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  1. Locating the Wrongness in Ultra-Violent Video Games.David I. Waddington - 2007 - Ethics and Information Technology 9 (2):121-128.
    The extremely high level of simulated violence in certain recent video games has made some people uneasy. There is a concern that something is wrong with these violent games, but, since the violence is virtual rather than real, it is difficult to specify the nature of the wrongness. Since there is no proven causal connection between video-game violence and real violence, philosophical analysis can be particularly helpful in locating potential sources of wrongness in ultra-violent video games. To this end, this (...)
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  2.  94
    A Field Guide to Heidegger: Understanding 'the Question Concerning Technology'.David I. Waddington - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (4):567–583.
    This essay serves as a guide for scholars, especially those in education, who want to gain a better understanding of Heidegger's essay, ‘The Question Concerning Technology’. The paper has three sections: an interpretive summary, a critical commentary, and some remarks on Heidegger scholarship in education. Since Heidegger's writing style is rather opaque, the interpretive summary serves as a map with which to navigate the essay. The critical commentary offers a careful analysis of some of the central concepts in the essay. (...)
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  3.  10
    Beyond the Search for Truth: Dewey's Humble and Humanistic Vision of Science Education.David I. Waddington & Noah Weeth Feinstein - 2016 - Educational Theory 66 (1-2):111-126.
    In this essay, David Waddington and Noah Weeth Feinstein explore how Dewey's conception of science can help us rethink the way science is done in schools. The authors begin by contrasting a view of science that is implicitly accepted by many scientists and science educators — science as a search for truth — with Dewey's instrumentalist, technological, and nonrealist conception of science. After demonstrating that the search-for-truth conception is closely linked to some ongoing difficulties with science curricula that students find (...)
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  4.  19
    Dewey and Video Games: From Education Through Occupations to Education Through Simulations.David I. Waddington - 2015 - Educational Theory 65 (1):1-20.
    Critics like Leonard Waks argue that video games are, at best, a dubious substitute for the rich classroom experiences that John Dewey wished to create and that, at worst, they are profoundly miseducative. Using the example of Fate of the World, a climate change simulation game, David Waddington addresses these concerns through a careful demonstration of how video games can recapture some of the lost potential of Dewey's original program of education through occupations. Not only do simulation games realize most (...)
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  5.  31
    Interculturalism, Multiculturalism, and the State Funding and Regulation of Conservative Religious Schools.Bruce Maxwell, David I. Waddington, Kevin McDonough, Andrée-Anne Cormier & Marina Schwimmer - 2012 - Educational Theory 62 (4):427-447.
    In this essay, Bruce Maxwell, David Waddington, Kevin McDonough, Andrée-Anne Cormier, and Marina Schwimmer compare two competing approaches to social integration policy, Multiculturalism and Interculturalism, from the perspective of the issue of the state funding and regulation of conservative religious schools. After identifying the key differences between Interculturalism and Multiculturalism, as well as their many similarities, the authors present an explanatory analysis of this intractable policy challenge. Conservative religious schooling, they argue, tests a conceptual tension inherent in Multiculturalism between respect (...)
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  6.  18
    Troublesome Sentiments: The Origins of Dewey’s Antipathy to Children’s Imaginative Activities.David I. Waddington - 2010 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (4):351-364.
    One of the interesting aspects of Dewey’s early educational thought is his apparent hostility toward children’s imaginative pursuits, yet the question of why this antipathy exists remains unanswered. As will become clear, Dewey’s hostility towards imaginative activities stemmed from a broad variety of concerns. In some of his earliest work, Dewey adopted a set of anti-Romantic criticisms and used these concerns to attack what one might call “runaway” imaginative and emotional tendencies. Then, in his early educational writings, these earlier concerns (...)
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  7.  32
    Uncovering Hegelian Connections: A New Look at Dewey's Early Educational Ideas.David I. Waddington - 2010 - Education and Culture 26 (1):pp. 67-81.
    Scholars agree that Hegel had an important influence on John Dewey's early work.1 Unfortunately, the precise nature of this influence is not always easy to discern; in his early works, Dewey mentions Hegel only rarely, and seldom refers to him. However, in his letters and in his later works, Dewey concedes that Hegel had a strong influence on his philosophy. For example, in a 1930 essay, "From Absolutism to Experimentalism," Dewey acknowledges the influence of Hegel, noting that "acquaintance with Hegel (...)
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  8.  33
    Recovering a Forgotten Pioneer of Science Studies: C. E. Ayres' Deweyan Critique of Science and Technology.David I. Waddington - 2013 - Education and Culture 29 (2):159-179.
    In 1926, C. E. Ayres, a young assistant editor of The New Republic, had completed a draft of his first book, Science: The False Messiah. His publishers, Bobbs-Merrill, were enthusiastic but also somewhat worried—the book, which was a blistering critique of the public understanding of science, was engagingly written and eminently readable, but it was also provocative. Bobbs-Merrill were concerned that Ayres’ “very saucy” approach might damage sales, especially given that he was a complete unknown as far as the general (...)
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  9.  29
    Review of Trevor Norris, Consuming Schools: Commercialism and the End of Politics: University of Toronto Press, 2011. [REVIEW]David I. Waddington - 2011 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (1):85-92.
  10.  32
    The Civic Potential of Video Games by Joseph Kahne, Ellen Middaugh and Chris Evans.David I. Waddington - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (4):599-602.
  11.  4
    Introduction to Section II: Dewey's Living Ideas.Terri S. Wilson & David I. Waddington - 2016 - Educational Theory 66 (1-2):89-94.