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David Crossley [30]David J. Crossley [8]
  1. Utilitarianism, Rights and Equality: David J. Crossley.David J. Crossley - 1990 - Utilitas 2 (1):40-54.
    Bentham's dictum, ‘everybody to count for one, nobody for more than one’, is frequently noted but seldom discussed by commentators. Perhaps it is not thought contentious or exciting because interpreted as merely reminding the utilitarian legislator to make certain that each person's interests are included, that no one is missed, in working the felicific calculus. Since no interests are secure against the maximizing directive of the utility principle, which allows them to be overridden or sacrificed, the dictum is not usually (...)
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  2.  23
    Idealism, Metaphysics and Community. [REVIEW]David Crossley - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (3):607-608.
    Idealism offers a distinctive perspective on the methods of philosophical inquiry and on the nature of reality. In the version that dominated Britain at the end of the nineteenth century, there was a strong emphasis on the search for unity, for the connections between and among the diverse aspects of experience, and the many spheres of human interest, such as natural science, psychology, ethics, and politics. While each distinct science or area of study tries to explain and to provide a (...)
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  3.  54
    Senses of Immediacy in Bradley’s Epistemology.David Crossley - 2003 - Bradley Studies 9 (2):58-92.
    F.H. Bradley always said that understanding his views requires understanding the importance of immediate experience, and in a recent paper in Bradley Studies, entitled, “F. H. Bradley and the Doctrine of Immediate Experience,” Dr. Sievers offers an important new study of this topic. His analysis lists eleven characteristics, each of which is, presumably, like the first on the list, an “important characteristic of feeling or immediate experience”. This list, and the title of the paper, suggest that there is a fairly (...)
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  4.  52
    Feeling In Bradley’s Ethical Studies.David Crossley - 1989 - Idealistic Studies 19 (1):43-61.
    Several important discussions of Bradley’s ethical theory have recently appeared, among which is Professor Don MacNiven’s interesting paper on Bradley’s critical analyses of Utilitarian and Kantian ethics. In addition to directing us to central features in, and problems with, Bradley’s understanding of these doctrines, MacNiven correctly emphasizes the role of psychological discussions in Ethical Studies and remarks the distinction Bradley made between the moralist and the moral philosopher. Bradley is trying to understand moral experience, “the world of the thinking, feeling (...)
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  5.  52
    Moore’s Refutation of Idealism: The Debate About Sensations.David Crossley - 1994 - Idealistic Studies 24 (1):1-20.
    G. E. Moore’s The Refutation of Idealism falls into two main parts: the analysis of “esse is percipi,” which Moore claimed was the key premise of all Idealist arguments to the conclusion that reality is spiritual; and the discussion of sensations. I am here only concerned with the latter. This, on its critical side, took a position of Bradley’s as its target and, in its turn, drew objections from Strong and Ducasse. The following explores these disputes about sensory experience which (...)
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  6.  48
    Self-Realization As Perfection In Bradley’s Ethical Studies.David J. Crossley - 1977 - Idealistic Studies 7 (3):199-220.
    Those attempting to expound a comprehensive normative ethical theory are presumably motivated by the belief that there should be an ultimate reason people can give for their actions and a final response to the question of why we should act morally. Historically, one candidate for this ultimate end or reason is self-realization. To convince us of his theory the self-realizationist must successfully explicate the notion of the self—i.e., he must tell us what man’s distinctive nature or function is—and he must (...)
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  7.  61
    Paternalism and Corporate Responsibility.David Crossley - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 21 (4):291 - 302.
    Some writers suggest that corporations should act in ways which reflect a broad concern for the well-being of others, as opposed to a more narrow (Libertarian) conception of responsibility. But this Broad View of moral responsibility puts us on a collision course with our considered intuitions about paternalistic acts. This paper discusses several aspects of this issue: the neutrality of the Standard View of Paternalism, the nature of the defenses of paternalistic interventions allowed by the Standard View of Paternalism and (...)
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  8.  46
    Early Criticisms of Mill’s Qualitative Hedonism.David Crossley - 2000 - Bradley Studies 6 (2):137-175.
    Virtually all the earlier critics — including Sidgwick and the Oxford Idealists — thought J. S. Mill’s arguments for qualities of pleasure and their ranking unacceptable. More recently there has been something of a reversal of this opinion, with commentators such as Skorupski, Donner, Berger and Wilson supporting Mill, and other writers, such as Edwards and Sprigge, arguing that qualitative hedonism is plausible. This paper reconsiders some of the arguments of F.H. Bradley and other earlier critics who dismissed Mill’s quantity-quality (...)
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  9.  32
    Henry Sidgwick: Eye of the Universe-an Intellectual Biography. [REVIEW]David Crossley - 2006 - Dialogue 45 (2):393-395.
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  10.  42
    The Unified Theory of Punishment of Green and Bosanquet.David Crossley - 2004 - Bradley Studies 10 (1/2):1-14.
    One way out to avoid this tension is to adopt what legal theorists call a “mixed theory,” which presents the different penal elements as answering to different concerns. For example, one could hold that the justification of the institution of punishment requires a consequentialist answer focussed on various types of deterrence aimed at promoting social well-being, but that the distribution of actual punishments is decided in terms of desert and the degree of moral culpability of the criminal. This is the (...)
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  11.  35
    Reality and Our Experiences.David Crossley - 1999 - Bradley Studies 5 (1):45-61.
    If Bradley is right that Reality is experience, then an analysis of our experience should help us to understand the general nature of Reality. I believe Bradley thought this was the case. Our experience is of two broad types: feelings or immediate experiences on the one hand, and thoughts and volitions on the other. This division marks the boundary between nonintentional and intentional mental states, and whatever passage is allowed between these two types, they are not the same and no (...)
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  12.  38
    Perfection and the Logic of the Absolute.David Crossley - 2002 - Bradley Studies 8 (1):4-22.
    Moral perfection makes its appearance in Chapter XIV of Appearance and Reality, and presents a problem for the general account of reality Bradley has developed to that point. This paper reexamines that problem and Bradley’s solution. In doing so, it also remarks the importance of Ethical Studies for our understanding of one of the main themes of Appearance and Reality.
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  13.  24
    Bradley's Utilitarian Theory of Punishment.David J. Crossley - 1976 - Ethics 86 (3):200-213.
    Although f h bradley is usually taken to be a retributivist, His writings on the topic of punishment show his position to be more utilitarian. And he criticizes retributivism severely in his article in the "international journal of ethics" in 1894. The present paper attempts to present a more accurate picture of bradley's views of punishment and to show the relevance of these views to contemporary debate on the justification and distribution of punishment.
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  14.  26
    Idealism and Rights: The Social Ontology of Human Rights in the Political Thought of Bernard Bosanquet William Sweet Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1997, Xii + 262 Pp., $39.00. [REVIEW]David Crossley - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (3):688-.
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  15.  33
    A Question About Sensations.David J. Crossley - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (June):355-360.
    Following the formulation of the Identity Theory by Place and Smart a few years ago, there was considerable discussion of subjective mental states and of the importance of first-person reports of mental events. One concern was that the logical status of first-person claims might commit us to belief in irreducible mental phenomena referred to by such propositions. If so the Identity Theory would be false. Kurt Baier went so far as to argue that the incorrigibility of propositions such as “I (...)
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  16.  21
    Spiritualism and Survival: Bradley on AR Wallace.David Crossley - 2005 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 11 (1):7-38.
    People have always had a considerable interest in the possibility of an after-life; some undoubtedly motivated by fear of death and others by a hope for a kind of cosmic corrective justice whereby the deserving sufferers in this life finally get their just rewards and the morally pernicious and evil also get theirs. Clearly, many cultures have believed in an afterlife, for they elaborately prepared the corpses of the dead and saw that useful goods were put in the deceased person's (...)
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  17.  38
    Holism, Individuation, and Internal Relations.David J. Crossley - 1977 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (2):183-194.
  18.  23
    Perspectives on the Logic and Metaphysics of F.H. Bradley.David Crossley - 1996 - Bradley Studies 2 (2):161-164.
    The papers in this collection were originally presented at a conference celebrating the centenary of the publication of Appearance and Reality. Although ranging over a number of topics, they tend to focus on a few central Bradleyan doctrines, thereby giving the volume a reasonable measure of unity. This is helped by the editor’s fine introduction, which demonstrates how each paper contributes to our understanding of Bradley’s solution to the main problem which motivated his metaphysical excursions, that of “the relation between (...)
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  19.  26
    Francis Herbert Bradley's Moral and Political Philosophy.David Crossley - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  20.  16
    Henry Sidgwick: Eye of the Universe—An Intellectual Biography Bart Schultz New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004, Xx + 858 Pp., $45.00. [REVIEW]David Crossley - 2006 - Dialogue 45 (2):393.
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  21.  16
    Fallacies: Classical and Contemporary Readings Hans V. Hansen and Robert C. Pinto University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1995, Xi + 356 Pp., $47.50, $18.95 Paper. [REVIEW]David Crossley - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (2):387-.
  22.  23
    Law and Morality: Readings in Legal Philosophy David Dyzenhaus and Arthur Ripstein, Editors Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996, Xi + 779 Pp., $80.00, $34.95 Paper. [REVIEW]David Crossley - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (4):807-.
  23.  11
    No Title Available: Dialogue.David Crossley - 2006 - Dialogue 45 (2):393-395.
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  24.  12
    The British Idealists on Disjunction.David J. Crossley - 1978 - Idealistic Studies 8 (2):115-123.
    In truth-functional analysis we need not worry about the purported ambiguity of the English ‘or,’ for we can assign different symbols and define each by means of a truth table. However, at least in classes in elementary logic, we often try to indicate that there is some rationale to the assignation of truth values by marshaling English disjunctive sentences which will clearly render an inclusive or an exclusive reading, without the explicit addition of one of the qualifying phrases, “or both” (...)
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  25.  7
    Review of James W. Allard, The Logical Foundations of Bradley's Metaphysics: Judgment, Inference, and Truth[REVIEW]David Crossley - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (3).
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  26.  13
    Art, Expression, and Beauty. By Arthur Berndtson. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. 1969. Pp. Xiv, 305. $8.80.David J. Crossley - 1972 - Dialogue 11 (2):317-319.
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  27.  4
    A Question About Sensations.David J. Crossley - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):355-360.
    Following the formulation of the Identity Theory by Place and Smart a few years ago, there was considerable discussion of subjective mental states and of the importance of first-person reports of mental events. One concern was that the logical status of first-person claims might commit us to belief in irreducible mental phenomena referred to by such propositions. If so the Identity Theory would be false. Kurt Baier went so far as to argue that the incorrigibility of propositions such as “I (...)
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  28.  6
    Property and Justice J. W. Harris Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996, Xxvi + 387 Pp., $135.00. [REVIEW]David Crossley - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (4):911-.
  29. Fallacies: Classical and Contemporary Readings. [REVIEW]David Crossley - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (2):387-388.
    This anthology opens with historical writings on fallacies, including selections from Aristotle, Whately, and J. S. Mill, and then moves on, in Parts 2 and 3, to recent discussions of fallacy theory and analyses of specific fallacies. It ends with a brief section debating the utility and advisability of teaching fallacies in courses in critical thinking or introductory logic. The volume’s target audience is senior undergraduate and graduate students, and also those for whom a compilation of contemporary work on this (...)
     
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  30. Idealism and Rights: The Social Ontology of Human Rights in the Political Thought of Bernard Bosanquet. [REVIEW]David Crossley - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (3):688-690.
    One dominant aspect of British Idealism of the late nineteenth century was its critical reaction to the central traditions of British philosophy from Hobbes to Mill; much of T. H. Green’s thought was cast against his criticism of the Lockean “way of ideas”; F. H. Bradley challenged key doctrines in Mill’s logic and the theory of the association of ideas as developed by Hume, Mill, and Hartley; Bernard Bosanquet’s political philosophy raised objections to the forms of liberal individualism found in (...)
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  31. Law and Morality: Readings in Legal Philosophy. [REVIEW]David Crossley - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (4):807-809.
    This collection of readings in the philosophy of law is divided into two parts. The first is focused on discussions of the nature of law, law’s relations to morality, and how law works as a social institution to protect individual liberty and promote citizens’ opportunities for self-determination and participation in government. The second part selects some contemporary issues so that the reader may see how the more general considerations and concerns of the first part apply to specific problems and concrete (...)
     
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  32. Melvin Richter, The Politics of Conscience: TH Green and His Age Reviewed By.David Crossley - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17 (5):362-364.
  33. Melvin Richter, The Politics of Conscience: T.H. Green and His Age. [REVIEW]David Crossley - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17:362-364.
  34. Property and Justice. [REVIEW]David Crossley - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (4):911-913.
    Property is one of the most important institutions of modern societies. That certain things can be owned, and thereby controlled by individuals or corporations or governments, forms a set of background understandings and expectations against which we plan our projects and make many of our choices. That property institutions are products of social design means we need to become clear about the roles we think they should play and the features they must have. Moreover, that the use-privileges and powers of (...)
     
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  35. Self-Conscious Agency and the Eternal Consciousness: Ultimate Reality in Thomas Hill Green.David Crossley - 1990 - Ultimate Reality and Meaning 13 (1):3-20.
     
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  36. Social Failure and the Doctrine of the Atonement. A Note on Anton K. Jacobs' 'Ideology, Self-Esteem, and Religious Doctrine: Toward a Socio-Psychological Understanding of the Popularity of Evangelicalism in Modern, Capitalist America'.David Crossley - 1990 - Ultimate Reality and Meaning 13 (4):283.
     
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  37. T. H. Green On Property And Moral Responsibility.David Crossley - 2003 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 6.
    In his lectures in the 1870s, T. H. Green argued for an important connection between ethics and politics - namely, that the state has the moral function of promoting and protecting all citizens’ opportunities of developing their moral character. How this works out in a concrete case is best seen by considering Green’s view of how this perspective dictates to society’s design of its property institution. This paper analyzes Green’s theory of property so as to bring out and explore his (...)
     
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  38. The Multiple Contents of Immediacy.David Crossley - 1998 - In Guy Stock (ed.), Appearance Versus Reality: New Essays on Bradley's Metaphysics. Clarendon Press.
     
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