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  1.  83
    Why Early Confucianism Cannot Generate Democracy.David Elstein - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):427-443.
    A central issue in Chinese philosophy today is the relationship between Confucianism and democracy. While some political figures have argued that Confucian values justify non-democratic forms of government, many scholars have argued that Confucianism can provide justification for democracy, though this Confucian democracy will differ substantially from liberal democracy. These scholars believe it is important for Chinese culture to develop its own conception of democracy using Confucian values, drawn mainly from Kongzi (Confucius) and Mengzi (Mencius), as the basis. This essay (...)
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  2. Democracy in Contemporary Confucian Philosophy.David Elstein - 2014 - Routledge.
    This book examines democracy in recent Chinese-language philosophical work. It focuses on Confucian-inspired political thought in the Chinese intellectual world from after the communist revolution in China until today. The volume analyzes six significant contemporary Confucian philosophers in China and Taiwan, describing their political thought and how they connect their thought to Confucian tradition, and critiques their political proposals and views. It illustrates how Confucianism has transformed in modern times, the divergent understandings of Confucianism today, and how contemporary Chinese philosophers (...)
     
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  3.  62
    The Authority of the Master in the Analects.David Elstein - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (2):pp. 142-172.
    This article takes issue with the stereotype of "Confucianism" as authoritarian, a view common in discussions of modern China as well as in scholarship on early China. By studying the roles of master and students and the relationship between them in the Analects , it attempts to show that according to this text the master did not occupy a position of complete dominance over the student. Masters are not generally considered to be like fathers, and students have more room to (...)
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  4.  62
    Han Feizi's Thought and Republicanism.David Elstein - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):167-185.
    Feizi’s philosophy is usually represented as an amoral autocracy where the ruler is the sole political power and runs the state by controlling the people through rewards and punishments. While his system is formally autocratic, this article argues that the purpose behind this system bears some similarity to the republican political ideal of non-domination. In this interpretation, Han Feizi makes the ruler the sole power to mitigate the danger of the state being dominated by ministers. He does not employ republican (...)
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  5.  8
    Beyond the Five Relationships: Teachers and Worthies in Early Chinese Thought.David Elstein - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (3):375-391.
    The Five Relationships are commonly held to be fundamental to Confucian thought and, according to some scholars, constitute the basis of all human relationships. This essay examines how the ruler-minister relationship served as a site over a debate about the political importance of virtue in early Chinese philosophy. Some early texts, including the Confucian texts Mengzi and Xunzi, argue that virtue confers a different status that rulers should recognize by treating the virtuous as equals or even superiors. In particular, these (...)
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  6.  66
    Jiang, Qing 蔣慶, Living Faith and the Kingly Way of Politics 生命信仰與王道政治.David Elstein - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (3):395-398.
  7.  5
    A Confucian Perspective on Lebron and Loyalty.David Elstein - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):67-84.
    This article uses LeBron James's departure from the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2010 to examine the question of athletes’ loyalty to their team and to their region. Athletes often face significant criticism when they leave their original team as it supposedly indicates a lack of loyalty. Given Confucian emphasis on the importance of community, it might be expected that Confucians would endorse this criticism. Instead, I argue that properly understood, James's decision was probably permissible from a Confucian perspective.
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  8.  26
    Mou Zongsan's New Confucian Democracy.David Elstein - 2012 - Contemporary Political Theory 11 (2):192-210.
  9.  28
    China: The Political Philosophy of the Middle Kingdom by Bai Tongdong (Review).David Elstein - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (2):513-515.
    If there is any justice in the world, Bai Tongdong’s recent book China: The Political Philosophy of the Middle Kingdom will find a ready audience among students and nonspecialists interested in classical Chinese political thought and what it has to say about China now and good government in general. Although it is a fine introduction to early Chinese political philosophy, it is more than just that. Bai’s overarching theme is that China in the Spring and Autumn and Warring States period (...)
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  10.  7
    The Future of Confucian Politics in East Asia.David Elstein - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):437-445.
  11.  13
    Gan, Chunsong 幹春松, Back to Wangdao: Confucianism and the World Order 重回王道—儒家與世界秩序. [REVIEW]David Elstein - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (3):399-401.
  12.  10
    Chan, N. Serina, The Thought of M Ou Zongsan.David Elstein - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (4):533-536.
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  13. Xunzi.David Elstein - 2004 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  14.  7
    On Jiang Qing.David Elstein - 2013 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 45 (1):3-8.
    Jiang Qing's proposal of the kingly way is probably the most detailed Chinese alternative to both the current PRC regime and liberal democracy. The nucleus of the kingly way is the idea of threefold legitimacy : a government must have sacred, popular, and historical-cultural legitimacy. For Jiang, this is a universal and invariant political principle, though how it is realized in concrete political institutions varies according to culture. Jiang is critical of democracy for emphasizing only popular legitimacy and neglecting the (...)
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  15. Zhang Zai.David Elstein - 2004 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  16. Book Review. [REVIEW]David Elstein - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10:395-398.
    Jiang, Qing 蔣慶, Living Faith and the Kingly Way of Politics 生命信仰與王道政治 Zhonghe, Taiwan 台灣,中和市: Yangzhengtang wenhua 養正堂文化, 2004, 479 pages.
     
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  17. Confucian Reflective Commitment and Free Expression.David Elstein - 2016 - European Journal of Political Theory:147488511668117.
    As Confucian political thought is adapted to modern circumstances, the question of free expression merits more attention. Most contemporary Confucian political theorists accept a right to political free expression, but this is hard to reconcile with traditional Confucian sources which mainly argue for the need to limit expression in various ways. Through a comparison with John Stuart Mill’s classic account, I make a case that although Confucianism does not accept liberal neutrality, it does appreciate the need for a kind of (...)
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