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  1. David Carr (2003). Making Sense of Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy and Theory of Education and Teaching. Routledgefalmer.
    Making Sense of Education provides a contemporary introduction to the key issues in educational philosophy and theory. Exploring recent developments as well as important ideas from the twentieth century, this book aims to make philosophy of education relevant to everyday practice for teachers and student teachers, as well as those studying education as an academic subject.
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  2. David Carr & J. W. Steutel (eds.) (1999). Virtue Ethics and Moral Education. Routledge.
    This book takes a major step in the philosophy of education by moving back past the Enlightenment and reinstating Aristotelian Virtue at the heart of moral education.
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  3.  31
    David Carr (2013). Varieties of Gratitude. Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (1-2):17-28.
  4.  10
    David Carr (1991). Time, Narrative, and History. Indiana University Press.
    "For description and defense of the narrative configurations of everyday life, and of the practical and social character of those narratives, there is no better treatment than Time, Narrative, and History.... a clear, judicious, and truthful account, provocative from beginning to end." —Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology "... a superior work of philosophy that tells a unique and insightful story about narrative." —Quarterly Journal of Speech.
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  5.  49
    David Carr (2015). Is Gratitude a Moral Virtue? Philosophical Studies 172 (6):1475-1484.
    One matter upon which the already voluminous philosophical and psychological literature on the topic seems to be agreed is that gratitude is a psychologically and socially beneficial human quality of some moral significance. Further to this, gratitude seems to be widely regarded by positive psychologists and virtue ethicists as a moral virtue. This paper, however, sets out to show that such claims and assumptions about the moral character of gratitude are questionable and that its status as a moral virtue is (...)
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  6. David Carr (1999). The Paradox of Subjectivity: The Self in the Transcendental Tradition. Oxford University Press.
    Challenging prevailing interpretations of the development of modern philosophy, this book proposes a reinterpretation of the transcendental tradition, as represented primarily by Kant and Husserl, and counters Heidegger's influential reading of these philosophers. Author David Carr defends their subtle and complex transcendental investigations of the self and the life of subjectivity, and seeks to revive an understanding of what Husserl calls "the paradox of subjectivity"--an appreciation for the rich and sometimes contradictory character of experience.
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  7.  2
    Blaire Morgan, Liz Gulliford & David Carr (2015). Educating Gratitude: Some Conceptual and Moral Misgivings. Journal of Moral Education 44 (1):97-111.
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  8. David Carr (2009). Virtue, Mixed Emotions and Moral Ambivalence. Philosophy 84 (1):31-46.
    Aristotelian virtue ethics invests emotions and feelings with much moral significance. However, the moral and other conflicts that inevitably beset human life often give rise to states of emotional division and ambivalence with problematic implications for any understanding of virtue as complete psychic unity of character and conduct. For one thing, any admission that the virtuous are prey to conflicting passions and desires may seem to threaten the crucial virtue ethical distinction between the virtuous and the continent. One recent attempt (...)
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  9. David Carr (1974). Husserl's Crisis and the Problem of History. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):127-148.
  10.  29
    David Carr (2005). On the Contribution of Literature and the Arts to the Educational Cultivation of Moral Virtue, Feeling and Emotion. Journal of Moral Education 34 (2):137-151.
    This paper sets out to explore connections between a number of plausible claims concerning education in general and moral education in particular: (i) that education is a matter of broad cultural initiation rather than narrow academic or vocational training; (ii) that any education so conceived would have a key concern with the moral dimensions of personal formation; (iii) that emotional growth is an important part of such moral formation; and (iv) that literature and other arts have an important part to (...)
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  11. David Carr (1979). The Logic of Knowing How and Ability. Mind 88 (351):394-409.
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  12.  63
    David Carr (2003). Character and Moral Choice in the Cultivation of Virtue. Philosophy 78 (2):219-232.
    It is central to virtue ethics both that morally sound action follows from virtuous character, and that virtuous character is itself the product of habitual right judgement and choice: that, in short, we choose our moral characters. However, any such view may appear to encounter difficulty in those cases of moral conflict where an agent cannot simultaneously act (say) both honestly and sympathetically, and in which the choices of agents seem to favour the construction of different moral characters. This paper (...)
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  13.  10
    David Carr (2014). The Human and Educational Significance of Honesty as an Epistemic and Moral Virtue. Educational Theory 64 (1):1-14.
    While honesty is clearly a virtue of some educational as well as moral significance, its virtue-ethical status is far from clear. In this essay, following some discussion of latter-day virtue ethics and virtue epistemology, David Carr argues that honesty exhibits key features of both moral and epistemic virtue, and, more precisely, that honesty as a virtue might best be understood as the epistemic component of Aristotelian practical wisdom. In the wake of arguments to be found in Plato's Laws, as well (...)
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  14.  9
    David Carr (2015). The Paradox of Gratitude. British Journal of Educational Studies 63 (4):429-446.
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  15.  2
    Robin Attfield & David Carr (1992). Educating the Virtues: An Essay on the Philosophical Psychology of Moral Development and Education. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (168):379.
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  16.  9
    Ricoeur Paul, Carr David, G. Ballard Edward & E. Embree Lester (1967). Husserl: An Analysis of His Phenomenology. Northwestern University Press.
    Paul Ricoeur was one of the foremost interpreters and translators of Edmund Husserl's philosophy. These nine essays present Ricoeur's interpretation of the most important of Husserl's writings, with emphasis on his philosophy of consciousness rather than his work in logic. In Ricoeur's philosophy, phenomenology and existentialism came of age and these essays provide an introduction to the Husserlian elements which most heavily influenced his own philosophical position.
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  17. David M. Carr (forthcoming). Book Review: The Divine Symphony: The Bible's Many Voices. [REVIEW] Interpretation 58 (3):304-307.
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  18.  31
    David Carr (1996). After Kohlberg: Some Implications of an Ethics of Virtue for the Theory of Moral Education and Development. Studies in Philosophy and Education 15 (4):353-370.
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  19.  35
    David Carr (1974). Phenomenology and the Problem of History: A Study of Husserl's Transcendental Philosophy. Northwestern University Press.
    In Phenomenology and the Problem of History. David Carr examines the paradox involving Husserl's transcendental philosophy and his later historicist theory.
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  20. Bonnie Kent, Jan Steutel, David Carr, John Haldane, Paul Crittenden, Eamonn Callan, Joel J. Kupperman, Ben Spiecker & Kenneth A. Strike (1999). PART 4 107 Weakness and Integrity 8 Moral Growth and the Unity of the Virtues 109. In David Carr & J. W. Steutel (eds.), Virtue Ethics and Moral Education. Routledge.
     
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  21.  31
    David Carr (2003). Rival Conceptions of Practice in Education and Teaching. Journal of Philosophy of Education 37 (2):253–266.
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  22.  27
    David Carr (2006). Moral Education at the Movies: On the Cinematic Treatment of Morally Significant Story and Narrative. Journal of Moral Education 35 (3):319-333.
    Much contemporary social theory has emphasised the key role that cultural and other narrative plays in any human understanding of moral self and agency. However, in those modern social contexts in which literacy has been widespread, such access to narrative has also been largely via the written word: those significantly educated in cultural heritage have been the primarily well?read. Still, in an age in which communication is most commonly prosecuted through the electronic media of radio, cinema, television and computer, it (...)
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  23.  39
    David Carr (2009). Revisiting the Liberal and Vocational Dimensions of University Education. British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (1):1-17.
    The purposes of higher education in general and of university education in particular have long been subject to controversy. Whereas for some, the main role of universities is to provide professional and vocational education and training and their benefits are to be measured in terms of social or economic utility, their value for others is to be seen more in terms of the liberal development and promotion of certain intrinsically worthwhile qualities of mind and intellect. In this context, indeed, much (...)
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  24.  87
    David M. Carr (forthcoming). Book Review: Reading Law: The Rhetorical Shaping of the Pentateuch. [REVIEW] Interpretation 54 (3):318-318.
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  25.  8
    David Carr (2016). From Gratitude to Lamentation: On the Moral and Psychological Economy of Gift, Gain and Loss. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (1):41-59.
    The passing of Nelson Mandela and other figures of contemporary importance may prompt the interesting question of how we might or should understand the psychological, social and moral function of lamentation in human life. This paper aims to show that such responses are not just of emotional and interpersonal significance, but also of serious moral import. To this end, the paper proceeds via exploration of conceptually and morally suggestive correspondences or resonances between the logical grammar of lamentation—which, to be sure, (...)
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  26. David Carr (2008). 1. Narrative Explanation and its Malcontents. History and Theory 47 (1):19–30.
    In this paper I look at narrative as a mode of explanation and at various ways in which the explanatory value of narrative has been criticized. I begin with the roots of narrative explanation in everyday action, experience, and discourse, illustrating it with the help of a simple example. I try to show how narrative explanation is transformed and complicated by circumstances that take us beyond the everyday into such realms as jurisprudence, journalism, and history. I give an account of (...)
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  27.  19
    David Carr (2007). Character in Teaching. British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (4):369-389.
    Qualities of personal character would appear to play a significant role in the professional conduct of teachers. It is often said that we remember teachers as much for the kinds of people they were than for anything they may have taught us, and some kinds of professional expertise may best be understood as qualities of character After (roughly) distinguishing qualities of character from those of personality, the present paper draws on the resources of virtue ethics to try to make sense (...)
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  28.  60
    David Carr (2002). Feelings in Moral Conflict and the Hazards of Emotional Intelligence. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (1):3-21.
    From some perspectives, it seems obvious that emotions and feelings must be both reasonable and morally significant: from others, it may seem as obvious that they cannot be. This paper seeks to advance discussion of ethical implications of the currently contested issue of the relationship of reason to feeling and emotion via reflection upon various examples of affectively charged moral dilemma. This discussion also proceeds by way of critical consideration of recent empirical enquiry into these issues in the literature of (...)
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  29.  21
    David Carr (1999). Where's the Merit If the Best Man Wins? Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 26 (1):1-9.
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  30.  51
    David Carr & Don Skinner (2009). The Cultural Roots of Professional Wisdom: Towards a Broader View of Teacher Expertise. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (2):141-154.
    Perhaps the most pressing issue concerning teacher education and training since the end of the Second World War has been that of the role of theory—or principled reflection—in professional expertise. Here, although the main post-war architects of a new educational professionalism clearly envisaged a key role for theory—considering such disciplines as psychology, sociology and philosophy as indispensable for reflective practice—there are nevertheless well-rehearsed difficulties about crediting such disciplines with quite the (applied) role in educational practice of (say) physiology or anatomy (...)
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  31.  23
    David Carr (2014). Four Perspectives on the Value of Literature for Moral and Character Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education 48 (4):1-16.
    We all know that something is eternal. And it ain’t houses and it ain’t names, and it ain’t earth, and it ain’t even the stars . . . everybody knows in their bones that something is eternal, and that something has to do with human beings. All the greatest people ever lived have been telling us that for five thousand years and yet you’d be surprised how people are always losing hold of it. There’s something way down deep that’s eternal (...)
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  32. David Carr (2004). Moral Values and the Arts in Environmental Education: Towards an Ethics of Aesthetic Appreciation. Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (2):221–239.
  33.  57
    David Carr (1999). Professional Education and Professional Ethics Right to Die or Duty to Live? Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):33–46.
  34.  35
    David Carr (1981). Knowledge in Practice. American Philosophical Quarterly 18 (1):53 - 61.
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  35.  23
    David Carr (1993). Moral Values and the Teacher: Beyond the Paternal and the Permissive. Journal of Philosophy of Education 27 (2):193–207.
  36.  16
    David Carr (ed.) (1998). Education, Knowledge, and Truth: Beyond the Postmodern Impasse. Routledge.
    Seeking to reinstate the importance of knowledge, truth and curriculum in contemporary intellectual debate, this book fills a major gap in the literature and greatly advances an exciting area of research.
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  37.  35
    David Carr (1986). Narrative and the Real World: An Argument for Continuity. History and Theory 25 (2):117-131.
    Narrative and the real world are not mutually exclusive. Life is not a structureless sequence of events; it consists of complex structures of temporal configurations that interlock and receive their meaning from within action itself. It is also not true that life lacks a point of view which transforms events into a story by telling them. Our focus of attention is not the past but the future, because we grasp configurations extending into the future. Action involves the adoption of an (...)
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  38.  21
    David Carr (1992). Education, Learning and Understanding: The Process and the Product. Journal of Philosophy of Education 26 (2):215–225.
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  39.  22
    David Carr & Robert Davis (2007). The Lure of Evil: Exploring Moral Formation on the Dark Side of Literature and the Arts. Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (1):95–112.
  40.  8
    David Carr (forthcoming). Virtue and Character in Higher Education. British Journal of Educational Studies:1-16.
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  41.  16
    David Carr (2007). Religious Education, Religious Literacy and Common Schooling: A Philosophy and History of Skewed Reflection. Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (4):659–673.
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  42.  15
    David Carr (2006). The Moral Roots of Citizenship: Reconciling Principle and Character in Citizenship Education. Journal of Moral Education 35 (4):443-456.
    It seems often to have been thought that we need to make some kind of theoretical and/or practical choice between (liberal) moral, social and political conceptions of social order and citizenship focused on principles (rights and/or duties) and (communitarian or other) perspectives focused on virtue and character. This essay argues that no such tensions arise on a more universalistic virtue ethical conception of moral formation divorced from communitarian or other attachment to politics of local identity. In the course of making (...)
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  43.  10
    David Carr (1994). Knowledge and Truth in Religious Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 28 (2):221–238.
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  44.  4
    David Carr (2002). Moral Education and the Perils of Developmentalism. Journal of Moral Education 31 (1):5-19.
    Many conceptions of moral formation--not least some influential modern accounts--are developmental in character: they aspire to trace progress to moral maturity through or across some sequence or other of more or less well defined stages of cognitive, conative and/or affective growth. In so far as accounts of this kind are often less than mutually consistent, however, the logical status and/or evidential basis of such developmental theories remains less than clear. This article argues that such accounts are inherently normative--precisely, more evaluative (...)
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  45.  29
    David Carr (2007). Towards an Educationally Meaningful Curriculum: Epistemic Holism and Knowledge Integration Revisited. British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (1):3-20.
    Despite the 'progressive' influence of the English Plowden Report and Scottish Primary Memorandum on British primary curricula from the 1960s onwards, secondary education has generally continued to follow a more traditional subject-centred route and post-war educational theorists have not generally been favourably inclined to other than subject-based modes of curriculum planning and organisation. However, in the light of current curriculum reviews on both sides of the Scottish border-callingfor more educationally meaningful curricula-the perennial issue of how school knowledge might best be (...)
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  46.  28
    David Carr (2004). Rereading the History of Subjectivity. Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 8 (2):363-377.
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  47.  72
    David Carr (2010). On the Moral Value of Physical Activity: Body and Soul in Plato's Account of Virtue. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (1):3 – 15.
    It is arguable that some of the most profound and perennial issues and problems of philosophy concerning the nature of human agency, the role of reason and knowledge in such agency and the moral status and place of responsibility in human action and conduct receive their sharpest definition in Plato's specific discussion in the Republic of the human value of physical activities. From this viewpoint alone, Plato's exploration of this issue might be considered a locus classicus in the philosophy of (...)
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  48.  3
    David Carr (1994). Educational Enquiry and Professional Knowledge: Towards a Copernican Revolution. Educational Studies 20 (1):33-52.
    Current conceptions of the nature of education and teaching would appear to be dominated by a generally technicist interpretation of educational enquiry and conduct which has also influenced recent perspectives on professionalism in education. This technicist view, which rests initially on a misreading of the logical character of educational discourse, is further reinforced by certain theories of schooling and pedagogy hailing from the social sciences. It is argued here, however, that since it is the morally normative language of ethical principles (...)
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  49.  65
    David Carr (2010). Dangerous Knowledge: On the Epistemic and Moral Significance of Arts in Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (3):1-15.
    Plato is usually credited as the source of the "ancient quarrel" between reason and rhetoric—and, for him, the arts fall mostly on the less favorable side of rhetoric.1 To be sure, Plato's harsh verdict on the arts rests on an idealist metaphysics and epistemology (or realism about universals)—enshrining a general pessimism about the epistemic prospects of sense experience—which few, nowadays, would consider persuasive. For Plato, since what is presented to us by the senses is no more than an inaccurate copy (...)
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  50.  17
    David Carr (2007). Moralized Psychology or Psychologized Morality? Ethics and Psychology in Recent Theorizing About Moral and Character Education. Educational Theory 57 (4):389-402.
    Moral philosophy seems well placed to claim the key role in theorizing about moral education. Indeed, moral philosophers have from antiquity had much to say about psychological and other processes of moral formation. Given this history, it may seem ironic that much systematic latter‐day theorizing about moral education has been social scientific, and that some of the major trends in the field have been led by empirical or other psychologists. Moreover, while acknowledging the influence of such major past philosophers as (...)
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