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David J. Gunkel [13]David Gunkel [10]David Joseph Gunkel [1]
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David Gunkel
Northern Illinois University
  1.  52
    The Other Question: Can and Should Robots Have Rights?David J. Gunkel - 2018 - Ethics and Information Technology 20 (2):87-99.
    This essay addresses the other side of the robot ethics debate, taking up and investigating the question “Can and should robots have rights?” The examination of this subject proceeds by way of three steps or movements. We begin by looking at and analyzing the form of the question itself. There is an important philosophical difference between the two modal verbs that organize the inquiry—can and should. This difference has considerable history behind it that influences what is asked about and how. (...)
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  2. A Vindication of the Rights of Machines.David J. Gunkel - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (1):113-132.
    This essay responds to the machine question in the affirmative, arguing that artifacts, like robots, AI, and other autonomous systems, can no longer be legitimately excluded from moral consideration. The demonstration of this thesis proceeds in four parts or movements. The first and second parts approach the subject by investigating the two constitutive components of the ethical relationship—moral agency and patiency. In the process, they each demonstrate failure. This occurs not because the machine is somehow unable to achieve what is (...)
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  3. The Machine Question: Critical Perspectives on Ai, Robots, and Ethics.David J. Gunkel - 2012 - MIT Press.
    One of the enduring concerns of moral philosophy is deciding who or what is deserving of ethical consideration. Much recent attention has been devoted to the "animal question" -- consideration of the moral status of nonhuman animals. In this book, David Gunkel takes up the "machine question": whether and to what extent intelligent and autonomous machines of our own making can be considered to have legitimate moral responsibilities and any legitimate claim to moral consideration. The machine question poses a fundamental (...)
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  4.  70
    Mind the Gap: Responsible Robotics and the Problem of Responsibility.David J. Gunkel - 2020 - Ethics and Information Technology 22 (4):307-320.
    The task of this essay is to respond to the question concerning robots and responsibility—to answer for the way that we understand, debate, and decide who or what is able to answer for decisions and actions undertaken by increasingly interactive, autonomous, and sociable mechanisms. The analysis proceeds through three steps or movements. It begins by critically examining the instrumental theory of technology, which determines the way one typically deals with and responds to the question of responsibility when it involves technology. (...)
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  5.  2
    Shifting Perspectives.David J. Gunkel - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (5):2527-2532.
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  6.  87
    Introduction to the Special Issue on Machine Morality: The Machine as Moral Agent and Patient.David J. Gunkel & Joanna Bryson - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (1):5-8.
    One of the enduring concerns of moral philosophy is deciding who or what is deserving of ethical consideration. This special issue of Philosophy and Technology investigates whether and to what extent machines, of various designs and configurations, can or should be considered moral subjects, defined here as either a moral agent, a moral patient, or both. The articles that comprise the issue were competitively selected from papers initially prepared for and presented at a symposium on this subject matter convened during (...)
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  7.  80
    Facing Animals: A Relational, Other-Oriented Approach to Moral Standing.Mark Coeckelbergh & David J. Gunkel - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (5):715-733.
    In this essay we reflect critically on how animal ethics, and in particular thinking about moral standing, is currently configured. Starting from the work of two influential “analytic” thinkers in this field, Peter Singer and Tom Regan, we examine some basic assumptions shared by these positions and demonstrate their conceptual failings—ones that have, despite efforts to the contrary, the general effect of marginalizing and excluding others. Inspired by the so-called “continental” philosophical tradition , we then argue that what is needed (...)
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  8.  15
    Deconstructing the Panic of Pandemic A Critical Review of Slavoj Žižek’s Pandemic! COVID-19 Shakes the World.David Gunkel - 2020 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 14 (2).
    Slavoj Žižek’s new book [...] was written at the beginning of the COVID-19 crisis and quickly rushed into publication in an effort to provide the public with a philosophical engagement with the opportunities and challenges of the novel coronavirus and the social, political, and technological responses that have been marshalled to contend with the panic that has accompanied it.
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  9.  30
    Response to “The Problem of the Question About Animal Ethics” by Michal Piekarski.Mark Coeckelbergh & David J. Gunkel - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (4):717-721.
    In this brief article we reply to Michal Piekarski’s response to our article ‘Facing Animals’ published previously in this journal. In our article we criticized the properties approach to defining the moral standing of animals, and in its place proposed a relational and other-oriented concept that is based on a transcendental and phenomenological perspective, mainly inspired by Heidegger, Levinas, and Derrida. In this reply we question and problematize Piekarski’s interpretation of our essay and critically evaluate “the ethics of commitment” that (...)
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  10.  5
    Special Section: Rethinking Art and Aesthetics in the Age of Creative Machines: Editor’s Introduction.David Gunkel - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (3):263-265.
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  11.  65
    Thinking Otherwise: Ethics, Technology and Other Subjects.David J. Gunkel - 2007 - Ethics and Information Technology 9 (3):165-177.
    Ethics is ordinarily understood as being concerned with questions of responsibility for and in the face of an other. This other is more often than not conceived of as another human being and, as such, necessarily excludes others – most notably animals and machines. This essay examines the ethics of such exclusivity. It is divided into three parts. The first part investigates the exclusive anthropocentrism of traditional forms of moral␣thinking and, following the example of recent innovations in animal rights philosophy, (...)
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  12.  36
    Virtual Alterity and the Reformatting of Ethics.David Gunkel & Debra Hawhee - 2003 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (3-4):173-193.
    This article seeks to reconsider how traditional notions of ethics-ethics that privilege reason, truth, meaning, and a fixed conception of "the human"-are upended by digital technology, cybernetics, and virtual reality. We argue that prevailing ethical systems are incompatible with the way technology refigures the concepts and practices of identity, meaning, truth, and finally, communication. The article examines how both ethics and technology repurpose the liberal humanist subject even as they render such a subject untenable. Such an impasse reformats the question (...)
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  13.  22
    Mark Coeckelbergh: Growing Moral Relations: Critique of Moral Status Ascription: Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2012, 239 Pp, ISBN: 978-1-137-02595-1. [REVIEW]David J. Gunkel - 2013 - Ethics and Information Technology 15 (3):239-241.
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  14.  18
    Virtually Transcendent: Cyberculture and the Body.David J. Gunkel - 1998 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 13 (2):111 – 123.
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  15.  31
    Scary Monsters.David Gunkel - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (2):23-46.
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  16.  11
    Better Living Through Technology.David J. Gunkel - 2017 - Foundations of Science 22 (2):349-352.
    In this brief response to Mark Coeckelbergh’s contribution, I demonstrate how the author introduces an important shift in the way we approach technology. Instead of focusing on the new and often-times dramatic existential vulnerabilities supposedly introduced by technological innovation, Coeckelbergh targets the way technology already transforms our existential vulnerabilities. And I show how this shift in focus has three very important consequences: a different way to ask about and investigate the question concerning technology, the importance of hacking as a mode (...)
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  17.  5
    ¿Por Qué Žižek?... ¿Por Qué Online?David Gunkel - 2007 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 1 (1).
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  18.  5
    The Empire Strikes Back Again: The Cultural-Politics of the Internet.David Gunkel - 1997 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 27 (4):18-21.
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