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David Landy [33]David H. Landy [7]David C. Landy [3]
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David Landy
San Francisco State University
  1.  15
    Fitting Perception in and to Cognition.Robert L. Goldstone, Joshua R. de Leeuw & David H. Landy - 2015 - Cognition 135:24-29.
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  2.  57
    The Education of Perception.Robert L. Goldstone, David H. Landy & Ji Y. Son - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (2):265-284.
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  3.  36
    A Perceptual Account of Symbolic Reasoning.David Landy, Colin Allen & Carlos Zednik - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    People can be taught to manipulate symbols according to formal mathematical and logical rules. Cognitive scientists have traditionally viewed this capacity—the capacity for symbolic reasoning—as grounded in the ability to internally represent numbers, logical relationships, and mathematical rules in an abstract, amodal fashion. We present an alternative view, portraying symbolic reasoning as a special kind of embodied reasoning in which arithmetic and logical formulae, externally represented as notations, serve as targets for powerful perceptual and sensorimotor systems. Although symbolic reasoning often (...)
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  4.  56
    A Defense of Shepherd’s Account of Cause and Effect as Synchronous.David Landy - 2020 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 2 (1):1.
    Lady Mary Shepherd holds that the relation of cause and effect consists of the combination of two objects to create a third object. She also holds that this account implies that causes are synchronous with their effects. There is a single instant in which the objects that are causes combine to create the object which is their effect. Hume argues that cause and effect cannot be synchronous because if they were then the entire chain of successive causes and effects would (...)
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  5.  33
    Kant’s Inferentialism: The Case Against Hume.David Landy - 2015 - Routledge.
    Kant’s Inferentialism draws on a wide range of sources to present a reading of Kant’s theory of mental representation as a direct response to the challenges issued by Hume in A Treatise of Human Nature. Kant rejects the conclusions that Hume draws on the grounds that these are predicated on Hume’s theory of mental representation, which Kant refutes by presenting objections to Hume’s treatment of representations of complex states of affairs and the nature of judgment. In its place, Kant combines (...)
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  6. Hume’s Theory of Mental Representation.David Landy - 2012 - Hume Studies 38 (1):23-54.
    Hume’s arguments in the Treatise require him to employ not only the copy principle, which explains the intrinsic properties of perceptions, but also a thesis that explains the representational content of a perception. I propose that Hume holds the semantic copy principle, which states that a perception represents that of which it is a copy. Hume employs this thesis in a number of his most important arguments, and his doing so enables him to answer an important objection concerning the status (...)
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  7.  26
    Estimating Large Numbers.David Landy, Noah Silbert & Aleah Goldin - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (5):775-799.
    Despite their importance in public discourse, numbers in the range of 1 million to 1 trillion are notoriously difficult to understand. We examine magnitude estimation by adult Americans when placing large numbers on a number line and when qualitatively evaluating descriptions of imaginary geopolitical scenarios. Prior theoretical conceptions predict a log-to-linear shift: People will either place numbers linearly or will place numbers according to a compressive logarithmic or power-shaped function (Barth & Paladino, ; Siegler & Opfer, ). While about half (...)
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  8.  83
    Sellars' Argument for an Ontology of Absolute Processes.David Landy - 2019 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 7 (1):1-25.
    Scholars have rejected Wilfrid Sellars’ argument for an ontology of absolute processes on the grounds that it relies on a dubious and dogmatic appeal to the homogeneity of color. Borrowing from Rosenthal’s recent defense, but ultimate rejection of homogeneity, I defend this claim of on Sellarsian/Kantian transcendental grounds, and reconstruct the remainder of his argument. I argue that Sellars has good reason to suppose that homogeneity is a necessary condition of any possible experience, including indirect experience of theoretical-explanatory posits, and (...)
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  9.  62
    Kant's Better-Than-Terrible Argument in the Anticipations of Perception.David Landy - forthcoming - Kantian Review.
    Scholars working on Kant’s Anticipations of Perception generally attribute to Kant an argument that invalidly infers that objects have degrees of intensive magnitude from the purported fact that sensations do. I argue that this rests on an incorrect disambiguation of Kant’s use of Empfindung (sensation) as referring to the mental states that are our sensings, rather than the objects that are thereby sensed. Kant’s real argument runs as follows. There is a difference between a representation of an empty region of (...)
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  10.  13
    Non-Formal Mechanisms in Mathematical Cognitive Development: The Case of Arithmetic.David W. Braithwaite, Robert L. Goldstone, Han L. J. van der Maas & David H. Landy - 2016 - Cognition 149:40-55.
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  11.  73
    Sellars on Hume and Kant on Representing Complexes.David Landy - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):224-246.
    No Abstract In his graduate-seminar lectures on Kant—published as Kant and Pre-Kantian Themes (Sellars, 2002)—Wilfrid Sellars argues that because Hume cannot distinguish between a vivacious idea and an idea of something vivacious he cannot account for the human ability to represent temporally complex states of affairs. The first section of this paper aims to show that this argument is not properly aimed at the historical Hume who can, on a proper reading, distinguish these kinds of representations. This is not, however, (...)
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  12.  6
    Who Is Buying Bioethics Research?Richard R. Sharp, Angela L. Scott, David C. Landy & Laura A. Kicklighter - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):54-58.
    Growing ties to private industry have prompted many to question the impartiality of academic bioethicists who receive financial support from for-profit corporations in exchange for ethics-related services and research. To the extent that corporate sponsors may view bioethics as little more than a way to strengthen public relations or avoid potential controversy, close ties to industry may pose serious threats to professional independence. New sources of support from private industry may also divert bioethicists from pursuing topics of greater social importance, (...)
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  13.  8
    Character and Causation: Hume's Philosophy of Action by Constantine Sandis.David Landy - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):406-407.
    Constantine Sandis's suggestive new book consists of a series of discrete studies of aspects of Hume's philosophical system that culminate in an argument for the conclusion that "on Hume's view... we are only morally responsible for that subset of actions that have been motivated by our character traits". That final conclusion is the end of a wide-ranging and systematic argument that feels too compressed in the scant one-hundred and twenty-three pages in which it is presented, especially since the philosophical and (...)
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  14.  32
    A Puzzle About Hume's Theory of General Representation.David Landy - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (2):257-282.
    according to hume’s theory of general representation, we represent generalities by associating certain ideas with certain words. On one prominent understanding of this theory, calling things by one name or another does not represent any real qualities of those things or any real relations between them. This interpretation runs into difficulty when we turn our attention to Hume’s own use of such general terms throughout the Treatise. It would seem that Hume’s own distinctions—such as the impression-idea distinction and simple-complex distinction—require (...)
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  15.  57
    Recent Scholarship on Hume's Theory of Mental Representation.David Landy - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):333-347.
    In a recent paper, Karl Schafer argues that Hume's theory of mental representation has two distinct components, unified by their shared feature of having accuracy conditions. As Schafer sees it, simple and complex ideas represent the intrinsic imagistic features of their objects whereas abstract ideas represent the relations or structures in which multiple objects stand. This distinction, however, is untenable for at least two related reasons. Firstly, complex ideas represent the relations or structures in which the impressions that are the (...)
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  16. Hume’s Impression/Idea Distinction.David Landy - 2006 - Hume Studies 32 (1):119-139.
    Understanding the distinction between impressions and ideas that Hume draws in the opening paragraphs of his A Treatise on Human Nature is essential for understanding much of Hume’s philosophy. This, however, is a task that has been the cause of a good deal of controversy in the literature on Hume. I here argue that the significant philosophical and exegetical issues previous treatments of this distinction (such as the force and vivacity reading and the external-world reading) encounter are extremely problematic. I (...)
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  17.  59
    A (Sellarsian) Kantian Critique of Hume's Theory of Concepts.David Landy - 2007 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88 (4):445–457.
    In A Treatise of Human Nature, Hume attempts to explain all human cognition in terms of impressions, ideas, and their qualities, behaviors, and relations. This explanation includes a complicated attempted reduction of beliefs, or judgments, to single ideas. This paper attempts to demonstrate one of the inadequacies of this approach, and any of its kind (any attempted reduction of judgments to their constituent parts, single or multiple) via an argument concerning the logical forms of judgment found implicitly in Kant's Critique (...)
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  18.  43
    Inferentialism and the Transcendental Deduction.David Landy - 2009 - Kantian Review 14 (1):1-30.
    One recent trend in Kant scholarship has been to read Kant as undertaking a project in philosophical semantics, as opposed to, say, epistemology, or transcendental metaphysics. This trend has evolved almost concurrently with a debate in contemporary philosophy of mind about the nature of concepts and their content. Inferentialism is the view that the content of our concepts is essentially inferentially articulated, that is, that the content of a concept consists entirely, or in essential part, in the role that that (...)
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  19.  40
    Scientific Realism Without Rigid Designation in Kant's Analogies.David Landy - 2016 - Kant E-Prints 11 (2):70-89.
    In Kant, Science, and Human Nature, Robert Hanna argues against a version of scientific realism founded on the Kripke/Putnam theory of reference, and defends a Kant-inspired manifest realism in its place. I reject Kriple/Putnam for different reasons than Hanna does, and argue that what should replace it is not manifest realism, but Kant‘s own scientific realism, which rests on a radically different theory of reference. Kant holds that we picture manifest objects by uniting manifolds of sensation using concepts-qua-inferential-rules. When these (...)
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  20.  16
    Categories of Large Numbers in Line Estimation.David Landy, Arthur Charlesworth & Erin Ottmar - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2):326-353.
    How do people stretch their understanding of magnitude from the experiential range to the very large quantities and ranges important in science, geopolitics, and mathematics? This paper empirically evaluates how and whether people make use of numerical categories when estimating relative magnitudes of numbers across many orders of magnitude. We hypothesize that people use scale words—thousand, million, billion—to carve the large number line into categories, stretching linear responses across items within each category. If so, discontinuities in position and response time (...)
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  21.  3
    The Place of Palestinians in Tourist and Zionist Discourses in the ‘City of David’, Occupied East Jerusalem.David Landy - 2017 - Critical Discourse Studies 14 (3):309-323.
    ABSTRACTThe ‘City of David’ in Silwan is on the original site of Jerusalem. Located in Israeli-occupied East Jerusalem, it is both an illegal Israeli settlement in a Palestinian neighbourhood and a popular international tourist destination. This article examines how the site is narrated by tour operators and tourists through fieldwork, interviews and analysis of tourist comments on the TripAdvisor site. It argues that Israeli settlers have successfully harnessed tourist discourse in order to present their vision of a Jewish Jerusalem in (...)
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  22.  40
    Domain-Creating Constraints.Robert L. Goldstone & David Landy - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (7):1357-1377.
    The contributions to this special issue on cognitive development collectively propose ways in which learning involves developing constraints that shape subsequent learning. A learning system must be constrained to learn efficiently, but some of these constraints are themselves learnable. To know how something will behave, a learner must know what kind of thing it is. Although this has led previous researchers to argue for domain-specific constraints that are tied to different kinds/domains, an exciting possibility is that kinds/domains themselves can be (...)
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  23.  15
    Examining the Potential for Exploitation by Local Intermediaries.David Landy & Richard Sharp - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (3):12-13.
  24.  56
    Hegel's Account of Rule-Following.David Landy - 2008 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 51 (2):170 – 193.
    I here discuss Hegel's rule-following considerations as they are found in the first four chapters of his Phenomenology of Spirit. I begin by outlining a number of key premises in Hegel's argument that he adopts fairly straightforwardly from Kant's Transcendental Deduction. The most important of these is that the correctness or incorrectness of one's application of a rule must be recognizable as such to the rule-follower. Supplementing Hegel's text as needed, I then argue that it is possible for an experiencing (...)
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  25. Inside Doubt: On the Non-Identity of the Theory of Mind and Propositional Attitude Psychology. [REVIEW]David Landy - 2005 - Minds and Machines 15 (3-4):399-414.
    Eliminative materialism is a popular view of the mind which holds that propositional attitudes, the typical units of our traditional understanding, are unsupported by modern connectionist psychology and neuroscience, and consequently that propositional attitudes are a poor scientific postulate, and do not exist. Since our traditional folk psychology employs propositional attitudes, the usual argument runs, it too represents a poor theory, and may in the future be replaced by a more successful neurologically grounded theory, resulting in a drastic improvement in (...)
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  26.  80
    Descartes' Compositional Theory of Mental Representation.David Landy - 2011 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (2):214-231.
    In his, ‘Descartes' Ontology of Thought’, Alan Nelson presents, on Descartes' behalf, a compositional theory of mental representation according to which the content of any mental representation is either simple or is entirely constituted by a combination of innate simples. Here the simples are our ideas of God, thought, extension, and union. My objection will be that it is simply ludicrous to think that any four simples are adequate to the task of combining to constitute all of human thought, and (...)
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  27.  35
    Qualities and Simple Ideas: Hume and His Debt to Berkeley.Alan Nelson & David Landy - 2011 - In Lawrence Nolan (ed.), Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 216-238.
  28.  71
    Why Spatial-Numeric Associations Aren't Evidence for a Mental Number Line.David H. Landy, Erin L. Jones & John E. Hummel - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 357--362.
  29. Sellars and Hume on the Ontological Status of Theoretical-Explanatory Entities.David Landy - 2018 - In Luca Cortini, Luca Corti & Antonio Nunziante (eds.), Sellars and the History of Modern Philosophy. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 59-78.
    Though Sellars often criticizes Hume, Hume's treatment of theoretical entities turns out to have more in common with Sellars' view of them than with the view of the logical positivists who claimed Hume as their predecessor.
     
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  30.  67
    What Incongruent Counterparts Show.David Landy - 2013 - European Journal of Philosophy 21 (4):507-524.
    In a recent paper, Robert Hanna argues that Kant's incongruent counterparts example can be mobilized to show that some mental representations, which represent complex states of affairs as complex, do so entirely non-conceptually. I will argue that Hanna is right to see that Kant uses incongruent counterparts to show that there must be a non-conceptual component to cognition, but goes too far in concluding that there must be entirely non-conceptual representations that represent objects as existing in space and time. Kant (...)
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  31.  20
    Is Hume an Inductivist?David Landy - 2015 - Hume Studies 41 (2):231-261.
    Across a series of papers and again in her recent book, Graciela De Pierris has argued that Hume is what she calls an inductivist about the methods of science. De Pierris takes Hume to follow Newton in holding that the ultimate aim of science is to seek "assurance concerning objects, which are removed from the present testimony of our memory and senses",1 and its method therefore to consist in the subsumption of observable particulars under inductively-established universal generalizations. As De Pierris (...)
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  32.  36
    Review: Sedgwick, Hegel's Critique of Kant: From Dichotomy to Identity. [REVIEW]David Landy - 2013 - Kantian Review 18 (1):157-162.
  33.  30
    Conceptual Discontinuity Involves Recycling Old Processes in New Domains.David Landy, Colin Allen & Michael L. Anderson - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):136-137.
  34.  20
    The Role of Explanation in Very Simple Tasks.Eric G. Taylor, David H. Landy & Brian H. Ross - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
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  35.  4
    Carving Nature at its Joints or Cutting its Effective Loops? On the Dangers of Trying to Disentangle Intertwined Mental Processes.Robert L. Goldstone, Joshua R. de Leeuw & David H. Landy - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  36.  13
    Robert Hanna, Cognition, Content, and the A Priori: A Study in the Philosophy of Mind and Knowledge Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015 Pp. 464 ISBN 9780198716297 $99.00. [REVIEW]David Landy - 2016 - Kantian Review 21 (2):333-339.
  37.  10
    Sally Sedgwick, Hegel's Critique Of Kant: From Dichotomy To Identity Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012 Pp. 240 Isbn 9780199698363 , Us $65.00. [REVIEW]David Landy - 2013 - Kantian Review 18 (1):157-162.
    Book Reviews David Landy, Kantian Review, FirstView Article.
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  38.  24
    Clinical Ethics and Patient Satisfaction: The Practical Significance of Distinguishing Ethics and Morals.David C. Landy, Kenneth W. Goodman & Jeffrey P. Brosco - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (5):20-22.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 5, Page 20-22, May 2012.
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  39.  4
    Corrigendum to ‘‘Non-Formal Mechanisms in Mathematical Cognitive Development: The Case of Arithmetic’’ [Cognition 149 40–55]. [REVIEW]David W. Braithwaite, Robert L. Goldstone, Han L. J. van der Maas & David H. Landy - 2016 - Cognition 151:113.
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  40. Arithmetic Notation… Now in 3D!David Landy & Sally Linkenauger - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
     
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  41.  12
    Conflicts of Interest in Bioethics: A Response to Our Critics.David C. Landy & Richard R. Sharp - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):1-2.
    Growing ties to private industry have prompted many to question the impartiality of academic bioethicists who receive financial support from for-profit corporations in exchange for ethics-related services and research. To the extent that corporate sponsors may view bioethics as little more than a way to strengthen public relations or avoid potential controversy, close ties to industry may pose serious threats to professional independence. New sources of support from private industry may also divert bioethicists from pursuing topics of greater social importance, (...)
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  42. A Rebuttal to a Classic Objection to Kant's Argument in the First Analogy.David Landy - 2014 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 31 (4):331-345.
     
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  43.  12
    Hume's Science of Human Nature: Scientific Realism, Reason, and Substantial Explanation.David Landy - 2017 - New York, USA: Routledge.
    Hume’s Science of Human Nature is an investigation of the philosophical commitments underlying Hume's methodology in pursuing what he calls ‘the science of human nature’. It argues that Hume understands scientific explanation as aiming at explaining the inductively-established universal regularities discovered in experience via an appeal to the nature of the substance underlying manifest phenomena. For years, scholars have taken Hume to employ a deliberately shallow and demonstrably untenable notion of scientific explanation. By contrast, Hume’s Science of Human Nature sets (...)
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