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David Chai
Chinese University of Hong Kong
  1. Meontological Generativity: A Daoist Reading of the Thing.David Chai - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (2):303-318.
    This paper relocates the philosophical discourse on the Thing (das Ding) to the world of classical Daoism. In doing so, it explores the bond between the One, the Thing and its signifier before discussing how the Thing unveils itself to the world while receiving the gift of nothingness from Dao. It furthermore contends that the two most prominent discussions of the Thing in the Western tradition--those by Heidegger and Lacan--while philosophically valuable in their own right, fail to provide the degree (...)
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  2.  27
    Daoism and Wu.David Chai - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (10):663-671.
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  3.  70
    Meontology in Early Xuanxue Thought.David Chai - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (1):90-101.
  4.  63
    Nothingness and the Clearing: Heidegger, Daoism and the Quest for Primal Clarity.David Chai - 2014 - Review of Metaphysics 67 (3): 583 - 601.
    Martin Heidegger has made uncovering the truth of being his life’s work. He ultimately came to locate this truth at the site of the clearing (lichtung), which allowed him to sweep away the traditional formulation of the question of being and begin anew with beyng. This second beginning, as Heidegger called it, stood apart from the original in that he saw fit to cloak beyng in nothingness. This paper explores Heidegger’s use of nothingness and his claim that in order to (...)
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  5.  30
    Zhuangzi’s Meontological Notion of Time.David Chai - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):361-377.
    This article investigates the concept of time as it is laid forth in the Daoist text, the Zhuangzi 莊子. Arguing that authentic time lies with cosmogony and not reality as envisioned by humanity, the Zhuangzi casts off the ontology of the present-now in favor of the existentially creative negativity of Dao 道. As the pivot of Dao, nothingness not only allows us to side-step the issue of temporal directionality, it reflects the meontological nature of Daoist cosmology in general. Framing time (...)
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  6.  46
    Musical Naturalism in the Thought of Ji Kang.David Chai - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (2):151-171.
    Wei-Jin period is characterized by neo-Daoism ( xuanxue 玄學), and J I Kang lived in the midst of this philosophical exploration. Adopting the naturalism of the Zhuangzi , J i Kang expressed his socio-political concerns through the medium of music, which was previously regarded as having moral bearing and rectitude. Denying such rectitude became central for J i Kang, who claimed that music was incapable of possessing human emotion, releasing it from the chains of Confucian ritualism. His investigation into the (...)
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  7.  57
    Philosophy and Religion in Early Medieval China. Edited by Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet‐Keung Lo. Interpretation and Literature in Early Medieval China. Edited by Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet‐Keung Lo. [REVIEW]David Chai - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):314-316.
  8.  69
    Liu, Xiaogan, Ed., Dao Companion to Daoist Philosophy: Dordrecht: Springer, 2015, Vii + 569 Pages. [REVIEW]David Chai - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (2):303-306.
  9.  21
    Chinese and Buddhist Philosophy in Early Twentieth-Century German Thought by Eric S. Nelson.David Chai - 2018 - Philosophy East and West 68 (3):1-5.
    Eric Nelson's Chinese and Buddhist Philosophy in Early Twentieth-Century German Thought opens with the following: "The work before you is an interpretive journey through the historical reception of Chinese and Buddhist philosophy in modern German thought, focusing in particular--albeit not exclusively--on the early twentieth century. Its intent is to describe and analyze the intertextual nexus of intersecting sources for the sake of elucidating implications and critical models for intercultural hermeneutics and intercultural philosophy. The possibility of such a philosophy is confronted (...)
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  10.  35
    On Pillowing One’s Skull: Zhuangzi and Heidegger on Death.David Chai - 2016 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 11 (3):483-500.
  11.  7
    Paul Tillich, Zhuangzi, and the Creational Role of Nonbeing.David Chai - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 69 (2):337-356.
    For Paul Tillich, the age-old question "Why is there something and not nothing?"1 is easily answerable: there is something because thought begins with being. However, being alone is insufficient to explain the causal root of reality; the world exists, Tillich says, in a dialectical relationship with nonbeing. This nonbeing is not the absolute Nothing out of which God creates things ex nihilo; on the contrary, it is a relative form of non-being that threatens to eradicate the finite being of things. (...)
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  12.  49
    Wang, Weiwei 王威威, A Study of Hanfeizi’s Thought: Taking Huanglao as the Root 韩非思想研究: 以黄老为本: Nanjing 南京: Nanjing Daxue Chubanshe 南京大学出版社, 2012, Iii + 231 Pages. [REVIEW]David Chai - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (1):137-139.
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  13. Ji Kang on Nourishing Life.David Chai - 2017 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 12 (1):38-53.
    Ji Kang’s “An Essay on Nourishing Life” has, for much of its history, been overshadowed by his more famous work “Sound is without Grief or Joy.” Be that as it may, “An Essay on Nourishing Life” is also an important text in that it delves into the interdependence of the heart-mind, spirit, and vital breath, and into how harmony between them is the key to ensuring physical longevity. In addition to investigating this aspect of his thought, this paper will also (...)
     
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  14.  14
    Rethinking the Daoist Concept of Nature.David Chai - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):259-274.
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  15. T.C. Kline and Justin Tiwald, Eds., Ritual and Religion in the Xunzi. [REVIEW]David Chai - 2016 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 11 (2):320-323.
     
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  16.  19
    Zhuangzi and Musical Apophasis.David Chai - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (3):355-370.
    Whether music is a catalyst for virtuous or licentious behavior, decadent or sparse thoughts, there is no doubting its importance to human civilization; but what of the sounds of Nature? For the Daoist philosopher Zhuangzi 莊子, the sounds of Nature are the epitome of what humanity calls music. Neither contrived nor laden with predispositions, they reflect the unity of things in Dao 道. Focusing on the xianchi 咸池 story in Chapter 14 of the Zhuangzi, this article argues that the true (...)
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  17.  17
    Wandering Beneath Sacred Canopies: Robert C. Neville's Systematic Theology.David Chai - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):267-273.
    Robert Neville’s three-volume set, Philosophical Theology, is a work of considerable physical heft and remarkable intellectual scope, a magnum opus that redefines how we understand religion and its place in the interconnected world of today: “Religion is human engagement of ultimacy expressed in cognitive articulations, existential responses to ultimacy that give ultimate definition to the individual and community, and patterns of life and ritual in the face of ultimacy”. This new definition is necessitated by the fact that “the ultimate reality (...)
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  18.  20
    Zhang, Ji. One and Many: A Comparative Study of Plato's Philosophy and Daoism Represented by Ge Hong. [REVIEW]David Chai - 2014 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (1-2):221-224.
  19. Raphals, Lisa. Divination and Prediction in Early China and Ancient Greece. [REVIEW]David Chai - 2015 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 10 (2):322-326.
  20.  11
    Leah Kalmanson Et Al., Eds. Levinas and Asian Thought. [REVIEW]David Chai - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (2):639-643.
  21. Dao Companion to Neo-Daoism (Xuanxue).David Chai (ed.) - forthcoming - Springer.
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  22.  15
    Daoist Encounters with Phenomenology.David Chai (ed.) - 2020 - Bloomsbury.
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