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David Glidden [30]David K. Glidden [27]David Kenneth Glidden [1]
  1.  84
    Epicurean prolepsis.David K. Glidden - 1985 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 3:175-217.
  2.  56
    Skeptic Semiotics.David Glidden - 1983 - Phronesis 28 (3):213-255.
    This article presents a detailed exploration of what Sextus and Pyrrhonists regarded as mnemonic signs, where one experience reminds us of another, such as seeing smoke reminds us of a fire that is not yet evident to our present observations. For the skeptic the use of mnemonic signs obviates the need for reasoned, theoretical interpretations or elaborated belief formation. It allows the skeptic or the theory-free physician, for that matter, to live a life or practice symptomatic medicine without the need (...)
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  3. Philosophy and Geography Iii: Philosophies of Place.Philip Brey, Lee Caragata, James Dickinson, David Glidden, Sara Gottlieb, Bruce Hannon, Ian Howard, Jeff Malpas, Katya Mandoki, Jonathan Maskit, Bryan G. Norton, Roger Paden, David Roberts, Holmes Rolston Iii, Izhak Schnell, Jonathon M. Smith, David Wasserman & Mick Womersley (eds.) - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    A growing literature testifies to the persistence of place as an incorrigible aspect of human experience, identity, and morality. Place is a common ground for thought and action, a community of experienced particulars that avoids solipsism and universalism. It draws us into the philosophy of the ordinary, into familiarity as a form of knowledge, into the wisdom of proximity. Each of these essays offers a philosophy of place, and reminds us that such philosophies ultimately decide how we make, use, and (...)
     
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  4.  56
    The Lysis on Loving One's Own.David K. Glidden - 1981 - Classical Quarterly 31 (01):39-59.
    Cicero, Lucullus 38: ‘…non potest animal ullum non adpetere id quod accommodatum ad naturam adpareat …’ From earliest childhood every man wants to possess something. One man collects horses. Another wants gold. Socrates has a passion for companions. He would rather have a good friend than a quail or a rooster. In this way, Socrates begins his interrogation of Menexenus. He then congratulates Menexenus and Lysis for each having what he himself still does not possess. How is it that one (...)
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  5.  22
    Epicurus on Self-Perception.David K. Glidden - 1979 - American Philosophical Quarterly 16 (4):297 - 306.
  6.  58
    Protagorean relativism and physis.David K. Glidden - 1975 - Phronesis 20 (3):209-227.
  7.  20
    The Roots of Political Philosophy: Ten Forgotten Socratic Dialogues.David K. Glidden - 1993 - Noûs 27 (1):99-101.
  8. Moral Vision, "Orthos Logos", and the Role of the "Phronimos".David K. Glidden - 1992 - Apeiron 25 (4):103 - 128.
  9.  20
    The Theaetetus of Plato.David K. Glidden - 1993 - Noûs 27 (3):408-409.
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  10.  20
    The Elusiveness of Moral Recognition and the Imaginary Place of Fiction.David K. Glidden - 1991 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 16 (1):123-141.
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  11. Parrots, pyrrhonists, and native speakers.David K. Glidden - 1994 - In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press.
  12.  8
    The Language Of Love.David Glidden - 1980 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 61 (3):276-290.
    A brief philological look at a key argument in Plato’s “Lysis” reveals Plato’s philosophical interpretation of generic love, or ‘philia’, to be an asymmetrical form of possessive desire, where the interests of the self predominate.
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  13.  16
    Beings and Logos: The Way of Platonic Dialogue.David K. Glidden - 1991 - Noûs 25 (5):738-740.
  14.  25
    Method in Ancient Philosophy (review).David K. Glidden - 2000 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (1):111-113.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Method in Ancient PhilosophyDavid K. GliddenJyl Gentzler, editor. Method in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998. Pp. viii + 398. Cloth, $72.00.The fifteen papers in this collection constitute revisions of conference proceedings and reflect the varied interests of participants. The ensemble exhibits a thoroughly modern methodology. Whatever and however various ancient methods of philosophy may have been, in Anglo-American scholarship it is standard practice to first address established (...)
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  15.  74
    Augustine’s Hermeneutics and the Principle of Charity.David Glidden - 1997 - Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):135-157.
    Augustine advances the view that morally devout interpreters of a Biblical text, such as the Psalter, can each advance contradictory interpretations of the very same portion of the text and yet both interpretations can be true. But the moral character of the interpreter is paramount in weighing the validity of the interpretation. I explore this hermeneutical principle Augustine advances with Donald Davidson’s secular “Principle of Charity”.
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  16.  72
    Aristotelian Perception and the Hellenistic Problem of Representation.David Glidden - 1984 - Ancient Philosophy 4 (2):119-131.
    The understanding of perception advanced by Aristotle and Theophrastus is largely physiological in character, describing the mechanism of perception and its resulting epistemic value. Like Epicurean views, theirs is not a theory of sensory ideas. The Stoics develop a competing approach to perception that describes sensory phenomena in terms of conceptual, linguistic representations.
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  17.  17
    Augustine the Reader: Meditation, Self-Knowledge, and the Ethics of Interpretation.David K. Glidden - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (4):620-621.
  18.  32
    Borderline disorders.David Glidden - 2002 - Philosophy and Geography 5 (1):19 – 27.
    An exploration of the roots of terrorism suggests one primal source arises from so-called “self-made” males who find difficulty forming community attachments. Those who fail to see that they live within the boundaries of humanity fail to recognize where dark ambitions of their souls fester and where inter-subjective reality begins. They suffer from what psychiatrists call borderline disorders. Cut off from a lived community, they become monsters of humanity.
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  19.  16
    Colloquium 11.David K. Glidden - 1990 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 6 (1):413-446.
  20. Common Places.David Glidden - 1995 - Philosophy and Geography 3:169-190.
    An argument for a bottom-up model of social philosophy: Notwithstanding local presumptions and prejudice, common sense is sufficiently aligned with shared experience to be at least locally reliable. It seems as if traversing common ground is requisite for mutual understanding, even if such commonplaces are locally derived. A community of commonplaces is fundamental for communication and can convey an almost miraculous wisdom.
     
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  21.  29
    Friendship in the Classical World (review).David K. Glidden - 1999 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (2):359-361.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Friendship in the Classical World by David KonstanDavid K. GliddenDavid Konstan. Friendship in the Classical World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Pp. xiv + 206. Paper, $18.95.Despite its brevity, Konstan’s history of friendship in classical antiquity speaks volumes. With admirable precision and economy of expression, Konstan cites and surveys scores of ancient authors—poets, playwrights, politicians, novelists and historians, sophists, satirists, philosophers, and theologians—from Homer’s legendary portrait of Achilles (...)
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  22.  51
    From Pyrrhonism to Post-Modernism.David K. Glidden - 1990 - Ancient Philosophy 10 (2):263-267.
  23.  2
    Hellenistic Background for Gassendi's Theory of Ideas.David K. Glidden - 1988 - Journal of the History of Ideas 49 (3):405.
  24.  29
    Josiah Royce's Reading of Plato's "Theaetetus".David K. Glidden - 1996 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (3):273 - 286.
    The eristic paradox served as a starting point for Josiah Royce's metaphysical and moral outlook, beginning with "The Religious Aspect of Philosophy" (1885) and continuing to his final "Hope of the Great Community" (1916). In particular, Royce's early reflections on how error proves possible, as the puzzle was specifically presented in Plato's "Theaetetus", proved foundational for Royce's entire philosophical development. Royce's particular solution to the puzzles of the waxed table and the aviary is suggestive of similar moves in Frege, Wittgenstein, (...)
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  25.  41
    Mimetic Ignorance, Platonic Doxa, and De Re Belief.David Glidden - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (4):355 - 374.
    A close reading of what Plato writes about DOXA, misleadingly translated as ‘belief’, reveals that DOXA exhibits the logical form of what it is now referred to as “de re belief.” A DOXA makes a claim on the nature of reality, not a claim about the speaker’s thoughts about that reality. Consequently a doxastic claim is either true or meaningless when it fails of reference to the portion of reality it is naming. This insight has deep implications for Plato’s epistemology (...)
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  26.  9
    Moral Vision, Orthos Logos, and the Role of the Phronimos.David K. Glidden - 1995 - Apeiron 28 (4):103-128.
  27.  15
    Protagorean Obliquity.David K. Glidden - 1988 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 5 (4):321 - 340.
  28.  12
    Platonic Recognition and the Ontological Connection.David K. Glidden - 1992 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 9 (2):121 - 139.
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  29.  22
    Royce on the Rivalry between Buddhism and Christianity.David K. Glidden - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (3):45-71.
    Within an interpretive community, conversation will not cease until voices are silenced by circumstance.1 Less than three months after lecturing at Lake Forest College in November of 1911, Royce suffered a stroke.2 Within a year, Royce had adequately recovered and recuperated, so as to redouble his preparations for a lecture series on Christianity, initially presented in part at the Lowell Institute and then in a more completed version at Oxford. These lectures would come to constitute The Problem of Christianity.3 Publication (...)
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  30.  12
    Royce’s Reinvention of Meister Eckhart.David K. Glidden - 2017 - The Pluralist 12 (2):104-119.
    Having been set free from sin,You have become slaves of righteousness.Beginning with The Religious Aspect of Philosophy, Josiah Royce's views gradually evolved into a growing celebration of community affiliations. Philosophy of Loyalty eloquently articulated his distinctive social philosophy.1 Royce's vision of ideal community life soon became beatified in The Problem of Christianity in the form of "the Beloved Community," where Royce venerated the Pauline model of a gathered community consisting of those who share a common faith. Heartfelt community loyalty thereby (...)
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  31.  44
    The Skeptic Way: Sextus Empiricus's "Outlines of Pyrrhonism" (review).David K. Glidden - 1998 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (3):460-462.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:The Skeptic Way: Sextus Empiricus’s “Outlines of Pyrrhonism.” by Benson MatesDavid K. GliddenBenson Mates. The Skeptic Way: Sextus Empiricus’s “Outlines of Pyrrhonism.” New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. Pp. x + 335. Cloth, $55.00, Paper, $22.95.Benson Mates’s translation and commentary of Sextus Empiricus’ Outlines of Pyrrhonism appears nearly half a century after Mates first began his pioneering work on Sextus and Hellenistic philosophy. This publication coincides with another (...)
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  32. Book reviews. [REVIEW]David K. Glidden - 1999 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (2):359.
     
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  33. Bernard Williams, Making Sense of Humanity and other philosophical papers 1982-1993. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 1996 - Philosophy in Review 16 (4):231-236.
  34.  19
    Cicero and religion - Cicero on the philosophy of religion. On the nature of the gods and on divination. Pp. XII + 308. Cambridge: Cambridge university press, 2019. Cased, £75, us$99.99. Isbn: 978-1-107-07048-6. [REVIEW]David Glidden & J. P. F. Wynne - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):379-381.
  35.  36
    Descartes and Augustine. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (2):440-451.
  36.  21
    Davie Cicero. On Life and Death. Edited with an Introduction and Notes by Miriam T. Griffin. Pp. xxviii + 251. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Paper, £9.99, US$16.95. ISBN: 978-0-19-964414-8. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (1):290-290.
  37.  8
    Eine Kritische Untersuchung der Erkenntnistheorie Josiah Royces. Mit Kommentaren und Änderungsvorschlägen von Edmund Husserl. Texte aus dem Nachlass von Winthrop Bell by Winthrop P. Bell. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 2019 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 55 (2):197-207.
    This volume contains a German dissertation in philosophy examining Josiah Royce’s theory of knowledge. It was submitted to the Georg-August-Universität of Göttingen in 1914 by Winthrop Bell, a Canadian student of Edmund Husserl’s from 1911 to 1914. This edition includes an appendix consisting of hundreds of concise critical notes Husserl had written on the dissertation typescript that Bell submitted in preparation for his doctoral defense on August 7th of that year, along with several additional remarks Husserl wrote separately to address (...)
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  38.  10
    Epicurus' Scientific Method by Elizabeth Asmis. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 1985 - Isis 76:429-430.
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  39.  38
    I. F. Stone, "The Trial of Socrates". [REVIEW]David K. Glidden - 1990 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (4):601.
  40.  16
    Infinity in the Presocratics. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 1974 - International Philosophical Quarterly 14 (1):133-136.
  41.  3
    Infinity in the Presocratics. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 1974 - International Philosophical Quarterly 14 (1):133-136.
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  42. JEJ Altham and Ross Harrison eds., World, Mind, and Ethics: Essays on the ethical philosophy of Bernard Williams Reviewed by. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 1996 - Philosophy in Review 16 (4):231-236.
     
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  43. Luis E. Navia, Diogenes of Sinope: The Man in the Tub Reviewed by. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 19 (5):363-364.
  44. Luis E. Navia, Diogenes of Sinope: The Man in the Tub. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 19:363-364.
     
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  45.  23
    Roig Lanzillotta, Muñoz Gallarte Plutarch in the Religious and Philosophical Discourse of Late Antiquity. Pp. xvi + 304. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2012. Cased, €107, US$149. ISBN: 978-90-04-23474-1. [REVIEW]David K. Glidden - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):91-93.
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  46. Literatur zum Epikureismus. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 1980 - Philosophische Rundschau 27:224.
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  47.  27
    Marcello Gigante and the Sceptical Epicurean. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 1986 - Ancient Philosophy 6:169-176.
  48.  43
    Plutarch, against colotes - E. kechagia plutarch against colotes. A lesson in history of philosophy. Pp. XXVIII + 359. Oxford: Oxford university press, 2011. Cased, £70, us$135. Isbn: 978-0-19-959723-9. [REVIEW]David K. Glidden - 2013 - The Classical Review 63 (1):81-84.
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  49.  49
    Recollection and Experience: Plato’s Theory of Learning and its Successors. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 1997 - Ancient Philosophy 17 (2):462-469.
  50. Robert B. Louden and Paul Schollmeier, eds., The Greeks and Us: Essays in Honor of Arthur WH Adkins Reviewed by. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17 (5):348-350.
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