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  1.  21
    The Winning Ways of a Losing Strategy: Educationalizing Social Problems in the United States.David F. Labaree - 2008 - Educational Theory 58 (4):447-460.
    In this essay, David Labaree examines the paradox of educationalization in the American context. He argues that, like most modern Western societies, the United States has displayed a strong tendency over the years for educationalizing social problems, even though schools have repeatedly proven that they are an ineffective mechanism for solving these problems. He starts by examining the ways in which the process of educationalizing social problems is deeply grounded in American beliefs, social processes, political and organizational tensions, and structural (...)
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  2.  31
    Consuming the Public School.David F. Labaree - 2011 - Educational Theory 61 (4):381-394.
    In this essay David Labaree examines the tension between two competing visions of the purposes of education that have shaped American public schools. From one perspective, we have seen schooling as a way to preserve and promote public aims, such as keeping the faith, shoring up the republic, or promoting economic growth. From the other perspective, we have seen schooling as a way to advance the interests of individual educational consumers in the pursuit of social access and social advantage. In (...)
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  3.  20
    The Lure of Statistics for Educational Researchers.David F. Labaree - 2011 - Educational Theory 61 (6):621-632.
    In this essay David Labaree explores the historical and sociological elements that have made educational researchers dependent on statistics. He shows that educational research as a domain, with its focus on a radically soft and thoroughly applied form of knowledge and with its low academic standing, fits the pattern in which weak professions have been most likely to adopt quantification. One problem with educational researchers' seduction by the quantitative turn is that it deflects attention away from many of the most (...)
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  4.  30
    2013 Dewey Lecture: College—What Is It Good For?David F. Labaree - 2014 - Education and Culture 30 (1):3-15.
    Delivered as the 55th Annual John Dewey Lecture, sponsored by the John Dewey Society, at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association in San Francisco, April 27, 2013. I want to say up front that I’m here under false pretenses. I’m not a Dewey scholar or a philosopher; I’m a sociologist doing history in the field of education. And the title of my lecture is a bit deceptive. I’m not really going to talk about what college is good (...)
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  5.  9
    An Affair to Remember: America's Brief Fling with the University as a Public Good.David F. Labaree - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (1):20-36.
    American higher education rose to fame and fortune during the Cold War, when both student enrollments and funded research shot upward. Prior to World War II, the federal government showed little interest in universities and provided little support. The war spurred a large investment in defence-based scientific research in universities, and the emergence of the Cold War expanded federal investment exponentially. Unlike a hot war, the Cold War offered an extended period of federally funded research public subsidy for expanding student (...)
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