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David Hess [14]David J. Hess [12]
  1.  87
    Social Reporting and New Governance Regulation: The Prospects of Achieving Corporate Accountability Through Transparency.David Hess - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (3):453-476.
    This paper argues that social reporting can be an important form of New Governance regulation to achieve stakeholder accountability.Current social reporting practices, however, fall short of achieving stakeholder accountability and actually may work against it. By examining the success and failures of other transparency programs in the United States, we can identify key factors for ensuring the success of social reporting over the long term. These factors include increasing the benefits-to-costs ratios of both the users of the information and the (...)
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  2. The Three Pillars of Corporate Social Reporting as New Governance Regulation: Disclosure, Dialogue, and Development.David Hess - 2008 - Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (4):447-482.
    In this article I examine corporate social reporting as a form of New Governance regulation termed “democratic experimentalism.” Due to the challenges of regulating the behavior of corporations on issues related to sustainable economic development, New Governance regulation—which has a focus on decentralized, participatory, problem-solving-based approaches to regulation—is presented as an option to traditional command-and-control regulation. By examining the role of social reporting under a New Governance approach, I set out three necessary requirements for social reporting to be effective: disclosure, (...)
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  3.  47
    The Three Pillars of Corporate Social Reporting as New Governance Regulation: Disclosure, Dialogue, and Development.David Hess - 2008 - Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (4):447-482.
    In this article I examine corporate social reporting as a form of New Governance regulation termed “democratic experimentalism.” Due to the challenges of regulating the behavior of corporations on issues related to sustainable economic development, New Governance regulation—which has a focus on decentralized, participatory, problem-solving-based approaches to regulation—is presented as an option to traditional command-and-control regulation. By examining the role of social reporting under a New Governance approach, I set out three necessary requirements for social reporting to be effective: disclosure, (...)
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  4.  26
    Social Reporting and New Governance Regulation: The Prospects of Achieving Corporate Accountability Through Transparency.David Hess - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (3):453-476.
    This paper argues that social reporting can be an important form of New Governance regulation to achieve stakeholder accountability.Current social reporting practices, however, fall short of achieving stakeholder accountability and actually may work against it. By examining the success and failures of other transparency programs in the United States, we can identify key factors for ensuring the success of social reporting over the long term. These factors include increasing the benefits-to-costs ratios of both the users of the information and the (...)
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  5.  47
    Science and Neoliberal Globalization: A Political Sociological Approach. [REVIEW]Kelly Moore, Daniel Lee Kleinman, David Hess & Scott Frickel - 2011 - Theory and Society 40 (5):505-532.
  6.  3
    Undone Science: Charting Social Movement and Civil Society Challenges to Research Agenda Setting.David J. Hess, Gwen Ottinger, Joanna Kempner, Jeff Howard, Sahra Gibbon & Scott Frickel - 2010 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 35 (4):444-473.
    ‘‘Undone science’’ refers to areas of research that are left unfunded, incomplete, or generally ignored but that social movements or civil society organizations often identify as worthy of more research. This study mobilizes four recent studies to further elaborate the concept of undone science as it relates to the political construction of research agendas. Using these cases, we develop the argument that undone science is part of a broader politics of knowledge, wherein multiple and competing groups struggle over the construction (...)
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  7.  35
    The Legitimacy of Direct Corporate Humanitarian Investment.David Hess - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (1):95-109.
    Private firms are uniquely positioned to provide significant relief to the misery that pervades the developing world. Global misery has persisted due to a variety of failures in the provision of relief by nation-states and non-governmental organizations, including corruption and the absence of strong background institutions in the countries in need of aid. In many situations, private firms have a comparative advantage over these entities in the provision of aid. Examples such as Merck and the cure for river blindness show (...)
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  8.  31
    Catalyzing Corporate Commitment to Combating Corruption.David Hess - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):781 - 790.
    This article considers what policy reforms may help catalyze corporate commitment to combating corruption. The starting point for this discussion is a voluntary, corporate principles approach to self-regulation. Such an approach should seek to encourage corporations to implement effective compliance and ethics programs and to disclose information related to their anti-corruption activities to relevant stakeholders. Although a corporate principles approach is a private initiative, there is a significant role for the public sector. This article discusses some of the ways that (...)
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  9.  37
    Regulating Corporate Social Performance: A New Look at Social Accounting, Auditing, and Reporting.David Hess - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (2):307-330.
    Traditional approaches to regulating corporate behavior have not, and cannot, produce socially responsible corporations.Although many of the problems with these approaches were identified twenty-five years ago by Christopher Stone, an effective regulatory system still has not been implemented. A model of regulation is needed that is flexible enough to accommodate the variety of contexts in which corporations operate, but also makes corporations responsive to the ever-changing societal expectations of propercorporate behavior. To accomplish these goals, a reflexive law regulatory system is (...)
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  10.  28
    Regulating Corporate Social Performance: A New Look at Social Accounting, Auditing, and Reporting.David Hess - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (2):307-330.
    Traditional approaches to regulating corporate behavior have not, and cannot, produce socially responsible corporations.Although many of the problems with these approaches were identified twenty-five years ago by Christopher Stone, an effective regulatory system still has not been implemented. A model of regulation is needed that is flexible enough to accommodate the variety of contexts in which corporations operate, but also makes corporations responsive to the ever-changing societal expectations of propercorporate behavior. To accomplish these goals, a reflexive law regulatory system is (...)
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  11.  18
    Effects of Global and Local Context on Lexical Processing During Language Comprehension.David J. Hess, Donald J. Foss & Patrick Carroll - 1995 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 124 (1):62.
  12. Science in an Era of Globalization : Alternative Pathways.David J. Hess - 2011 - In Sandra G. Harding (ed.), The Postcolonial Science and Technology Studies Reader. Duke University Press.
     
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  13.  29
    Bourdieu and Science Studies: Toward a Reflexive Sociology. [REVIEW]David J. Hess - 2011 - Minerva 49 (3):333-348.
  14.  29
    Neoliberalism and the History of STS Theory: Toward a Reflexive Sociology.David J. Hess - 2013 - Social Epistemology 27 (2):177 - 193.
    In the sociology of science and sociology of scientific knowledge, the decline of functionalism during the 1970s opened the field to a wide range of theoretical possibilities. However, a Marxist-influenced alternative to functionalism, interests analysis, quickly disappeared, and feminist-multicultural frameworks failed to achieved a dominant position in the field. Instead, functionalism was replaced by a variety of agency-based frameworks that focused on constructive or performative processes. The shift in the sociology of science from Mertonian functionalism to the poststrong program, agency-based (...)
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  15.  61
    Business Ethics and the Natural Environment.David Hess - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):631-631.
  16.  1
    Book Reviews : Computing Myths, Class Realities: An Ethnography of Technology and Working People in Sheffield, England, by David Hakken with Barbara Andrews. Boulder, CO: Westview, 1993, 251 + Xiii Pp. $40.00 (Cloth); $19.95 (Paper. [REVIEW]David J. Hess - 1994 - Science, Technology and Human Values 19 (4):528-530.
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  17.  8
    Ghosts and Domestic Politics in Brazil: Some Parallels Between Spirit Possession and Spirit Infestation.David J. Hess - 1990 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 18 (4):407-438.
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  18.  3
    Ghosts and Domestic Politics in Brazil: Some Parallels Between Spirit Possession and Spirit Infestation.David J. Hess - 1990 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 18 (4):407-438.
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  19.  12
    Pus and PAS: The 'Democracy Question' in Science Studies. [REVIEW]David Hess - 1998 - Metascience 7 (2):313-316.
  20.  11
    Research Handbook on Corporate Crime and Financial Misdealing, Edited by Jennifer Arlen. Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018. 378 Pp. [REVIEW]David Hess - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (1):151-154.
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  21. Technology- and Product-Oriented Movements: Approximating Social Movement Studies and Science and Technology Studies.David J. Hess - 2005 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 30 (4):515-535.
    Technology- and product-oriented movements are mobilizations of civil society organizations that generally include alliances with private-sector firms, for which the target of social change is support for an alternative technology and/or product, as well as the policies with which they are associated. TPMs generally involve “private-sector symbiosis,” that is, a mixture of advocacy organizations/networks and private-sector firms. Case studies of nutritional therapeutics, wind energy, and open-source software are used to explore the tendency for large corporations in established industries to incorporate (...)
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  22. Undone Science: Social Movements, Mobilized Publics, and Industrial Transitions.David Hess - unknown
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