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  1.  19
    Tortured Ethics.Matthew R. Silliman & David Kenneth Johnson - 2007 - Social Philosophy Today 23:211-222.
    This dialogue discusses a proposal for the legalization of torture under specific circumstances and contrasts it with arguments for a total ban on torture. We consider three types of objection: first, that the difficulty of having adequate knowledge renders the stock “ticking bomb” scenario such a low-probability hypothetical as to present no realistic threat to a policy banning all torture; second, that empirically the information gleaned from torture is so unlikely to be reliable that it could not justify the moral (...)
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  2.  9
    Critical Thinking, Autonomy, and Social Justice.Matthew R. Silliman & David Kenneth Johnson - 2011 - Social Philosophy Today 27:127-138.
    In a fictional conversation designed to appeal to both working teachers and social philosophers, three educators take up the question of whether critical thinking itself can, or should, be taught independently of an explicit consideration of issues related to social justice. One, a thoughtful but somewhat traditional Enlightenment rationalist, sees critical thinking as a neutral set of skills and dispositions, essentially unrelated to the conclusions of morality, problems of social organization, or the content of any particular academic discipline. A second (...)
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  3. Critical Thinking, Autonomy, and Social Justice.Matthew R. Silliman & David Kenneth Johnson - 2011 - Social Philosophy Today 27:127-138.
    In a fictional conversation designed to appeal to both working teachers and social philosophers, three educators take up the question of whether critical thinking itself can, or should, be taught independently of an explicit consideration of issues related to social justice. One, a thoughtful but somewhat traditional Enlightenment rationalist, sees critical thinking as a neutral set of skills and dispositions, essentially unrelated to the conclusions of morality, problems of social organization, or the content of any particular academic discipline. A second (...)
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  4. Tortured Ethics.Matthew R. Silliman & David Kenneth Johnson - 2007 - Social Philosophy Today 23:211-222.
    This dialogue discusses a proposal for the legalization of torture under specific circumstances and contrasts it with arguments for a total ban on torture. We consider three types of objection: first, that the difficulty of having adequate knowledge renders the stock “ticking bomb” scenario such a low-probability hypothetical as to present no realistic threat to a policy banning all torture; second, that empirically the information gleaned from torture is so unlikely to be reliable that it could not justify the moral (...)
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