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David M. Holley [33]David Marlin Holley [1]
  1. Information Disclosure in Sales.David M. Holley - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (6):631-641.
    Moral intuitions vary with regard to how much information a salesperson needs to disclose to a potential buyer. Through an analysis of the social role of salesperson and ethical argument, it is established that there is a general obligation to disclose what a buyer would need to make a reasonable judgment about whether to purchase the product. This rule is interpreted and shown to be superior to alternatives when appropriately qualified.
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  2.  71
    A Moral Evaluation of Sales Practices.David M. Holley - 1986 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 5 (1):3-21.
  3. Religious disagreements and epistemic rationality.David M. Holley - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (1):33-48.
    Richard Feldman has argued that in cases of religious disagreement between epistemic peers who have shared all relevant evidence, epistemic rationality requires suspense of judgment. I argue that Feldman’s postulation of completely shared evidence is unrealistic for the kinds of disputes he is considering, since different starting points will typically produce different assessments of what the evidence is and how it should be weighed. Feldman argues that there cannot be equally reasonable starting points, but his extension of the postulate of (...)
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  4.  73
    How can a believer doubt that God exists?David M. Holley - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):746-761.
    How can someone confidently believe that God exists, but also have moments of serious doubt about whether the belief is true? A religiously significant belief that God exists is a by-product of adopting a perceptual framing narrative which presupposes God's existence. Using such a narrative is a type of skilled performance that results in an awareness of theistic significance which may at times be disrupted. At such times, doubts may arise about theistic meanings, which can exist in tension with confidence (...)
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  5.  35
    Alternative Approaches to Applied Ethics.David M. Holley - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (1):73-82.
    Tom Carson’s recent paper on “Deception and Withholding Information in Sales” contains a critique of my contribution to sales ethics. In this response I outline the approach I develop in two earlier papers and address the four criticisms Carson makes. These criticisms are largely based on a misunderstanding of my position. I suggest that our fundamentally different approaches to applied ethics may lie at the root of Carson’s misunderstanding. Carson uses what I call a theory-application model in which the search (...)
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  6.  22
    Confident Religious Faith and Intellectual Virtue.David M. Holley - 2017 - International Philosophical Quarterly 57 (2):211-226.
    Religious communities that speak of faith typically affirm the ideal of a highly confident faith. If we understand confidence in terms of the quality of assent to faith-claims, however, it is difficult to reconcile a high degree of confidence with intellectual virtue. As an alternative, I propose to construe confident faith as a kind of trusting perception. The sort of confidence that I envision here makes sense as a religious ideal. In addition it leaves room for the recognition of epistemic (...)
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  7.  38
    Breaking the rules when others do.David M. Holley - 1997 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):159–168.
    People often speak as if the behaviour of others is relevant to the question of whether they are justified in violating a rule. This paper explores three lines of argument which might be used to justify rule violation on grounds appealing to what others do. The appeal to self‐defence as a justification does not succeed, since it must expand the concept to involve a cumbersome weighing of harms. The argument that complying with a rule may involve too great a sacrifice (...)
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  8.  34
    Should Believers Be Interested in Arguments for God's Existence?David M. Holley - 1983 - American Philosophical Quarterly 20 (4):383 - 389.
  9.  42
    The role of anthropomorphism in Hume's critique of theism.David M. Holley - 2002 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 51 (2):83-99.
  10. Treating God's Existence as an Explanatory Hypothesis.David M. Holley - 2010 - American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):377-388.
    When theists and atheists argue about the existence of God, the dispute is most often framed by a shared assumption: that the appropriate way to consider God's existence is to think of it as a hypothesis posited to explain observational data. Theists argue that such a hypothesis provides the best explanation for agreed-upon facts, while atheists argue that no such explanation is needed or that theistic explanation is incoherent. This way of structuring discussion of God's existence interprets the question as (...)
     
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  11.  9
    Life‐Orienting Stories.David M. Holley - 2010 - In Meaning and Mystery. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 11–30.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Life‐Orienting Beliefs Belief in God Religious Belief and Its Counterfeits Alternative Stories Orienting Stories and Truth Fallibilism Notes.
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  12.  3
    Anthropomorphism and Mystery.David M. Holley - 2010 - In Meaning and Mystery. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 109–128.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Mental Toolkits God as Personal Agent Anthropomorphism Perfect Being Theology Do Words Apply? Alternatives to God as Agent God as Object and Subject Notes.
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  13.  18
    Argument and Rhetoric in Philosophy.David M. Holley - 1982 - Philosophy Today 26 (3):272-281.
    Although philosophic tradition has often drawn a sharp contrast between philosophy and rhetoric, Philosophical argument exhibits a rhetorical dimension. Attempts to eliminate the rhetorical aspect have been unsuccessful. Nevertheless, The nature of philosophy requires the philosopher to seek to transcend particular rhetorical contexts by imagining the possibility of challenging what is not in fact challenged.
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  14.  5
    Belief As a Practical Issue.David M. Holley - 2010 - In Meaning and Mystery. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 90–108.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Examining Presuppositions? Forced Choices Burden of Proof and Default Positions A Misleading Picture Thinking About A Way of Life: A Case Study Notes.
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  15.  6
    Conviction, Doubt, and Humility.David M. Holley - 2010 - In Meaning and Mystery. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 192–213.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Conflicting Truth Claims Hick's Pluralism Responses to Religious Diversity Openness to Other Traditions Attitudes Toward Those Who Disagree Certainty and Doubt Is God a Hypothesis? The Practice of Belief Notes.
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  16.  26
    Disengaged Reason and Belief in God.David M. Holley - 2002 - Faith and Philosophy 19 (3):317-330.
  17.  5
    God of the Philosophers.David M. Holley - 2010 - In Meaning and Mystery. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 31–50.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Religious Questions and Metaphysical Questions God of the Philosophers The Kind of Belief that Matters Philosophical Foundations What Metaphysical Reasoning Can Do Belief and Experience Notes.
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  18.  4
    Meaning and Mystery: What It Means to Believe in God.David M. Holley - 2009 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Meaning and Mystery_ offers a challenge to the way Philosophy has traditionally approached the issue of belief in God as a theoretical problem, proposing instead a form of reflection more appropriate to the practical nature of the issue. Makes use of abundant illustrative material, from both literature, such as _Les Misérables_, Edwin Abott’s _Flatland_, Yann Martel’s _Life of Pi_ and Leo Tolstoy’s _A Confession_, and popular culture, such as advertisements, the television series _Joan of Arcadia_ and the film _Stranger Than (...)
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  19. Meaning and Mystery: What It Means to Believe in God.David M. Holley - 2009 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Meaning and Mystery_ offers a challenge to the way Philosophy has traditionally approached the issue of belief in God as a theoretical problem, proposing instead a form of reflection more appropriate to the practical nature of the issue. Makes use of abundant illustrative material, from both literature, such as _Les Misérables_, Edwin Abott’s _Flatland_, Yann Martel’s _Life of Pi_ and Leo Tolstoy’s _A Confession_, and popular culture, such as advertisements, the television series _Joan of Arcadia_ and the film _Stranger Than (...)
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  20.  44
    Meaning and Mystery: What It Means to Believe in God.David M. Holley - 2009 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Meaning and Mystery_ offers a challenge to the way Philosophy has traditionally approached the issue of belief in God as a theoretical problem, proposing instead a form of reflection more appropriate to the practical nature of the issue. Makes use of abundant illustrative material, from both literature, such as _Les Misérables_, Edwin Abott’s _Flatland_, Yann Martel’s _Life of Pi_ and Leo Tolstoy’s _A Confession_, and popular culture, such as advertisements, the television series _Joan of Arcadia_ and the film _Stranger Than (...)
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  21.  2
    Meaning and the Limits of Meaning.David M. Holley - 2010 - In Meaning and Mystery. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 173–191.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Complaining About God God as Micro‐Manager Philosophical Questions and Religious Questions Finding Meaning in Life Is God Needed for Meaning? Notes.
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  22.  5
    Naturalistic Stories.David M. Holley - 2010 - In Meaning and Mystery. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 129–150.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Naturalism, Science, and Scientism The Naturalist Vision The Appeal of a Nonreligious Way of Life Naturalist Values Naturalism and Moral Order The Place of Authoritative Norms Is Naturalism a Faith Position? Notes.
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  23.  4
    Resistance and Receptivity.David M. Holley - 2010 - In Meaning and Mystery. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 69–89.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Truth and Receptivity Receptivity and God Overwhelming Evidence Sufficient Evidence Pascal and the Search for God Brainwashing Yourself? The Practice of Atheism Resisting Belief Notes.
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  24.  20
    Rhetorical Duties of the Physician.David M. Holley - 1987 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (4):37-43.
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  25.  7
    Reasons for Believing in God.David M. Holley - 2010 - In Meaning and Mystery. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 51–68.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Theoretical and Practical Points of View Life‐Orienting Stories Stories About God Reflecting on a Theistic Story Attitudes and the Discernment of Meaning Priority of the Story Notes.
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  26.  72
    Self-Interest and Integrity.David M. Holley - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (1):5-22.
    Philosophical discussions of the conflict between morality and self-interest typically proceed on the assumption that we have a relatively unproblematic understanding of self-interest. That assumption can be challenged by asking how to relate acts of self-interest and acts of integrity. I argue that when we are talking about motivations, it is better to keep the motivation of self-interest distinct from the motivation of integrity. But the term “self-interest” can also be used to refer to an end, and acts of integrity (...)
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  27.  4
    Suggestions for Further Reading.David M. Holley - 2010 - In Meaning and Mystery. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 214–221.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Asking for Reasons Narrative Framing Alternative Narratives Revelation and Reason Mystery Notes.
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  28.  49
    Sidgwick's problem.David M. Holley - 2002 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (1):45-65.
    Henry Sidgwick regarded his failure to reconcile the claims of rational egoism with those of utilitarianism to reveal a fundamental contradiction within practical reason. However, the conflict that concerns him arises only in relation to a particular kind of agent. While Sidgwick construes his version of the problem to be a systematic formulation of a conflict that arises within the practical reasoning of ordinary people, it is actually an example of a worst-case scenario that reflects the common philosophical tendency to (...)
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  29.  4
    Theistic and Naturalistic Morality.David M. Holley - 2010 - In Meaning and Mystery. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 151–172.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Is God Relevant to Determining What is Right or Wrong? Divine Revelation and Morality Submission and Autonomy Fanaticism Rewards and Punishments Morality and Happiness Transformative Ideals An Objection to Religious Motivation Notes.
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  30.  27
    Using Self-Interest to Teach Ethics.David M. Holley - 2001 - Teaching Philosophy 24 (3):219-232.
    When questioned about what ought to be done in a particular scenario, students often ignore moral considerations and appeal to what is in an individual’s self-interest. This paper shows how an instructor can use a student’s habitual inclination to think in a self-interested fashion to guide them into thinking about moral considerations. Rather than drawing a sharp distinction between self-interested thinking and moral considerations, a more plausible account contends that self-interested thinking does not function independently of moral considerations. That is, (...)
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  31.  27
    Voluntary Death, Property Rights, and the Gift of Life.David M. Holley - 1989 - Journal of Religious Ethics 17 (1):103 - 121.
    Claims that life is God's property or that life is God's gift have been prominent among reasons for rejecting the choice of death as morally legitimate. This essay examines the worth of arguments based upon such claims, considering what assumptions these arguments would require and what implications an approach based on them might have for particular types of cases. The essay concludes with a reflection on the role of significant metaphors in moral judgment.
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  32.  45
    Everyone's doing it: Common practice and moral judgment. [REVIEW]David M. Holley - 1997 - Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (3):369-380.
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