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David Coady [32]David Anthony Coady [1]
  1. What to Believe Now: Applying Epistemology to Contemporary Issues.David Coady - 2012 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    What can we know and what should we believe about today's world? _What to Believe Now: Applying Epistemology to Contemporary Issues_ applies the concerns and techniques of epistemology to a wide variety of contemporary issues. Questions about what we can know-and what we _should_ believe-are first addressed through an explicit consideration of the practicalities of working these issues out at the dawn of the twenty-first century. Coady calls for an 'applied turn' in epistemology, a process he likens to the applied (...)
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  2. Two Concepts of Epistemic Injustice.David Coady - 2010 - Episteme 7 (2):101-113.
    I describe two concepts of epistemic injustice. The first of these concepts is explained through a critique of Alvin Goldman's veritistic social epistemology. The second is closely based on Miranda Fricker's concept of epistemic injustice. I argue that there is a tension between these two forms of epistemic injustice and tentatively suggest some ways of resolving the tension.
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  3. Conspiracy Theories and Official Stories.David Coady - 2003 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):197-209.
    Conspiracy theories have a bad reputation. This is especially true in the academy and in the media. Within these institutions, to describe someone as a conspiracy theorist is often to imply that his or her views should not be taken seriously. Perhaps this accounts for the fact that philosophers have tended to ignore the topic, despite the enduring appeal of conspiracy theories in popular culture. Recently, however, some philosophers have at least treated conspiracy theorists respectfully enough to try to articulate (...)
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  4. Are Conspiracy Theorists Irrational?David Coady - 2007 - Episteme 4 (2):193-204.
    Abstract It is widely believed that to be a conspiracy theorist is to suffer from a form of irrationality. After considering the merits and defects of a variety of accounts of what it is to be a conspiracy theorist, I draw three conclusions. One, on the best definitions of what it is to be a conspiracy theorist, conspiracy theorists do not deserve their reputation for irrationality. Two, there may be occasions on which we should settle for an inferior definition which (...)
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  5. Two Concepts of Epistemic Injustice.David Coady - 2010 - Episteme 7 (2):101-113.
    I describe two concepts of epistemic injustice. The first of these concepts is explained through a critique of Alvin Goldman's veritistic social epistemology. The second is closely based on Miranda Fricker's concept of epistemic injustice. I argue that there is a tension between these two forms of epistemic injustice and tentatively suggest some ways of resolving the tension.
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  6. When experts disagree.David Coady - 2006 - Episteme 3 (1-2):68-79.
    Alvin Goldman has criticized the idea that, when evaluating the opinions of experts who disagree, a novice should “go by the numbers”. Although Goldman is right that this is often a bad idea, his argument involves an appeal to a principle, which I call the non-independence principle, which is not in general true. Goldman's formal argument for this principle depends on an illegitimate assumption, and the examples he uses to make it seem intuitively plausible are not convincing. The failure of (...)
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  7. Conspiracy Theories: The Philosophical Debate.David Coady (ed.) - 2006 - Ashgate.
    Conspiracy theories have a bad reputation. In the past, most philosophers have ignored the topic, vaguely supposing that conspiracy theories are obviously irrational and that they can be easily dismissed. The current philosophical interest in the subject results from a realisation that this is not so. Some philosophers have taken up the challenge of identifying and explaining the flaws of conspiracy theories. Other philosophers have argued that conspiracy theories do not deserve their bad reputation, and that conspiracy theorists do not (...)
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  8. Conspiracy theory as heresy.David Coady - 2023 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 55 (7):756-759.
  9. Conspiracy-baiting and Anti-rumour Campaigns as Propaganda.David Coady - 2018 - In Matthew R. X. Dentith (ed.), Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously. Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 171-187.
    Scholarly treatments of conspiracy theories and of rumours tend to follow a similar pattern. In both cases they usually begin by presupposing that the phenomena in question (conspiracy theories or rumours) should not be believed. They then seek to explain the puzzling fact that many people (though not of course the author or reader) are nonetheless inclined to believe them. I will argue that this is all wrong. Neither rumours nor conspiracy theories deserve their bad reputation. I will also argue (...)
     
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  10.  55
    When Experts Disagree.David Coady - 2006 - Episteme 3 (1-2):68-79.
    Alvin Goldman has criticized the idea that, when evaluating the opinions of experts who disagree, a novice should “go by the numbers”. Although Goldman is right that this is often a bad idea, his argument involves an appeal to a principle, which I call the non-independence principle, which is not in general true. Goldman's formal argument for this principle depends on an illegitimate assumption, and the examples he uses to make it seem intuitively plausible are not convincing. The failure of (...)
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  11. The Climate Change Debate: An Epistemic and Ethical Enquiry.David Coady & Richard Corry - 2013 - New York, NY: Palgrave-Macmillan. Edited by Richard Corry.
    Two kinds of philosophical questions are raised by the current public debate about climate change; epistemic questions (Whom should I believe? Is climate science a genuine science?), and ethical questions (Who should bear the burden? Must I sacrifice if others do not?). Although the former have been central to this debate, professional philosophers have dealt almost exclusively with the latter. This book is the first to address both the epistemic and ethical questions raised by the climate change debate and examine (...)
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  12.  38
    When Experts Disagree.David Coady - 2006 - Episteme: A Journal of Social Epistemology 3 (1):68-79.
  13.  30
    Conspiracy Theories: The Philosophical Debate.David Coady - 2006 - Routledge.
    Conspiracy theories have historically had a bad reputation, with many philosophers dismissing the topic as irrational. Current philosophical debate has challenged this stance, suggesting that these theories do not deserve their bad reputation. This book represents both sides of the debate. Aimed at a broad philosophical community, including epistemologists, political philosophers, and philosophers of history, this book is a significant contribution to the growing interest in conspiracy theories.
  14.  54
    The Routledge Handbook of Applied Epistemology.David Coady & James Chase (eds.) - 2018 - New York: Routledge.
    While applied epistemology has been neglected for much of the twentieth century, it has seen emerging interest in recent years, with key thinkers in the field helping to put it on the philosophical map. Although it is an old tradition, current technological and social developments have dramatically changed both the questions it faces and the methodology required to answer those questions. Recent developments also make it a particularly important and exciting area for research and teaching in the twenty-first century. The (...)
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  15. The Fake News about Fake News.David Coady - 2021 - In Sven Bernecker, Amy K. Flowerree & Thomas Grundmann (eds.), The Epistemology of Fake News. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
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  16. An Epistemic Defence of the Blogosphere.David Coady - 2011 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (3):277-294.
    Alvin Goldman claims that the conventional media is in decline as a result of competition from the blogosphere, and that this is a threat to our epistemic wellbeing and, as a result, a threat to good democratic decision-making. He supports this claim with three common complaints about the blogosphere: first, that it is undermining professional journalism, second, that, unlike the conventional media, it lacks ‘balance’, and finally that it is a parasite on the conventional media. I defend the blogosphere against (...)
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  17. Rumour Has It.David Coady - 2006 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):41-53.
    Rumours are widely held to be both epistemically and morally suspect. This article concentrates on the epistemic arguments against rumours, since the moral arguments tend to be dependent on them. I conclude that the usual arguments against believing rumours and engaging in rumour-mongering are extremely weak. I compare the epistemic status of rumours to the epistemic status of some rival methods of acquiring information, and conclude that rumours are an important and irreplaceable source of justified belief and knowledge.
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  18.  18
    Stop Talking about Echo Chambers and Filter Bubbles.David Coady - 2024 - Educational Theory 74 (1):92-107.
    It is widely believed that we are facing a problem, even a crisis, caused by so-called “echo chambers” and “filter bubbles.” Here, David Coady argues that this belief is mistaken. There is no such problem, and we should refrain from using these neologisms altogether. They serve no useful purpose, since there is nothing we can say with them that we cannot say equally well or better without them. Furthermore, they cause a variety of harms, including, ironically, a tendency to narrow (...)
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  19. Introduction to Special Issue on Applied Epistemology.David Coady & Miranda Fricker - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):153-156.
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  20.  7
    Applied Epistemology.David Coady - 2016 - In Kasper Lippert‐Rasmussen, Kimberley Brownlee & David Coady (eds.), A Companion to Applied Philosophy. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 49–60.
    In this chapter, I argue that it is time for an applied turn in epistemology analogous to the applied turn in ethics of the 1970s. Our epistemic landscape is changing rapidly. For example, the rise of new technologies, such as mobile phones and the internet, along with the decline of older sources of information, such as newspapers and traditional reference books, have significantly changed the ways in which we acquire knowledge and justify our beliefs. Philosophers, and especially epistemologists, should be (...)
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  21.  84
    Conspiracy Theories.David Coady - 2007 - Episteme: A Journal of Social Epistemology 4 (2):131-134.
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  22.  67
    The truth about ‘post-truth’.David Coady - 2019 - Metascience 29 (1):125-128.
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  23.  13
    Is It Virtuous to Love Truth and Hate Falsehood?David Coady - 2023 - Philosophies 8 (5):78.
    There is a great deal of academic literature, much of it coming from the social sciences and from social epistemology, which presents itself as addressing a very general problem: the problem of excessive falsehood. Falsehood comes in two general forms: false statements and false beliefs. Of course, falsehood, in both these forms, has always been with us, but it is often supposed to be on the rise. I will argue that there is no new or growing problem of excessive falsehood (...)
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  24. Introduction: Conspiracy Theories.David Coady - 2007 - Episteme 4 (2):131-134.
    There has been a lively philosophical debate about the nature of conspiracy theories and their epistemic status going on for some years now. This debate has shed light, not only on conspiracy theories themselves, but also, in the process, on a variety of issues in social epistemology, political philosophy, and the philosophy of religion.
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  25.  56
    A Critical Introduction to Testimony, by Axel Gelfert: London: Bloomsbury, 2014, pp. vi + 257, £22.99.David Coady - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (4):837-838.
  26.  10
    Routledge Handbook of Applied Epistemology.David Coady & James Chase (eds.) - 2018 - New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
    While applied epistemology has been neglected for much of the twentieth century, it has seen emerging interest in recent years, with key thinkers in the field helping to put it on the philosophical map. Although it is an old tradition, current technological and social developments have dramatically changed both the questions it faces and the methodology required to answer those questions. Recent developments also make it a particularly important and exciting area for research and teaching in the twenty-first century. The (...)
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  27. Stanley Milgram and Police Ethics.David Coady - 2001 - Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 3 (2).
     
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  28.  4
    Zwei Konzepte epistemischer Ungerechtigkeit.David Coady - 2023 - In Sebastian Schleidgen, Orsolya Friedrich & Andreas Wolkenstein (eds.), Bedeutung und Implikationen epistemischer Ungerechtigkeit. Tectum – ein Verlag in der Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft. pp. 63-82.
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  29.  14
    A Companion to Applied Philosophy.Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen, Kimberley Brownlee & David Coady (eds.) - 2016 - Malden, MA: Wiley.
    Applied philosophy has been a growing area of research for the last 40 years. Until now, however, almost all of this research has been centered around the field of ethics. A Companion to Applied Philosophy breaks new ground, demonstrating that all areasof philosophy, including epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of science, and philosophy of mind, can be applied, and are relevant to questions of everyday life. This perennial topic in philosophy provides an overview of these various applied philosophy developments, highlighting similarities and (...)
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  30.  8
    Bad Beliefs: Why they Happen to Good PeopleLevy, Neil, Bad Beliefs: Why they Happen to Good People, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2022, pp. xxii +188, £22.50 (hardback). [REVIEW]David Coady - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
    Neil Levy’s latest book proposes a general explanation of the fact that many people have ‘bad beliefs’. Levy doesn’t define what he means by ‘bad belief’. In fact, he explicitly refuses to define t...
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  31.  9
    Book notes. [REVIEW]David Coady - 2008 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (3):521 – 524.
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  32.  23
    The truth about ‘post-truth’: Lee McIntyre: Post-Truth. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2018, $12.21. [REVIEW]David Coady - 2020 - Metascience 29 (1):125-128.
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