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  1.  21
    Advance Euthanasia Directives: A Controversial Case and its Ethical Implications.David Gibbes Miller, Rebecca Dresser & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):84-89.
    Authorising euthanasia and assisted suicide with advance euthanasia directives is permitted, yet debated, in the Netherlands. We focus on a recent controversial case in which a Dutch woman with Alzheimer’s disease was euthanised based on her AED. A Dutch euthanasia review committee found that the physician performing the euthanasia failed to follow due care requirements for euthanasia and assisted suicide. This case is notable because it is the first case to trigger a criminal investigation since the 2002 Dutch euthanasia law (...)
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  2.  15
    Response To: ‘Dementia and Advance Directives: Some Empirical and Normative Concerns’ by Jongsma Et Al.Scott Y. H. Kim, David Gibbes Miller & Rebecca Dresser - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):95-96.
    We are grateful to Jongsma et al 1 for their interest in our article analysing the case of ‘Mrs A’, a Dutch woman with Alzheimer’s disease who received euthanasia based on her advance euthanasia directive.2 Their commentary criticises two elements of our analysis. First, the authors believe our reasons for doubting that Mrs A had the capacity to write and revise an AED rely on ‘partial’ empirical data and rest on normative errors. Second, they use two of our statements to (...)
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  3.  7
    Beyond Open Communication: A Call for Partnership Between Clinical Ethics and Research Ethics Committees.Christine Grady, David Gibbes Miller & Hae Lin Cho - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (1):52-54.
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  4.  1
    Understanding People’s ‘Unrealistic Optimism’ About Clinical Research Participation.Hae Lin Cho, David Gibbes Miller & Scott Y. H. Kim - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2019-105377.
    BackgroundResearchers worry that patients in early-phase research experience unrealistic optimism about benefits and risks of participation. The standard measure of unrealistic optimism is the Comparative Risk/Benefit Assessment questionnaire, which asks people to estimate their chances of an outcome relative to others in similar situations. Such a comparative framework may not be a natural way for research participants to think about their chances.ObjectiveTo examine how people interpret questions measuring unrealistic optimism and how their interpretations are associated with their responses.MethodsUsing an early-phase (...)
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