia.David Benatar - 2014 - Mind 123 (490):585-588.
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  43.  26
    Hugh LaFollette and Niall Shanks, Brute Science: Dilemmas of Animal Experimentation:Brute Science: Dilemmas of Animal Experimentation.David Benatar - 1999 - Ethics 110 (1):207-211.
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  44.  4
    Taking Humour Seriously, but Not Too Seriously.David Benatar - unknown
    Humour is worthy of serious ethical consideration. However, it is often taken far too seriously. In this paper, it is argued that while humour is sometimes unethical, it is wrong much less often than many people think. Non-contextual criticisms, which claim that certain kinds of humour are always wrong, are rejected. Contextual criticisms, which take issue with particular instances of humour rather than types of humour, are more promising. However, it is common to overstate the number of contexts in which (...)
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  45.  12
    Evaluations of Circumcision Should Be Circumscribed by the Evidence.David Benatar - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (7):431-432.
    One common mistake in discussions about the ethics of infant male circumcisioni is to attempt to answer the question of the practice's permissibility by appealing to general principles and bypassing the empirical evidence about purported benefits and harms of the practice.Joseph Mazor1 avoids the mistake of appealing only to general principles. He correctly argues that it is not sufficient to invoke a child's right to bodily integrity or to self-determinationii. Moreover, he does not appeal to parents’ rights to religious or (...)
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  46. 3: 2 Target Article Authors Respond to Commentators.David Benatar & Michael Benatar - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2).
     
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  47.  3
    Referees for Volume 7.Andrew Altman, Michael Barnhart, Avner Baz, David Benatar, Yitzhak Benbaji, Talia Bettcher, Brian Bix, Jeffrey Bland-Ballard & Lene Bomann-Larsen - 2010 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (4):541-542.
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  48.  1
    No Life is Good.David Benatar - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 53:62-66.
    The worst pains seem to be worse than the best pleasures are good. Anybody who doubts this should consider what choice they would make if they wereoffered the option of securing an hour of the most sublime pleasures possible in exchange for suffering an hour of the worst pain possible.
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  49. Choosing Tomorrow’s Children: The Ethics of Selective Reproduction. [REVIEW]David Benatar - 2011 - Social Theory and Practice 37 (3):524-530.
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  50. Cutting to the Core: Exploring the Ethics of Contested Surgeries.David Benatar (ed.) - 2006 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    When the benefits of surgery do not outweigh the harms or where they do not clearly do so, surgical interventions become morally contested. Cutting to the Core examines a number of such surgeries, including infant male circumcision and cutting the genitals of female children, the separation of conjoined twins, surgical sex assignment of intersex children and the surgical re-assignment of transsexuals, limb and face transplantation, cosmetic surgery, and placebo surgery.
     
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