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David C. Makinson [15]David Clement Makinson [2]
  1. The Paradox of the Preface.David C. Makinson - 1965 - Analysis 25 (6):205.
    By means of an example, shows the possibility of beliefs that are separately rational whilst together inconsistent.
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  2.  65
    Conditional Probability in the Light of Qualitative Belief Change.David C. Makinson - 2011 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 40 (2):121 - 153.
    We explore ways in which purely qualitative belief change in the AGM tradition throws light on options in the treatment of conditional probability. First, by helping see why it can be useful to go beyond the ratio rule defining conditional from one-place probability. Second, by clarifying what is at stake in different ways of doing that. Third, by suggesting novel forms of conditional probability corresponding to familiar variants of qualitative belief change, and conversely. Likewise, we explain how recent work on (...)
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  3.  40
    Parallel Interpolation, Splitting, and Relevance in Belief Change.George Kourousias & David C. Makinson - 2007 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 72 (3):994-1002.
    The splitting theorem says that any set of formulae has a finest representation as a family of letter-disjoint sets. Parikh formulated this for classical propositional logic, proved it in the finite case, used it to formulate a criterion for relevance in belief change, and showed that AGMpartial meet revision can fail the criterion. In this paper we make three further contributions. We begin by establishing a new version of the well-known interpolation theorem, which we call parallel interpolation, use it to (...)
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  4.  27
    On an Inferential Semantics for Classical Logic.David C. Makinson - 2014 - Logic Journal of the IGPL 22 (1):147-154.
    We seek a better understanding of why an inferential semantics devised by Tor Sandqvist yields full classical logic, by providing and analysing a direct proof via a suitable maximality construction.
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  5.  58
    Respecting Relevance in Belief Change.David C. Makinson & George Kourousias - 2006 - Análisis Filosófico 26 (1):53-61.
    In this paper dedicated to Carlos Alchourrón, we review an issue that emerged only after his death in 1996, but would have been of great interest to him: To what extent do the formal operations of AGM belief change respect criteria of relevance? A natural criterion was proposed in 1999 by Rohit Parikh, who observed that the AGM model does not always respect it. We discuss the pros and cons of this criterion, and explain how the AGM account may be (...)
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  6.  37
    Propositional Relevance Through Letter-Sharing: Review and Contribution.David C. Makinson - unknown
    The concept of relevance between classical propositional formulae, defined in terms of letter-sharing, has been around for a very long time. But it began to take on a fresh life in 1999 when it was reconsidered in the context of the logic of belief change. Two new ideas appeared in independent work of Odinaldo Rodrigues and Rohit Parikh. First, the relation of relevance was considered modulo the belief set under consideration, Second, the belief set was put in a canonical form, (...)
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  7.  24
    Friendliness and Sympathy in Logic.David C. Makinson - 2005 - In J. Y. Beziau (ed.), Logica Universalis. Birkhäuser Verlog. pp. 191--206.
    We define and examine a notion of logical friendliness, which is a broadening of the familiar notion of classical consequence. The concept is tudied first in its simplest form, and then in a syntax-independent version, which we call sympathy. We also draw attention to the surprising number of familiar notions and operations with which it makes contact, providing a new light in which they may be seen.
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  8.  24
    Friendliness for Logicians.David C. Makinson - 2005 - In Sergei Artemov, H. Barringer, A. S. D'Avila Garcez, L. C. Lamb & J. Woods (eds.), We Will Show Them! Essays in Honour of Dov Gabbay. London: College Publications. pp. 259-292.
    We define and examine a notion of logical friendliness, which is a broadening of the familiar notion of classical consequence. The concept is studied first in its simplest form, and then in a syntax-independent version, which we call sympathy. We also draw attention to the surprising number of familiar notions and operations with which it makes contact, providing a new light in which they may be seen.
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  9.  11
    Intelim Rules for Classical Connectives.David C. Makinson - 2014 - In .
    We investigate introduction and elimination rules for truth-functional connectives, focusing on the general questions of the existence, for a given connective, of at least one such rule that it satisfies, and the uniqueness of a connective with respect to the set of all of them. The answers are straightforward in the context of rules using general set/set sequents of formulae, but rather complex and asymmetric in the restricted context of set/formula sequents, as also in the intermediate set/formula-or-empty context.
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  10.  27
    Levels of Belief in Nonmonotonic Reasoning.David C. Makinson - 2009 - In Franz Huber & Christoph Schmidt-Petri (eds.), Degrees of Belief. Springer. pp. 341--354.
    Reviews the connections between different kinds of nonmonotonic logic and the general idea of varying degrees of belief.
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  11.  37
    Completeness Theorems, Representation Theorems: What's the Difference?David C. Makinson - unknown - Hommage À Wlodek: Philosophical Papers Dedicated to Wlodek Rabinowicz, Ed. Rønnow-Rasmussen Et Al. 2007.
    A discussion of the connections and differences between completeness and representation theorems in logic, with examples drawn from classical and modal logic, the logic of friendliness, and nonmonotonic reasoning.
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  12. Topics in Modern Logic.David Clement Makinson - 1973 - London: Methuen; Distributed by Harper & Row Publishers, Inc., Barnes and Noble Import Division.
  13.  8
    Advice to the Relevantist Policeman.David C. Makinson - 2013 - In Vit Punochar & Petr Svarny (eds.), The Logica Yearbook 2012. London, U.K.: College Publications. pp. 91-100.
    Relevance logic is ordinarily seen as a subsystem of classical logic under the translation that replaces arrows by horseshoes. If, however, we consider the arrow as an additional connective alongside the horseshoe and other classical connectives, another perspective emerges. Relevance logic, specifically the system R, may be seen as the output of a conservative extension of classical consequence into the language with arrow.
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  14.  21
    Logical Friendliness and Sympathy in Logic.David C. Makinson - 2005 - In J. Y. Beziau (ed.), Logica Universalis. Birkhäuser Verlog. pp. 191--205.
    Defines and examines a notion of logical friendliness, a broadening of the familiar notion of classical consequence. Also reviews familiar notions and operations with which friendliness makes contact, providing a new light in which they may be seen.
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  15.  12
    Relevance Logic as a Conservative Extension of Classical Logic.David C. Makinson - 2014 - In Sven Ove Hansson (ed.), David Makinson on Classical Methods for Non-Classical Problems. Series: Outstanding Contributions to Logic. New York: Springer.
    Relevance logic is ordinarily seen as a subsystem of classical logic under the translation that replaces arrows by horseshoes. If, however, we consider the arrow as an additional connective alongside the horseshoe, then another perspective emerges: the theses of relevance logic, specifically the system R, may also be seen as the output of a conservative extension of the relation of classical consequence. We describe two ways in which this may be done. One is by defining a suitable closure relation out (...)
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  16.  3
    Vantagens e limitações da abordagem ajdukiewicziana da Gramática.David C. Makinson - 1973 - Discurso 4 (4):155-166.
    Discusses the strong points and the limitations of Ajdukiewicz' approach to grammar.
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