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David Cummiskey [17]David Ross Cummiskey [1]
  1.  10
    Ego‐Less Agency: Dharma‐Responsiveness Without Kantian Autonomy.David Cummiskey - 2020 - Zygon 55 (2):497-518.
    My critical focus in this article is on Rick Repetti's compatibilist conception of free will, and his apparent commitment to a Kantian conception of autonomy, which I argue is in direct conflict with the Buddhist doctrine of no‐self. As an alternative, I defend a conception of ego‐less agency that I believe better coheres with core Buddhist teachings. In the course of the argument, I discuss the competing conceptions of free agency and autonomy defended by Harry Frankfurt, John Martin Fischer, Christine (...)
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  2. Kantian Consequentialism.David Cummiskey - 1990 - Ethics 100 (3):586-615.
    The central problem for normative ethics is the conflict between a consequentialist view--that morality requires promoting the good of all--and a belief that the rights of the individual place significant constraints on what may be done to help others. Standard interpretations see Kant as rejecting all forms of consequentialism, and defending a theory which is fundamentally duty-based and agent-centered. Certain actions, like sacrificing the innocent, are categorically forbidden. In this original and controversial work, Cummiskey argues that there is no defensible (...)
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  3. Kantian Consequentialism.David Cummiskey - 1996 - Oup Usa.
    This book attempts to derive a strong consequentialist moral theory from Kantian foundations. It thus challenges the prevailing view that Kant's moral theory is hostile to consequentialism, and brings together the two main opposing tendencies in modern moral theory.
     
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  4. Korsgaard's Rejection of Consequentialism.David Cummiskey - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (4):360-367.
    Abstract: In her recent book Self-Constitution: Agency, Identity, and Integrity, Christine Korsgaard does a wonderful job developing her Kantian account of normativity and the rational necessity of morality. Korsgaard's account of normativity, however, has received its fair share of attention. In this discussion, the focus is on the resulting moral theory and, in particular, on Korsgaard's reason for rejecting consequentialist moral theories. The article suggests that we assume that Korsgaard's vindication of Kantian rationalism is successful and ask whether, nonetheless, her (...)
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  5. Dignity, Contractualism and Consequentialism.David Cummiskey - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (4):383-408.
    Kantian respect for persons is based on the special status and dignity of humanity. There are, however, at least three distinct kinds of interpretation of the principle of respect for the dignity of persons: the contractualist conception, the substantive conception and the direct conception. Contractualist theories are the most common and familiar interpretation. The contractualist assumes that some form of consent or agreement is the crucial factor that is required by respect for persons. The substantive conceptions of dignity, on the (...)
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  6.  89
    Desert and Entitlement: A Rawlsian Consequentialist Account.David Cummiskey - 1987 - Analysis 47 (1):15 - 19.
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  7.  1
    Gewirth: Critical Essays on Action, Rationality, and Community.Anita Allen, Lawrence C. Becker, Deryck Beyleveld, David Cummiskey, David DeGrazia, David M. Gallagher, Alan Gewirth, Virginia Held, Barbara Koziak, Donald Regan, Jeffrey Reiman, Henry Richardson, Beth J. Singer, Michael Slote, Edward Spence & James P. Sterba - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    As one of the most important ethicists to emerge since the Second World War, Alan Gewirth continues to influence philosophical debates concerning morality. In this ground-breaking book, Gewirth's neo-Kantianism, and the communitarian problems discussed, form a dialogue on the foundation of moral theory. Themes of agent-centered constraints, the formal structure of theories, and the relationship between freedom and duty are examined along with such new perspectives as feminism, the Stoics, and Sartre. Gewirth offers a picture of the philosopher's theory and (...)
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  8.  96
    Consequentialism, Egoism, and the Moral Law.David Cummiskey - 1989 - Philosophical Studies 57 (2):111 - 134.
  9.  4
    Desert and Entitlement: A Rawlsian Consequentialist Account.David Cummiskey - 1986 - Analysis 46 (4):15-19.
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  10.  12
    Health Care Justice: The Social Insurance Approach.David Cummiskey - 2008 - In Michael Boylan (ed.), International Public Health Policy & Ethics. Dordrecht. pp. 157--174.
    There are four basic models for health care systems: the private market insurance model, the national single-payer model, the national health service model, and the social insurance model. The social justice debate over health care usually focuses on the comparative efficiency and quality of competitive private market insurance and the universal coverage and equity of national health care systems. It is a mistake, however, to think that a universal right to health care services requires a single-payer, government-run, national health care (...)
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  11.  33
    Dignity and Vulnerability: Strength and Quality of Character.David Cummiskey - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (1):128.
    George Harris argues that human frailty, indeed vulnerability to utter and complete psychological breakdown in the form “a loss of the will to live, deep clinical depression, insanity, hysteria, debilitating shame, [and] pervasive self-deception,” is a source of our special dignity as persons. This type of fragility is a sign of a higher quality of character, he argues; a quality that is lacking in anyone who has the inner strength to survive the worst of life’s hardships without suffering “a form (...)
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  12.  76
    Joseph Mendola, Goodness and Justice: A Consequentialist Moral Theory (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), Pp. IX + 326.David Cummiskey - 2009 - Utilitas 21 (4):521-525.
  13. WOOD, A.-Kant's Ethical Thought.David Cummiskey - 2001 - Philosophical Books 42 (4):294-296.
     
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  14.  43
    Shelly Kagan, Normative Ethics:Normative Ethics.David Cummiskey - 2000 - Ethics 110 (2):421-426.
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  15.  22
    Reasonable Pluralism, Interculturalism, and Sterba on Question-Beggingness.David Cummiskey - 2014 - The Journal of Ethics 18 (3):265-278.
    In From Rationality to Equality, James Sterba argues that the non-moral, and non-controversial, principle of logic, the principle that good arguments do not beg-the-question, provides a rationally conclusive response to egoism. He calls this “the principle of non-question-beggingness” and it is supposed to justify a conception of “Morality as Compromise.” Sterba’s basic idea is that principles of morality provide a non-question-begging compromise between self-interested reasons and other-regarding reasons. I will focus, first, on Sterba’s rejection of the alternative Kantian rationalist justification (...)
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  16. Confucian Ethics: Responsibilities, Rights, & Relationships.David Cummiskey - 2006 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 16 (1):9-21.
  17. Declaring Death, Giving Life.David Cummiskey - 2005 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 15 (3):70-75.
    After many years of reflection and debate, there is a clear international trend, indeed a near consensus, to endorse as a matter of ethics and law the modern biomedical conception of brain death as an alternative to the traditional conception of death. Alireza Bagheri has surveyed the current state of the law governing organ donation in eight Asian countries. His research shows that for the purpose of facilitating organ donation, the following countries have adopted the biomedical standard of brain death: (...)
     
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