Results for 'David James Moser'

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  1.  6
    Acquisition, Maintenance, and Retention in the Differential Reinforcement of Vocal Duration.Lane Harlan, Kopp James, Sheppard William, Anderson Thomas & Carlson David - 1967 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 74 (2, Pt.2):1-16.
  2. Fichte's Republic: Idealism, History and Nationalism.David James - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Addresses to the German Nation is one of Fichte's best-known works. It is also his most controversial work because of its nationalist elements. In this book, David James places this text and its nationalism within the context provided by Fichte's philosophical, educational and moral project of creating a community governed by pure practical reason, in which his own foundational philosophical science or Wissenschaftslehre could achieve general recognition. Rather than marking a break in Fichte's philosophy, the Addresses to (...)
     
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  3.  43
    Fichte's Social and Political Philosophy: Property and Virtue.David James - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this study of Fichte's social and political philosophy, David James offers an interpretation of Fichte's most famous writings in this area, including his Foundations of Natural Right and Addresses to the German Nation, centred on two main themes: property and virtue. These themes provide the basis for a discussion of such issues as what it means to guarantee the freedom of all the citizens of a state, the problem of unequal relations of economic dependence between states, and (...)
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  4. Rousseau and German Idealism: Freedom, Dependence and Necessity.David James - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    The claim that Rousseau's writings influenced the development of Kant's critical philosophy, and German idealism, is not a new one. As correct as the claim may be, it does not amount to a systematic account of Rousseau's place within this philosophical tradition. It also suggests a progression whereby Rousseau's achievements are eventually eclipsed by those of Kant, Fichte and Hegel, especially with respect to the idea of freedom. In this book David James shows that Rousseau presents certain challenges (...)
     
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  5. William James on Justice and the Sacredness of Individuality.Rondel David - 2017 - In Susan Dieleman, David Rondel & Christopher Voparil (eds.), Pragmatism and Justice. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 309-323.
  6. Human Knowledge: Classical and Contemporary Approaches.Paul K. Moser & Arnold Vander Nat (eds.) - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    Offering a unique and wide-ranging examination of the theory of knowledge, the new edition of this comprehensive collection deftly blends readings from the foremost classical sources with the work of important contemporary philosophical thinkers. Human Knowledge: Classical and Contemporary Approaches, 3/e, offers philosophical examinations of epistemology from ancient Greek and Roman philosophy (Plato, Aristotle, Sextus Empiricus); medieval philosophy (Augustine, Aquinas); early modern philosophy (Descartes, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, Reid, Kant); classical pragmatism and Anglo-American empiricism (James, Russell, Ayer, Lewis, Carnap, (...)
     
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  7.  21
    ‘Martyr Of Science’: Sir David Brewster, 1781–1868. [REVIEW]Frank James - 1987 - British Journal for the History of Science 20 (1):93-94.
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  8.  62
    William James' Theory of Truth.Paul K. Moser - 1983 - Topoi 2 (2):217-222.
  9.  18
    Ryan D. Tweney and David Gooding , Michael Faraday's ‘Chemical Notes, Hints, Suggestions and Objects of Pursuit’ of 1822, London: Peter Peregrinus in Association with the Science Museum, 1991. Pp. Xvii + 152. ISBN 0-86341-255-6. £29.00. [REVIEW]Frank James - 1993 - British Journal for the History of Science 26 (1):97-97.
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  10.  13
    David Gooding. Experiment and the Making of Meaning: Human Agency in Scientific Observation and Experiment. Dordrecht: Kluwer, 1990. Pp. Xviii + 310. ISBN 0-7923-0719-4. £60.00. [REVIEW]Frank James - 1991 - British Journal for the History of Science 24 (3):386-388.
  11.  8
    David Knight, Humphry Davy: Science and Power. Oxford: Blackwell, 1992. Pp. Xiii + 218. ISBN 0-631-16816-8. £30.00.Frank James - 1994 - British Journal for the History of Science 27 (2):230-231.
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  12.  20
    The Metaphysics of the Social World By David-Hillel Ruben, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1985, X+189 Pp. £14.95. [REVIEW]Susan James - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (237):421-.
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  13.  4
    Daichendt, G. James. Stay Up! Los Angeles Street Art. San Francisco, CA: Cameron + Company, 2012, Numerous Color Illus., $35.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]Shelby Moser - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (4):394-396.
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  14.  1
    David Charles Gooding.Geoffrey Cantor & Frank James - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Science 43 (3):459-467.
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  15. Reviews: James Tully (Ed.), Meaning and Context: Quentin Skinner and His Critics, Cambridge: Polity Press, 1988,? 29.50, Paper E12. 50, XII+ 353 Pp. [REVIEW]Miller David - 1990 - History of the Human Sciences 3 (2):314-316.
  16. RUBEN, DAVID-HILLEL The Metaphysics of the Social World. [REVIEW]Susan James - 1986 - Philosophy 61:421.
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  17.  22
    American Philosophy Before Pragmatism by Russell B. Goodman.V. Denise James - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (4):686-687.
    Goodman’s book is neither a survey, nor a comprehensive history of American philosophy before pragmatism emerged in the late nineteenth century in the works of Charles S. Peirce and William James, nor does it explore undiscovered depths of American thought possibly overlooked or lost to time. Rather, Goodman’s treatment of five men—-Jonathan Edwards, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Henry David Thoreau—attempts to follow James’s understanding of what philosophies are and to “convey each writer’s feel (...)
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  18.  17
    Ectogenesis: A Reply to Singer and Wells.David N. James - 1987 - Bioethics 1 (1):80-99.
    The possibility of achieving ectogenesis, or the growing of a human fetus to term in an artificial womb, is approaching reality as a result of advances in treatment of premature newborns and in in vitro fertilization techniques. In their 1984 book, The Reproductive Revolution, issued in North America as Making Babies, Peter Singer and Deane Wells offered several arguments for ectogenesis. James examines their arguments and rejects two of them, that ectogenesis offers a less problematic alternative to surrogate motherhood, (...)
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  19. The Philosophy of Enchantment. Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology.Robin George Collingwood, David Boucher, Wendy James & Philip Smallwood - 2006 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 68 (3):666-666.
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  20.  16
    Applyng the Concept of Right: Fichte and Babeuf.James David - 2009 - History of Political Thought 30 (4):647-677.
    The article examines the claim made by earlier interpreters of Fichte's political thought, such as Marianne Weber and Xavier Léon, that it contains a number of striking parallels with some of the main ideas associated with the French revolutionary communist Gracchus Babeuf. It is argued that once we understand what it means for Fichte to 'apply' the concept of right (Recht), and how this application relates in particular to his views on property, there appears to be some substance to Weber's (...)
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  21. The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology.David Boucher, Wendy James & Philip Smallwood (eds.) - 2004 - Clarendon Press.
    This is the long-awaited publication of a set of writings by the British philosopher, historian, and archaeologist R.G. Collingwood on critical, anthropological, and cultural themes only hinted at in his previously available work. At the core are six essays on folktale and magic in which Collingwood applies the principles of his philosophy of history to problems in the long-term evolution of human society and culture. The volume opens with three substantial introductory essays by the editors, authorities in their various fields, (...)
     
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  22.  92
    A Pluralistic Universe: Hibbert Lectures at Manchester College on the Present Situation in Philosophy, by William James; A New Philosophical Reading.H. G. Callaway & William James (eds.) - 2008 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    This new edition of William James’s 1909 classic, A Pluralistic Universe reproduces the original text, only modernizing the spelling. The books has been annotated throughout to clarify James’s points of reference and discussion. There is a new, fuller index, a brief chronology of James’s life, and a new bibliography—chiefly based on James’s own references. The editor, H.G. Callaway, has included a new Introduction which elucidates the legacy of Jamesian pluralism to survey some related questions of contemporary (...)
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  23.  34
    The Vision of James.William James - 1996 - Element.
    William James had the courage to experience the collision of European and American ways of thinking head on, and to emerge from it with a new philosophy - one displaying a remarkable vitality for dealing with the transformative issues at the core of the human condition. This easy to read introduction to his life and work explains why James' work is overwhelmingly valuable to us today in getting to grips with the spiritual dimension of human experience.
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  24.  42
    Conceptual Innovation in Fichte's Theory of Property: The Genesis of Leisure as an Object of Distributive Justice.David James - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):509-528.
    Fichte's definitions of property appear to diverge from modern common linguistic usage, especially his identification of leisure as the object of an absolute right of property, and they may even appear arbitrary. I argue that these definitions are not in fact arbitrary. Rather, any divergence from common linguistic usage can be explained in terms of a conceptual innovation which consists in expanding or modifying a concept by thinking it through, thereby generating new content. In the case of Fichte's theory of (...)
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  25.  20
    Rousseau on Needs, Language and Pity: The Limits of 'Public Reason'.David James - 2011 - European Journal of Political Theory 10 (3):372-393.
    The idea of ‘public reason’ has recently been associated with Rousseau’s views on the formation of a general will. Advocates of this idea in the Kantian tradition tend to emphasize reflective acts of rational deliberation which, I suggest, are more suited to written than to spoken language. Rousseau’s accounts of the role of spoken language as a means of expressing human needs and the role of pity in the development of a moral form of reasoning, which allows one properly to (...)
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  26. 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iii).Charlene Haddock Seigfried, Marilyn Fischer, V. Denise James, David Graham Henderson, Robert W. King, Joshua August Skorburg, Saskia Sassen, Sharon M. Meagher, Larry A. Hickman & Eduardo Mendieta - 2013 - The Pluralist 8 (3).
     
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  27.  26
    Fichte's Theory of Property.David James - 2010 - European Journal of Political Theory 9 (2):202-217.
    I discuss J. G. Fichte’s theory of property and its implications in relation to the claim made by C. B. Macpherson that, by broadening the meaning of the term ‘property’, it becomes possible to reconcile two principles of liberal democratic theory that seem to be at odds with each other: the right to property, understood as the right to exclude others from the use or benefit of something, and the right to use and develop one’s capacities. I argue that Fichte’s (...)
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  28.  61
    The Significance of Kierkegaard's Interpretation of Don Giovanni in Relation to Hegel's Philosophy of Art.David James - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):147 – 162.
    (2008). The significance of kierkegaard's interpretation of Don Giovanni in relation to Hegel's philosophy of art1. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 147-162.
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  29.  30
    Suicide and Stoic Ethics in the Doctrine of Virtue.David N. James - 1998 - Kant-Studien 90 (1):40-58.
  30.  13
    Fichte's Reappraisal of Kant's Theory of Cosmopolitan Right.David James - 2010 - History of European Ideas 36 (1):61-70.
    I argue that although in the Foundations of Natural Right Fichte adopts a theory of cosmopolitan right that is in a number of important respects formally identical to the one developed by Kant, he later came in The Closed Commercial State to reassess his earlier Kantian cosmopolitanism. This work can in fact be seen to identify a problem with Kant's cosmopolitanism, namely, Kant's failure to recognize the possibility of an indirect form of coercion based on unequal relations of economic dependence. (...)
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  31.  88
    The 'Self-Positing' Self in Kierkegaard's The Sickness Unto Death.David James - 2011 - The European Legacy 16 (5):587 - 598.
    In response to the claim that Kierkegaard's highly compressed definition of the self, given near the beginning of The Sickness unto Death, should be understood in Hegelian terms, I show that it can be better understood in terms of an earlier development in the history of German idealism, namely, Fichte's theory of self-consciousness. The notion that the self ?posits? itself found in this theory will be used to explain Kierkegaard's definition of the self, including his rejection of the idea that (...)
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  32. William James: The Notion of Consciousness --Communication Made (in French) at the 5th International Congress of Psychology, Rome, 30 April (a New Translation by Jonathan Bricklin). [REVIEW]Jonathan Bricklin & W. James - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (7):55-64.
    I should like to convey to you some doubts which have occurred to me on the subject of the notion of consciousness that prevails in all our treatises on psychology.
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  33.  34
    The Acquisition of Virtue.David N. James - 1986 - The Personalist Forum 2 (2):101-121.
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  34.  18
    On Colorizing Films: A Venture Into Applied Aesthetics.David N. James - 1989 - Metaphilosophy 20 (3-4):332-340.
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  35.  62
    Rousseau on Dependence and the Formation of Political Society.David James - 2013 - European Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):343-366.
    : I explore Rousseau's account of the problem of dependence by means of an analysis of the distinction he makes between dependence on things and dependence on men. With reference to his Second Discourse, I argue that dependence on things alone exists only in the case of primitive man in the earliest stages of the state of nature, while dependence on men is more properly to be understood as dependence on other human beings as mediated by dependence on things. I (...)
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  36.  12
    The Friendship Model:A Reply to Illingworth.David N. James - 1989 - Bioethics 3 (2):142–146.
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  37.  31
    Twenty Questions: Kant's Applied Ethics.David N. James - 1992 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):67-87.
  38.  37
    Fichte on the Vocation of the Scholar and the (Mis)Use of History.David James - 2010 - Review of Metaphysics 63 (3):539-566.
    In his early Some Lectures concerning the Scholar’s Vocation, J. G. Fichte developed an account of the social role of the scholar. This role concerns the task of furthering human culture and progress, which Fichte considers to be a moral duty for the scholar. In these lectures, Fichte also outlined the capabilities and knowledge that the scholar needs in order to be able to fulfill the task in question, including the possession of historical knowledge. The article argues that the later (...)
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  39.  41
    Kant’s Virtue Ethics and the Cultivation of Moral Skills.David N. James - 1991 - Social Philosophy Today 6:29-41.
  40.  33
    Subjective Freedom and Necessity in Hegel's Philosophy of Right.David James - 2012 - Theoria: A Journal of Social and Political Theory 59 (131):41-63.
    Hegel associates 'subjective' freedom with various rights, all of which concern the subject's particularity, and with the demand that this particularity be accorded proper recognition within the modern state. I show that Hegel's account of subjective freedom can be assimilated to the 'positive' model of freedom that is often attributed to him because of the way in which the objective determinations of right recognise the subject's particularity in the form of individual welfare. To this extent, the practical constraints to which (...)
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  41.  44
    Civil Society and Literature: Hegel and Lukács on the Possibility of a Modern Epic.David James - 2011 - The European Legacy 16 (2):205-221.
    It is claimed that Hegel denies the possibility of a modern epic and that his lectures on aesthetics demand the condemnation of all the art of his own time. I use the available student transcripts of his lectures on aesthetics, in conjunction with Lukács's views on the novel, to show that Hegel suggests that the novel might count as a modern epic and that it may perform a significant function in modern ethical life (Sittlichkeit) as presented in his own philosophy (...)
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  42.  19
    From the Age of Heroes to the Prose of Everyday Life: Hegel on the Differences Between the Original and the Modern Epic.David James - 2006 - History of European Ideas 32 (2):190-204.
    I offer an interpretation of Hegel's account of the essential differences between the original epic and the modern epic which supports two claims that have been made on the basis of the available student transcripts of Hegel's lectures on the philosophy of art: Hegel never asserted that art had come to an end in the sense of its having no further significance or interest in the modern world; and Hegel was keen to understand art as a cultural and historical phenomenon, (...)
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  43.  23
    Kant and Hegel on the Right of Rebellion.David James - 2006 - History of Political Thought 27 (2):331-348.
    I compare Kant's position on the issue as to whether there exists a right of rebellion with the position that can be attributed to Hegel on this issue. I argue that while Kant must concede that such a right exists when the state no longer respects what he calls the universal law of right. Hegel offers us grounds for thinking that a right of rebellion may exist even when the state has achieved the form of a Kantian Rechtstaat. I appeal (...)
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  44.  23
    Review: Fichte, Attempt at a Critique of All Revelation. [REVIEW]David James - 2011 - Kantian Review 16 (2):315-317.
  45.  21
    The Closed Commercial State: Perpetual Peace and Commercial Society From Rousseau to Fichte.David James - 2014 - The European Legacy 19 (1):122-124.
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  46.  25
    J.G. Fichte and the Atheism Dispute (1798–1800).David James - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1217-1221.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 0, Issue 0, Page 1-4, Ahead of Print.
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  47.  6
    Sequential Dependencies in Letter Search.Carlton T. James & David E. Smith - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (1):56.
  48.  29
    The Transition From Art to Religion in Hegel’s Theory of Absolute Spirit.David James - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (2):265-286.
    I relate the aesthetic mediation of reason and the identity of religion and mythology found in the Earliest System-Programme of German Idealism to Hegel’s account of the transition from the ancient Greek religion of art to the revealed religion (Christianity) in his theory ofabsolute spirit. While this transition turns on the idea that the revealed religion mediates reason more adequately in virtue of its form (i. e., representational thought), I argue that Hegel’s account of the limitations of religious representational thought, (...)
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  49.  17
    Intracellular Antibody‐Mediated Immunity and the Role of TRIM21.William A. McEwan, Donna L. Mallery, David A. Rhodes, John Trowsdale & Leo C. James - 2011 - Bioessays 33 (11):803-809.
  50.  24
    The Role of Evil in Kant's Liberalism.David James - 2012 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 55 (3):238-261.
    Abstract Carl Schmitt distinguishes between political theories in terms of whether they rest on the anthropological assumption that man is evil by nature or on the anthropological assumption that man is good by nature, and he claims that liberal political theory is based on the latter assumption. Contrary to this claim, I show how Kant's liberalism is shaped by his theory of the radical evil in human nature, and that his liberalism corresponds to the characterization of liberalism that Schmitt himself (...)
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