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David Coady [19]David Anthony Coady [1]
  1. Two Concepts of Epistemic Injustice.David Coady - 2010 - Episteme 7 (2):101-113.
    I describe two concepts of epistemic injustice. The first of these concepts is explained through a critique of Alvin Goldman's veritistic social epistemology. The second is closely based on Miranda Fricker's concept of epistemic injustice. I argue that there is a tension between these two forms of epistemic injustice and tentatively suggest some ways of resolving the tension.
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  2. The Routledge Handbook of Applied Epistemology.David Coady & James Chase (eds.) - 2018 - Routledge.
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  3.  64
    Conspiracy Theories: The Philosophical Debate.David Coady (ed.) - 2007 - Ashgate.
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  4. Conspiracy Theories and Official Stories.David Coady - 2003 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):197-209.
    Conspiracy theories have a bad reputation. This is especially true in the academy and in the media. Within these institutions, to describe someone as a conspiracy theorist is often to imply that his or her views should not be taken seriously. Perhaps this accounts for the fact that philosophers have tended to ignore the topic, despite the enduring appeal of conspiracy theories in popular culture. Recently, however, some philosophers have at least treated conspiracy theorists respectfully enough to try to articulate (...)
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  5. When Experts Disagree.David Coady - 2006 - Episteme 3 (1-2):68-79.
    Alvin Goldman has criticized the idea that, when evaluating the opinions of experts who disagree, a novice should “go by the numbers”. Although Goldman is right that this is often a bad idea, his argument involves an appeal to a principle, which I call the non-independence principle, which is not in general true. Goldman's formal argument for this principle depends on an illegitimate assumption, and the examples he uses to make it seem intuitively plausible are not convincing. The failure of (...)
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  6. An Epistemic Defence of the Blogosphere.David Coady - 2011 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (3):277-294.
    Alvin Goldman claims that the conventional media is in decline as a result of competition from the blogosphere, and that this is a threat to our epistemic wellbeing and, as a result, a threat to good democratic decision-making. He supports this claim with three common complaints about the blogosphere: first, that it is undermining professional journalism, second, that, unlike the conventional media, it lacks ‘balance’, and finally that it is a parasite on the conventional media. I defend the blogosphere against (...)
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  7.  43
    Introduction to Special Issue on Applied Epistemology.David Coady & Miranda Fricker - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (4).
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  8.  10
    Introduction to Special Issue on Applied Epistemology.David Coady & Miranda Fricker - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):153-156.
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  9. Are Conspiracy Theorists Irrational?David Coady - 2007 - Episteme 4 (2):193-204.
    Abstract It is widely believed that to be a conspiracy theorist is to suffer from a form of irrationality. After considering the merits and defects of a variety of accounts of what it is to be a conspiracy theorist, I draw three conclusions. One, on the best definitions of what it is to be a conspiracy theorist, conspiracy theorists do not deserve their reputation for irrationality. Two, there may be occasions on which we should settle for an inferior definition which (...)
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  10.  54
    Rumour Has It.David Coady - 2006 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):41-53.
    Rumours are widely held to be both epistemically and morally suspect. This article concentrates on the epistemic arguments against rumours, since the moral arguments tend to be dependent on them. I conclude that the usual arguments against believing rumours and engaging in rumour-mongering are extremely weak. I compare the epistemic status of rumours to the epistemic status of some rival methods of acquiring information, and conclude that rumours are an important and irreplaceable source of justified belief and knowledge.
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  11.  5
    When Experts Disagree.David Coady - 2006 - Episteme: A Journal of Social Epistemology 3 (1):68-79.
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  12.  95
    Introduction: Conspiracy Theories.David Coady - 2007 - Episteme 4 (2):131-134.
    There has been a lively philosophical debate about the nature of conspiracy theories and their epistemic status going on for some years now. This debate has shed light, not only on conspiracy theories themselves, but also, in the process, on a variety of issues in social epistemology, political philosophy, and the philosophy of religion.
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  13.  6
    A Critical Introduction to Testimony, by Axel Gelfert.David Coady - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (4):837-838.
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  14.  37
    Conspiracy Theories.David Coady - 2007 - Episteme: A Journal of Social Epistemology 4 (2):131-134.
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    Book Notes. [REVIEW]David Coady - 2008 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (3):521 – 524.
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  16. Blackwell Companion to Applied Philosophy.David Coady, Kimberley Brownlee & Kasper Lipper-Rasmussen (eds.) - forthcoming - Blackwell.
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  17. Stanley Milgram and Police Ethics.David Coady - 2001 - Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 3 (2).
     
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  18.  55
    The Climate Change Debate: An Epistemic and Ethical Enquiry.David Coady & Richard Corry - 2013 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Two kinds of philosophical questions are raised by the current public debate about climate change; epistemic questions (Whom should I believe? Is climate science a genuine science?), and ethical questions (Who should bear the burden? Must I sacrifice if others do not?). Although the former have been central to this debate, professional philosophers have dealt almost exclusively with the latter. This book is the first to address both the epistemic and ethical questions raised by the climate change debate and examine (...)
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  19.  35
    What to Believe Now: Applying Epistemology to Contemporary Issues.David Coady - 2012 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    What can we know and what should we believe about today's world? _What to Believe Now: Applying Epistemology to Contemporary Issues_ applies the concerns and techniques of epistemology to a wide variety of contemporary issues. Questions about what we can know-and what we _should_ believe-are first addressed through an explicit consideration of the practicalities of working these issues out at the dawn of the twenty-first century. Coady calls for an 'applied turn' in epistemology, a process he likens to the applied (...)
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