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  1.  12
    Participating Despite Questions: Toward a More Confident Participatory Technology Assessment. [REVIEW]David H. Guston - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):691-697.
    While the important challenges of public deliberations on emerging technologies are crucial to keep in mind, this paper argues that scholars and practitioners have reason to be more confident in their performance of participatory technology assessments (pTA). Drawing on evidence from the 2008 National Citizens’ Technology Forum (NCTF) conducted by the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University, this paper describes how pTA offers a combination of intensive and extensive qualities that are unique among modes of engagement. In (...)
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  2.  97
    Science, Democracy, and the Right to Research.Mark B. Brown & David H. Guston - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):351-366.
    Debates over the politicization of science have led some to claim that scientists have or should have a “right to research.” This article examines the political meaning and implications of the right to research with respect to different historical conceptions of rights. The more common “liberal” view sees rights as protections against social and political interference. The “republican” view, in contrast, conceives rights as claims to civic membership. Building on the republican view of rights, this article conceives the right to (...)
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  3.  27
    Changing Explanatory Frameworks in the U.S. Government’s Attempt to Define Research Misconduct.David H. Guston - 1999 - Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (2):137-154.
    Nearly two decades of debate have not settled the definition of research misconduct. The literature provides four explanatory frameworks for misconduct. The paper examines these frameworks and maps them onto efforts by the U.S. Public Health Service to define research misconduct and subsequent responses to these efforts by the scientific community. The changing frameworks suggest that closure will not be achieved without an authoritative effort, which may occur through the Research Integrity Panel’s recent attempt to create a government-wide definition.
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  4.  26
    Congressmen and Scientists in the Making of Science Policy: The Allison Commission, 1884–1886. [REVIEW]David H. Guston - 1994 - Minerva 32 (1):25-52.
    The Allison Commission focused attention on the administration of the scientific bureaux and its relation to the jurisdictional system in the Congress. The commission also had a more considerable influence on congressional policy towards the scientific bureaux than was previously thought. Legislative recommendations offered by the Allison Commission became law, even if they avoided the notice of congressional opponents through the strategic manipulation of the appropriations process. Hilary Herbert was not a crude enemy of science, but a staunch defender of (...)
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  5.  68
    The Pumpkin or the Tiger? Michael Polanyi, Frederick Soddy, and Anticipating Emerging Technologies.David H. Guston - 2012 - Minerva 50 (3):363-379.
    Imagine putting together a jigsaw puzzle that works like the board game in the movie “Jumanji”: When you finish, whatever the puzzle portrays becomes real. The children playing “Jumanji” learn to prepare for the reality that emerges from the next throw of the dice. But how would this work for the puzzle of scientific research? How do you prepare for unlocking the secrets of the atom, or assembling from the bottom-up nanotechnologies with unforeseen properties – especially when completion of such (...)
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