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David C. Thomasma [121]David Charles Thomasma [1]
  1. Education of Ethics Committees.David C. Thomasma - 1994 - Bioethics Forum 10 (4):12-8.
     
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  2. The Christian Virtues in Medical Practice.Edmund D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma - 1996
     
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  3. Philosophy of Medicine as the Source for Medical Ethics.David C. Thomasma & Edmund D. Pellegrino - 1981 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):5-11.
    The article offers an approach to inquiry about, the foundation of medical ethics by addressing three areas of conceptual presupposition basic to medical ethical theory. First, medical ethics must presuppose a view about the nature of medicine. it is argued that the view required by a cogent medical morality entails that medicine be seen both as a healing relationship and as a practical art. Three ways in which medicine inherently involves values and valuation are presented as important, i.e., in being (...)
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  4. Telling the Truth to Patients: A Clinical Ethics Exploration.David C. Thomasma - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (3):375.
    In this essay I will examine why the truth is so important to human communication in general, the types of truth, and why truth is only a relative value. After those introductory points, I will sketch the ways in which the truth is overridden or trumped by other concerns in the clinical setting. I will then discuss cases that fall into five distinct categories. The conclusion emphasizes the importance of truth telling and its primacy among secondary goods in the healthcare (...)
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  5. Ensuring a Good Death.David C. Thomasma - 1997 - Bioethics Forum 13 (4):7-17.
     
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  6.  23
    Bioethics and International Human Rights.David C. Thomasma - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (4):295-306.
  7.  44
    Bioethics and International Human Rights.David C. Thomasma - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (4):295-306.
  8.  26
    Germ-Line Therapy to Cure Mitochondrial Disease: Protocol and Ethics of In Vitro Ovum Nuclear Transplantation.Donald S. Rubenstein, David C. Thomasma, Eric A. Schon & Michael J. Zinaman - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (3):316.
    The combination of genuine ethical concerns and fear of learning to use germ-line therapy for human disease must now be confronted. Until now, no established techniques were available to perform this treatment on a human. Through an integration of several fields of science and medicine, we have developed a nine step protocol at the germ-line level for the curative treatment of a genetic disease. Our purpose in this paper is to provide the first method to apply germ-line therapy to treat (...)
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  9. Why Philosophers Should Offer Ethics Consultations.David C. Thomasma - 1991 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (2).
    Considerable debate has occurred about the proper role of philosophers when offering ethics consultations. Some argue that only physicians or clinical experienced personnel should offer ethics consultations in the clinical setting. Others argue still further that philosophers are ill-equipped to offer such advice, since to do so rests on no social warrant, and violates the abstract and neutral nature of the discipline itself.I argue that philosophers not only can offer such consultations but ought to. To be a bystander when one's (...)
     
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  10.  67
    A Dialogue on Compassion and Supererogation in Medicine.David C. Thomasma & Thomasine Kushner - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (4):415.
    According to Frankena, “the moral point of view is what Alison Wilde and Heather Badcock did not have.” Most of us, however, are not such extreme examples. We are capable of the moral point of view, but we fail to take the necessary time or make the required efforts. We resist pulling ourselves from other distractions to focus on the plight of others and what we might do to ameliorate their suffering. Perhaps compassion is rooted in understanding what it is (...)
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  11. Human Life in the Balance.David C. Thomasma - 1990
     
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  12.  20
    Discontinuing Life Support in an Infant of a Drug-Addicted Mother: Whose Decision Is It?Renu Jain & David C. Thomasma - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (1):48-54.
    “Ethical dilemmas…are rarely simple and stark but are, instead, multifaceted, complex, and gut wrenching for parents and care givers alike.” This is never more the case than when one must treat vulnerable babies who are not, nor ever can be competent to offer us some guidance about that treatment. The ethical problems are heightened when the parents, or the single mother, are incompetent to make decisions themselves, for example, because of drug addiction. In such cases, when the baby is premature (...)
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  13.  40
    Proposing a New Agenda: Bioethics and International Human Rights.David C. Thomasma - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (3):299-310.
    Our global knowledge of different cultures and the diversity of values increases almost daily. New challenges arise for ethics. This is especially true in the field of bioethics because the technological progress of medicine throughout the world is causing dramatic interactions with traditionally held values. Science and technology are rapidly advancing beyond discussions and corresponding political struggles over human rights, leaving those debates behind. This rapid development of science is at odds with the principle of sustained development that calls for (...)
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  14.  15
    Philosophy of Medicine as the Source for Medical Ethics.David C. Thomasma & Edmund D. Pellegrino - 1981 - Metamedicine 2 (1):5-11.
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  15.  11
    Suffering and the Beneficent Community: Beyond Libertarianism.Erich H. Loewy & David C. Thomasma - 1991 - State University of New York Press.
    A detailed multi-disciplinary analysis of Sudan in the post-colonial era with a consideration of possibilities for the future.
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  16.  50
    A Dialogue On Species-Specific Rights: Humans And Animals In Bioethics.David C. Thomasma & Erich H. Loewy - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (4):435-444.
    At the end of the most violent century in human history, it is good to take stock of our commitments to human and other life forms, as well as to examine the rights and the duties that might flow from their biological makeup. Professor Thomasma and Professor Loewy have held a long-standing dialogue on whether there are moral differences between animals and humans. This dialogue was occasioned by a presentation Thomasma made some years ago at Loewy's invitation at the University (...)
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  17. Clinical Ethics as Medical Hermeneutics.David C. Thomasma - 1994 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (2).
    There are several branches of ethics. Clinical ethics, the one closest to medical decisionmaking, can be seen as a branch of medicine itself. In this view, clinical ethics is a unitary hermeneutics. Its rule is a guideline for unifying other theories of ethics in conjunction with the clinical context. Put another way, clinical ethics interprets the clinical situation in light of a balance of other values that, while guiding the decisionmaking process, also contributes to the very weighting of those values. (...)
     
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  18.  30
    Antifoundationalism and the Possibility of a Moral Philosophy of Medicine.David C. Thomasma - 1997 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2):127-143.
    The problem of developing a moral philosophy of medicine is explored in this essay. Among the challenges posed to this development are the general mistrust of moral philosophy and philosophy in general created by post-modernist philosophical and even anti-philosophical thinking. This reaction to philosophical systematization is usually called antifoundationalism. I distinguish different forms of antifoundationalism, showing that not all forms of their opposites, foundationalism, are alike, especially with regards to claims made about the certitude of moral thought. I conclude that (...)
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  19.  20
    The Ethics of Caring for Conjoined Twins: The Lakeberg Twins.David C. Thomasma, Jonathan Muraskas, Patricia A. Marshall, Thomas Myers, Paul Tomich & James A. O'Neill - 1996 - Hastings Center Report 26 (4):4-12.
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  20. Marketing Human Organs: The Autonomy Paradox.Patricia A. Marshall, David C. Thomasma & Abdallah S. Daar - 1996 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).
    The severe shortage of organs for transplantation and the continual reluctance of the public to voluntarily donate has prompted consideration of alternative strategies for organ procurement. This paper explores the development of market approaches for procuring human organs for transplantation and considers the social and moral implications of organ donation as both a gift of life and a commodity exchange. The problematic and paradoxical articulation of individual autonomy in relation to property rights and marketing human body parts is addressed. We (...)
     
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  21.  12
    Ethics Consultation Rules: A Comment on George J Agich.David C. Thomasma - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):46-47.
  22.  54
    Models of the Doctor-Patient Relationship and the Ethics Committee: Part One.David C. Thomasma - 1992 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (1):11.
    Past ages of medical care are condemned in modern philosophical and medical literature as being too paternalistic. The normal account of good medicine in the past was, indeed, paternalistic in an offensive way to modern persons. Imagine a Jean Paul Sartre going to the doctor and being treated without his consent or even his knowledge of what will transpire during treatment! From Hippocratic times until shortly after World War II, medicine operated in a closed, clubby manner. The knowledge learned in (...)
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  23. Helping and Healing Religious Commitment in Health Care.Edmund D. Pellegrino, David C. Thomasma & David G. Miller - 1997
     
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  24.  51
    Neonatal Viability in the 1990s: Held Hostage by Technology.Jonathan Muraskas, Patricia A. Marshall, Paul Tomich, Thomas F. Myers, John G. Gianopoulos & David C. Thomasma - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (2):160-170.
    The emergence of new obstetrical and neonatal technologies, as well as more aggressive clinical management, has significantly improved the survival of extremely low birth weight infants. This development has heightened concerns about the limits of viability. ELBW infants, weighing less than 1,000 grams and no larger than the palm of one's hand, are often described as of late twentieth century technology. Improved survivability of ELBW infants has provided opportunities for long-term follow-up. Information on their physical and emotional development contributes to (...)
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  25. Goodbye and Challenges.David C. Thomasma & B. Ingemar B. Lindahl - 1988 - Theoretical Medicine 9 (3):245.
     
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  26.  19
    Models of the Doctor-Patient Relationship and the Ethics Committee: Part Two.David C. Thomasma - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (1):10-26.
    Past ages of medical care are condemned in modern philosophical and medical literature as being too paternalistic. The normal account of good medicine in the past was, indeed, paternalistic in an offensive way to modern persons. Imagine a Jean Paul Sartre going to the doctor and being treated without his consent or even his knowledge of what will transpire during treatment! From Hippocratic times until shortly after World War II, medicine operated in a closed, clubby manner. The knowledge learned in (...)
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  27.  79
    When Physicians Choose to Participate in the Death of Their Patients: Ethics and Physician-Assisted Suicide.David C. Thomasma - 1996 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (3):183-197.
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  28.  24
    Stewardship of the Aged: Meeting the Ethical Challenge of Ageism.David C. Thomasma - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (2):148-159.
    Medical ethics is a footnote to the larger problem of directing our technology to good human ends. Written large, then, medical ethics must ask five basic questions.
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  29.  61
    Bioethics with a Difference: A Comment on McElhinney and Pellegrino.David C. Thomasma - 2001 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (4):287-290.
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  30.  29
    When Physicians Choose to Participate in the Death of Their Patients: Ethics and Physician-Assisted Suicide.David C. Thomasma - 1996 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (3):183-197.
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  31. Autonomy and Clinical Medicine Renewing the Health Professional Relation with the Patient.Jurrit Bergsma & David C. Thomasma - 2000
     
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  32.  68
    Response to Our Commentators.E. D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma - 1981 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):43-51.
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  33.  54
    An Analysis of Arguments for and Against Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: Part One.David C. Thomasma - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (1):62.
    In advanced technological societies there is growing concern about the prospect of protracted deaths marked by incapacitation, intolerable pain and indignity, and invasion by machines and tubing. Life prolongation for critically ill cancer patients in the United States, for example, literally costs a fortune for very little benefit, typically from $82,845 to $189,339 for an additional year of life. Those who return home after major interventions live on average only 3 more months; the others live out their days in a (...)
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  34.  28
    Intercultural Reasoning: The Challenge for International Bioethics.Patricia Marshall, David C. Thomasma & Jurrit Bergsma - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (3):321.
    The exportation of Western biomedicine throughout the world has not resulted in a systematic homogenization of scientific ideology but rather in the proliferation of many forms and practices of biomedicine. Similarly, in the last decade, bioethics has become increasingly an international enterprise. Although there may be consensus regarding the inherent value of ethical discourse as it relates to health and medical care, there are disagreements about the nature and parameters of medical morality. This lack of consensus exists because our beliefs (...)
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  35. Applying General Medical Knowledge to Individuals: A Philosophical Analysis.David C. Thomasma - 1988 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 9 (2):187-200.
    Applying general and statistical knowledge to individuals is difficult either on epidemiological or epistemological grounds. This paper examines these difficulties from the perspective of computer registers of epidemiological data.
     
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  36.  60
    Establishing the Moral Basis of Medicine: Edmund D. Pellegrino's Philosophy of Medicine.David C. Thomasma - 1990 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (3):245-267.
    Pellegrino's philosophy of medicine is explored in categories such as the motivation in constructing a philosophy of medicine, the method, the starting point of the doctor-patient relationship, negotiation about values in this relationship, the goal of the relationship, the moral basis of medicine, and additional concerns in the relationship (concerns such as gatekeeping, philosophical anthropology, axiology, philosophy of the body, and the general disjunction between science and morals). A critique of this philosophy is presented in the following areas: methodology, relation (...)
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  37. Teaching Ethics on Rounds: The Ethicist as Teacher, Consultant, and Decision-Maker.Jacqueline J. Glover, David T. Ozar & David C. Thomasma - 1986 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 7 (1).
    This paper explores the relationship between teaching and consulting in clinical ethics teaching and the role of the ethics teacher in clinical decision-making. Three roles of the clinical ethics teacher are discussed and illustrated with examples from the authors' experience. Two models of the ethics consultant are contrasted, with an argument presented for the ethics consultant as decision facilitator. A concluding section points to some of the challenges of clinical ethics teaching.
     
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  38.  23
    A Model of Community Substituted Consent for Research on the Vulnerable.David C. Thomasma - 2000 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (1):47-57.
    Persons of diminished capacity, especially those who are still legally competent but are de facto incompetent should still be able to participate in moderately risky research projects that benefit the class of persons with similar diseases. It is argued that this view can be supported with a modified communitarianism, a philosophy ofmedicine that holds that health care is a joint responsibility that meets foundational human needs. The mechanism for obtaining a substituted consent I call ``community consent,'' and distinguish this from (...)
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  39.  24
    Setting Floating Limits: Functional Status Care Categories as National Policy.David C. Thomasma - 1990 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 9 (3/4):133-146.
  40. From the Editor in Chief.David C. Thomasma - 1995 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (1).
     
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  41.  50
    Assessing the Arguments for and Against Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: Part Two.David C. Thomasma - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):388-401.
    In Márquez's OfLoveandOtherDemons Abrenuncio the physician and the Marquis discuss the outbreak of rabies that is the centerpiece of the book, since the Marquis' daughter has been bitten by a rabid dog. Abrenuncio notes that the poor.
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  42.  64
    Euthanasia: Toward an Ethical Social Policy.David C. Thomasma - 1990 - Continuum.
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  43.  67
    Medicine as a Science of Action a Response to Peter Hucklenbroich.Edmund D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma - 1987 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (2):235-243.
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  44.  7
    Beneficence in TrustFor the Patient's Good: The Restoration of Beneficence in Health Care.Erich H. Loewy, Edmund D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (1):42.
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  45.  66
    Toward an Axiology for Medicine a Response to Kazem Sadegh-Zadeh.Edmund D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma - 1981 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (3):331-342.
  46.  14
    Beyond Autonomy to the Person Coping With Illness.David C. Thomasma - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (1):12.
    Let us look at autonomy in a new way. Autonomy has a richly deserved place of honor in bioethlcs. It has led the set of principles that formed the basis of the discipline since the beginning. It is the leading principle In what is now regularly called “the Georgetown Mantra,” a phrase suggested by one of the first philosophers ever to be hired In a medical school, K. Danner Clouser. The phrase applies to the principled approach of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, (...)
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  47.  46
    Medical Ethics.David C. Thomasma - 2000 - Philosophical Inquiry 22 (4):7-23.
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  48.  41
    Exploring the Role of Religion in Medical Ethics.David C. Thomasma & Erich H. Loewy - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (2):257.
    From time to time medical ethicists bemoan the loss of a religious perspective in medical ethics. The discipline had its origins in the thinking of explicitly religious thinkers such as Paul Ramsey and Joseph Fletcher. Furthermore, many of those who contributed to the early development of the discipline had training in theology. One thinks of Daniel Callahan, Richard McCormick, Albert Jonsen, Sam. Banks. As the discipline becomes more and more self-reflective, with attention being paid to methodological and conditional concerns, it (...)
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  49.  12
    The Ethical Challenge of Providing Healthcare for the Elderly.David C. Thomasma - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (2):148.
    Populations around the world are aging at a very fast rate, so much so that care for the elderly will soon rupture even the most carefully planned, enlightened care provisions societies can offer. The demographics in advanced countries demonstrate this dilemma, even without projections based on antiaging medications that may be possible in the near future, and a healthier lifestyle that has preoccupied the yuppies for about 10 years.
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  50.  31
    Dubious Premises—Evil Conclusions: Moral Reasoning at the Nuremberg Trials.Edmund D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma - 2000 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (2):261-274.
    Fifty years ago, 23 Nazi physicians were defendants before a military tribunal in Nuremberg, charged with crimes against humanity. During that trial, the world learned of their personal roles in human experimentation with political and military prisoners, mass eugenic sterilizations, state-ordered euthanasia of the and the program of genocide we now know as the Holocaust. These physicians, and their colleagues who did not stand trial, were universally condemned in the free world as ethical pariahs. The term became the paradigm for (...)
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