Results for 'David Biro'

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  1.  38
    The Editor and the Associate Editors Thank the Consulting Editors, the Members of the Editorial Board and the Following Philosophers for Their Help with Refereeing Papers During the Period July 1994 to June 1995. Adeney, Douglas Kennett, Jeanette Agar, Nicholas Lamarque, Peter. [REVIEW]David Armstrong, Rae Langton, Robert Audi, Jerrold Levinson, John Bacon, David Lewis, Rick Benitez, Gary Malinas, John Biro & Jeff Malpas - 1995 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (4).
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  2.  62
    An Anatomy of Illness.David Biro - 2012 - Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (1):41-54.
    Because it focuses primarily on the sick body (disease), medicine ignores many of the concerns and needs of sick people. By listening to the stories of patients in the clinic, on the Internet, and in published book form, health care providers could gain a better understanding of the impact of disease on the person (illness), what it means to patients over and above their physical symptoms and what they might require over and above surgery or chemotherapy. Only by familiarizing themselves (...)
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  3.  15
    Begging the Question as Involving Actual Belief and Inconceivable Without It.David H. Sanford - 1988 - Metaphilosophy 19 (1):32–37.
    This article answers John Biro's "Knowability, Believability, and Begging the Question: a Reply to Sanford" in "Metaphilosophy" 15 (1984). Biro and I agree that of two argument instances with the same form and content, one but not the other can beg the question, depending on other factors. These factors include actual beliefs, or so I maintain (against Biro) with the help of some analysed examples. Brief selections from Archbishop Whatley and J S Mill suggest that they also (...)
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  4.  38
    Begging the Question: A Case Study. [REVIEW]Juho Ritola - 2003 - Argumentation 17 (1):1-19.
    The essay starts by presenting two accounts of begging the question, John Biro's epistemic account and David Sanford's doxastic account. After briefly comparing these accounts, the essay will study an argument suspected of begging the question and subsequently apply the epistemic and doxastic accounts to this test case. It is found that the accounts of Biro and Sanford do not analyse the test case adequately, therefore a new account is developed using the idea of a knowledge-base.
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  5.  24
    Doing Philosophy Historically.Peter H. Hare (ed.) - 1988 - Prometheus Books.
    Can original philosophy be done while simultaneously engaging in the history of philosophy? Such a possibility is questioned by analytic philosophers who contend that history contaminates good philosophy, and by historians of philosophy who insist that theoretical predecessors cannot be ignored. Believing that both camps are misguided, the contributors to this book present a case for historical philosophy as a valuable enterprise. The contributors include: Todd L. Adams, Lilli Alanen, Jos? Bernardete, Jonathan Bennett, John I. Biro, Phillip Cummins, Georges (...)
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  6.  23
    Wilson on Circular Arguments.J. Ritola - 2001 - Argumentation 15 (3):295-312.
    This paper criticizes Kent Wilson's (`Circular Arguments', 1988) arguments against the analysis of the fallacy of begging the question in epistemic terms and against the division of the fallacy into equivalence and dependency types. It is argued that Wilson does not succeed in showing that the epistemic attitude to the fallacy analysis should be given up. Further, it is argued that Wilson's arguments against the division of the fallacy into two types can be overcome by altering the accounts he criticizes (...)
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  7.  37
    The Epistemic Inferiority of Pragma-Dialectics – Reply to Botting.Christoph Lumer - 2012 - Informal Logic 32 (1):51-82.
    In a recent paper in this journal, David Botting defended pragma-dialectics against epistemological criticisms by exponents of the epistemological approach to argumentation, i.e. Harvey Siegel, John Biro and me. In particular, Botting tries to justify with new arguments a Functional Claim, that the function of argumentation is to resolve disputes, and a Normative Claim, that standpoints that have the unqualified consensus of all participants in a dispute will generally be epistemically sound. In this reply it is shown that (...)
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  8.  45
    Referring, Demonstrating, and Intending.Rod Bertholet - 1986 - Philosophy Research Archives 12:251-260.
    Demonstratives have been thought to provide counterexamples to theories which analyze the notion of speaker reference in terms of the intentions of the speaker. This paper is a response to three attempts to undermine my efforts to defend such theories against these putative counterexamples. It is argued that the efforts of Howard Wettstein, M. J. More and John L. Biro to show that my own attempt to defuse the putative counterexamples offered by David Kaplan fails, are themselves unsuccessful. (...)
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  9. David Hume, Contractarian.David Gauthier - 1979 - Philosophical Review 88 (1):3-38.
  10.  3
    The Letters of David Hume: Volume 1.David Hume & J. Y. T. Greig (eds.) - 1932 - Clarendon Press.
    This classic edition presents the correspondence of one of the great thinkers of the 18th century, and offers a rich picture of the man and his age. This first volume contains David Hume's letters from 1727 to 1765. Hume's correspondents include such famous public figures as Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Adam Smith, James Boswell, and Benjamin Franklin.
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  11. David Lewis and Schrodinger's Cat.David Papineau - 2004 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):153.
    In 'How Many Lives Has Schrödinger's Cat?' David Lewis argues that the Everettian no-collapse interpretation of quantum mechanics is in a tangle when it comes to probabilities. This paper aims to show that the difficulties that Lewis raises are insubstantial. The Everettian metaphysics contains a coherent account of probability. Indeed it accounts for probability rather better than orthodox metaphysics does.
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  12.  15
    The Cambridge Companion to Hume. [REVIEW]Dorothy Coleman - 1995 - Review of Metaphysics 48 (4):920-921.
    The first three essays by John Biro, Alexander Rosenberg, and Robert Fogelin, respectively, focus on Hume's project to develop a science of human nature that would provide a foundation for all other sciences. Biro shows that what unites Hume's science of human nature and twentieth-century cognitive sciences is their mutual commitment to explain the mind as one would any other natural phenomenon. Rosenberg traces Hume's influence on the development of philosophy of science to show how he came to (...)
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  13. Exchanging Reasons: Responses to Critics.Lilian Bermejo Luque - 2011 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 26 (3):329-346.
    Ofrezco respuestas a lo que considero son los aspectos más destacados de las críticas de John Biro, James Freeman, David Hitchcock, Robert Pinto, Harvey Siegel y Luis Vega al modelo normativo para la argumentación que he desarrollado en Giving Reasons. Cada respuesta se articula en torno a una cuestión principal, i.e., la distinción entre normatividad constitutiva y regulativa dentro de los modelos de la Teoría de la Argumentación, la evaluación semántica de la argumentación, el concepto de justificación, las (...)
     
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  14.  73
    Sobel, David. From Valuing to Value: A Defense of Subjectivism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 352. $85.00. [REVIEW]David Enoch - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):672-677.
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  15.  53
    David Hume: A Treatise of Human Nature (Two-Volume Set).David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) - 2007 - Clarendon Press.
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of Hume's Treatise, one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This set comprises the two volumes of texts and editorial material, which are also available for purchase separately. -/- David Hume (1711 - 1776) is one of the greatest of philosophers. Today he probably ranks highest of all British philosophers in terms of influence and philosophical standing. His philosophical work ranges across morals, the mind, metaphysics, epistemology, religion, and (...)
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  16.  31
    Rescuing ?Begging the Question?J. I. Biro - 1977 - Metaphilosophy 8 (4):257-271.
  17.  51
    I—David McNaughton and Piers Rawling: Descriptivism, Normativity and the Metaphysics of Reasons.David McNaughton & Piers Rawling - 2003 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):23-45.
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  18. Normativity and Judgement: David Papineau.David Papineau - 1999 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 73 (1):17-43.
    It is widely assumed that the normativity of conceptual judgement poses problems for naturalism. Thus John McDowell urges that 'The structure of the space of reasons stubbornly resists being appropriated within a naturalism that conceives nature as the realm of law' (1994, p 73). Similar sentiments have been expressed by many other writers, for example Robert Brandom (1994, p xiii) and Paul Boghossian (1989, p 548).
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  19. Critical Notice of David Armstrong, A Combinatorial Theory of Possibility.David Lewis - 1992 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 70 (2):211-224.
     
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  20.  99
    Epistemic Normativity, Argumentation, and Fallacies.Harvey Siegel & John Biro - 1997 - Argumentation 11 (3):277-292.
    In Biro and Siegel we argued that a theory of argumentation mustfully engage the normativity of judgments about arguments, and we developedsuch a theory. In this paper we further develop and defend our theory.
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  21.  21
    David Hume's Theory of Mind.David Owen & Daniel E. Flage - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (4):858.
  22.  25
    Knowability, Believability and Begging the Question: A Reply to Sanford.J. I. Biro - 1984 - Metaphilosophy 15 (3-4):239-247.
  23.  7
    David Hume: A Treatise of Human Nature: Volume 2: Editorial Material.David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of Hume's Treatise, one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This volume contains their account of how the Treatise was written and published; an explanation of how they established the text; an extensive set of annotations; and a detailed bibliography and index.
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  24.  31
    Utilitarianism and Prioritarianism II: David McCarthy.David Mccarthy - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (1):1-33.
    The priority view has become very popular in moral philosophy, but there is a serious question about how it should be formalized. The most natural formalization leads to ex post prioritarianism, which results from adding expected utility theory to the main ideas of the priority view. But ex post prioritarianism entails a claim which is too implausible for it to be a serious competitor to utilitarianism. In fact, ex post prioritarianism was probably never a genuine alternative to utilitarianism in the (...)
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  25.  42
    Realist-Expressivism: A Neglected Option for Moral Realism*: David Copp.David Copp - 2001 - Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (2):1-43.
    Moral realism and antirealist-expressivism are of course incompatible positions. They disagree fundamentally about the nature of moral states of mind, the existence of moral states of affairs and properties, and the nature and role of moral discourse. The central realist view is that a person who has or expresses a moral thought is thereby in, or thereby expresses, a cognitive state of mind; she has or expresses a belief that represents a moral state of affairs in a way that might (...)
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  26. David Hume Philosophical Historian.David Hume, David Fate Norton & Richard Henry Popkin - 1965 - Bobbs-Merrill.
  27. David Hume: "The Historian".David Wootton - 2009 - In David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Anne Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. Cambridge University Press. pp. 281--312.
     
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  28. The Ring of Gyges: Overridingness and the Unity of Reason*: David Copp.David Copp - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (1):86-106.
    Does morality override self-interest? Or does self-interest override morality? These questions become important in situations where there is conflict between the overall verdicts of morality and self-interest, situations where morality on balance requires an action that is contrary to our self-interest, or where considerations of self-interest on balance call for an action that is forbidden by morality. In situations of this kind, we want to know what we ought simpliciter to do. If one of these standpoints over-rides the other, then (...)
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  29.  18
    NORMATIVITY AND JUDGEMENT I–David Papineau.David Papineau - 1999 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):17-43.
  30.  1
    New Letters of David Hume.David Hume - 1954 - Garland.
  31.  30
    DAVID - Foundations of Ethics.W. David Ross - 1942 - Philosophical Review 51:417.
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  32.  90
    Let Them Eat Chances: Probability and Distributive Justice: David Wasserman.David Wasserman - 1996 - Economics and Philosophy 12 (1):29-49.
    Jon Elster reports that in 1940, and again in 1970, the U.S. draft lottery was challenged for falling short of the legally mandated ‘random selection’. On both occasions, the physical mixing of the lots appeared to be incomplete, since the birth dates were clustered in a way that would have been extremely unlikely if the lots were fully mixed. There appears to have been no suspicion on either occasion that the deficiency in the mixing was intended, known, or believed to (...)
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  33. Impartiality and Associative Duties: David O. Brink.David O. Brink - 2001 - Utilitas 13 (2):152-172.
    Consequentialism is often criticized for failing to accommodate impersonal constraints and personal options. A common consequentialist response is to acknowledge the anticonsequentialist intuitions but to argue either that the consequentialist can, after all, accommodate the allegedly recalcitrant intuitions or that, where accommodation is impossible, the recalcitrant intuition can be dismissed for want of an adequate philosophical rationale. Whereas these consequentialist responses have some plausibility, associational duties represent a somewhat different challenge to consequentialism, inasmuch as they embody neither impersonal constraints nor (...)
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  34.  36
    One‐Year‐Old Infants Use Teleological Representations of Actions Productively.Gergely Csibra, Szilvia Bíró, Orsolya Koós & György Gergely - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (1):111-133.
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  35.  35
    David Hull's Evolutionary Model for the Progress and Process of Science.David Oldroyd - 1990 - Biology and Philosophy 5 (4):473-487.
  36.  5
    Essays for David Wiggins: Identity, Truth, and Value.David Wiggins, Sabina Lovibond & S. G. Williams (eds.) - 1996 - Blackwell.
    A collection of 14 essays honoring the life and work of Oxford philosopher Wiggins touching on topics from ancient philosophy to ethics, metaphysics and the theory of meaning. The contributing scholars debate many of the seminal issues of Wiggins' work, including the determinancy of distinctness, relative identity, naturalism in ethics, logic and truth in moral judgments, and the practical wisdom of Aristotle. The collection uniquely features replies by Wiggins to each of the papers. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, (...)
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  37.  51
    The Polis and its Analogues in the Thought of Hannah Arendt: David L. Marshall.David L. Marshall - 2010 - Modern Intellectual History 7 (1):123-149.
    Criticized as a nostalgic anachronism by those who oppose her version of political theory and lauded as symbol of direct democratic participation by those who favor it, the Athenian polis features prominently in Hannah Arendt's account of politics. This essay traces the origin and development of Arendt's conception of the polis as a space of appearance from the early 1950s onward. It makes particular use of the Denktagebuch, Arendt's intellectual diary, in order to shed new light on the historicity of (...)
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  38.  89
    The Revolution of Moore and Russell: A Very British Coup?: David Bell.David Bell - 1999 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 44:193-209.
    The question I shall attempt to address in what follows is an essentially historical one, namely: Why did analytic philosophy emerge first in Cambridge, in the hands of G. E. Moore and Bertrand Russell, and as a direct consequence of their revolutionary rejection of the philosophical tenets that form the basis of British Idealism? And the answer that I shall try to defend is: it didn't. That is to say, the ‘analytic’ doctrines and methods which Moore and Russell embraced in (...)
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  39.  19
    II—David Owens: The Value of Duty.David Owens - 2012 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 86 (1):199-215.
  40.  48
    What is Evidence of Evidence Evidence Of?Fabio Lampert & John Biro - 2017 - Logos and Episteme 8 (2):195-206.
    Richard Feldman’s well-known principle about disagreement and evidence – usually encapsulated in the slogan, ‘evidence of evidence is evidence’, (EEE) – invites the question, what should a rational believer do when faced by such evidence, especially when the disagreement is with an epistemic peer? The question has been the subject of much controversy. However, it has been recently suggested both that the principle is subject to counterexamples and that it is trivial. If either is the case, the question of what (...)
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  41.  38
    I–David Charles.David Charles - 1999 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):205-223.
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  42.  50
    Wittgenstein, Heidegger and Humility: David E. Cooper.David E. Cooper - 1997 - Philosophy 72 (279):105-123.
    In 1929, doubtless to the discomfort of his logical positivist host Moritz Schlick, Wittgenstein remarked, ‘To be sure, I can understand what Heidegger means by Being and Angst ’ . I return to what Heidegger meant and Wittgenstein could understand later. I begin with that remark because it has had an instructive career. When the passage which it prefaced was first published in 1965, the editors left it out—presumably to protect a hero of ‘analytic’ philosophy from being compromised by an (...)
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  43. David Hume and the Suppression of 'Atheism'.David Berman - 1983 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (3):375-387.
  44.  34
    Omniprescient Agency: DAVID P. HUNT.David P. Hunt - 1992 - Religious Studies 28 (3):351-369.
    The principle that One cannot deliberate over what one already knows is going to happen, when suitably qualified, has seemed to many philosophers to be about as secure a truth as one is likely to find in this life.Fortunately, poses little restriction on human deliberation, since the conditions which would trigger its prohibition seldom arise for us: our knowledge of the future is intermittent at best, and those things of which we do have advance knowledge are not the sorts of (...)
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  45.  13
    David Hume's Invisible Hand in The Wealth of Nations: The Public Choice of Moral Information.David Levy - 1985 - Hume Studies 1985 (1):110-149.
  46. Comment on David Chalmers' "Probability and Propositions".David M. Braun - manuscript
    Propositions are the referents of the ‘that’-clauses that appear in the direct object positions of typical ascriptions of assertion, belief, and other binary cognitive relations. In that sense, propositions are the objects of those cognitive relations. Propositions are also the semantic contents (meanings, in one sense ) of declarative sentences, with respect to contexts. They are what sentences semantically express, with respect to contexts. Propositions also bear truth-values. The truth-value of a sentence, in a context, is the truth-value of the (...)
     
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  47.  17
    Isomorphic but Not Lower Base-Isomorphic Cylindric Algebras of Finite Dimension.Balázs Biró - 1989 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 30 (2):262-267.
  48.  49
    Moral Dealing: Contract, Ethics, and Reason.Contractarianism and Rational Choice: Essays on David Gauthier's Morals by Agreement.David Gauthier - 1993 - Philosophical Quarterly 43 (172):373-378.
  49.  16
    David Cesarani. Arthur Koestler: The Homeless Mind. X + 646 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. New York: Free Press, 1999. $30.David Kaiser - 2002 - Isis 93 (3):540-541.
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  50. Eudaimonism, Love and Friendship, and Political Community*: DAVID O. BRINK.David O. Brink - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (1):252-289.
    It is common to regard love, friendship, and other associational ties to others as an important part of a happy or flourishing life. This would be easy enough to understand if we focused on friendships based on pleasure, or associations, such as business partnerships, predicated on mutual advantage. For then we could understand in a straightforward way how these interpersonal relationships would be valuable for someone involved in such relationships just insofar as they caused her pleasure or causally promoted her (...)
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