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David McNeill [25]David N. McNeill [7]David Neil Mcneill [1]
  1.  16
    Gesture and Thought.David McNeill - 2005 - University of Chicago Press.
    In Gesture and Thought he brings together years of this research, arguing that gesturing, an act which has been popularly understood as an accessory to speech, ...
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  2.  2
    So You Think Gestures Are Nonverbal?David McNeill - 1985 - Psychological Review 92 (3):350-371.
  3. The "Tip of the Tongue" Phenomenon.R. Brown & David N. McNeill - 1966 - Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior 5:325-37.
     
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  4. Speech-Gesture Mismatches: Evidence for One Underlying Representation of Linguistic and Nonlinguistic Information.Justine Cassell, David McNeill & Karl-Erik McCullough - 1999 - Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 7 (1):1-34.
    Adults and children spontaneously produce gestures while they speak, and such gestures appear to support and expand on the information communicated by the verbal channel. Little research, however, has been carried out to examine the role played by gesture in the listener's representation of accumulating information. Do listeners attend to the gestures that accompany narrative speech? In what kinds of relationships between gesture and speech do listeners attend to the gestural channel? If listeners do attend to information received in gesture, (...)
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  5.  1
    Silence is Liberating: Removing the Handcuffs on Grammatical Expression in the Manual Modality.Susan Goldin-Meadow, David McNeill & Jenny Singleton - 1996 - Psychological Review 103 (1):34-55.
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  6.  89
    Gesture Following Deafferentation: A Phenomenologically Informed Experimental Study.Jonathan Cole, Shaun Gallagher & David McNeill - 2002 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (1):49-67.
    Empirical studies of gesture in a subject who has lost proprioception and the sense of touch from the neck down show that specific aspects of gesture remain normal despite abnormal motor processes for instrumental movement. The experiments suggest that gesture, as a linguistic phenomenon, is not reducible to instrumental movement. They also support and extend claims made by Merleau-Ponty concerning the relationship between language and cognition. Gesture, as language, contributes to the accomplishment of thought.
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  7.  31
    Growth Points in Thinking-for-Speaking.David McNeill & Susan D. Duncan - manuscript
    Many bilingual speakers believe they engage in different forms of thinking when they shift languages. This experience of entering different thought worlds can be explained with the hypothesis that languages induce different forms of `thinking-for-speaking'-- thinking generated, as Slobin (1987) says, because of the requirements of a linguistic code. "`Thinking for speaking' involves picking those characteristics that (a) fit some conceptualization of the event, and (b) are readily encodable in the language"[2] (p. 435). That languages differ in their thinking-for-speaking demands (...)
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  8.  46
    Antigone's Autonomy.David N. McNeill - 2011 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (5):411 - 441.
    Abstract Sophocles' Antigone contains the first recorded instance of the word α?τ ? ?????, the source for our word ?autonomous?. I argue that reflection upon the human aspiration toward autonomy is central to that work. I begin by focusing on the difficulty readers of the play have determining whether Antigone's actions in the play should be considered autonomous and then suggest that recognizing this difficulty is crucial to a proper understanding of the play. The very aspects of Antigone's character that (...)
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  9.  34
    Growth Points From the Very Beginning.David McNeill, Susan Duncan, Jonathan Cole, Shaun Gallagher & Bennett Bertenthal - 2010 - In M. Arbib D. Bickerton (ed.), The Emergence of Protolanguage: Holophrasis Vs Compositionality. John Benjamins. pp. 117-132.
    Did protolanguage users use discrete words that referred to objects, actions, locations, etc., and then, at some point, combine them; or on the contrary did they have words that globally indexed whole semantic complexes, and then come to divide them? Our answer is: early humans were forming language units consisting of global and discrete dimensions of semiosis in dynamic opposition. These units of thinking-for-speaking, or ‘growth points’ (GPs) were, jointly, analog imagery (visuo-spatio-motoric) and categorically-contrastive (-emic) linguistic encodings. This discrete-global duality (...)
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  10.  31
    Social Freedom and Self-Actualization: “Normative Reconstruction” as a Theory of Justice.David N. McNeill - 2015 - Critical Horizons 16 (2):153-169.
    In Freedom's Right Axel Honneth seeks to provide a theory of justice by appropriating Hegel's account of ethical substance in the Philosophy of Right, but he wants to do so without endorsing Hegel's more robust idealist commitments. I argue that this project can only succeed if Honneth can offer an alternative, comparatively robust demonstration of the rationality and normative coherence of existing social institutions. I contend that the grounds Honneth provides for this claim are insufficient for his purposes. In particular, (...)
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  11.  48
    Gesture-First, but No Gestures?David McNeill, Bennett Bertenthal, Jonathan Cole & Shaun Gallagher - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):138-139.
    Although Arbib's extension of the mirror-system hypothesis neatly sidesteps one problem with the “gesture-first” theory of language origins, it overlooks the importance of gestures that occur in current-day human linguistic performance, and this lands it with another problem. We argue that, instead of gesture-first, a system of combined vocalization and gestures would have been a more natural evolutionary unit.
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  12.  16
    Social Cognition and Primacy of Movement Revisited.Shaun Gallagher, Jonathan Cole & David McNeill - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (4):155-156.
  13.  48
    Aristotle's Dialogue with Socrates: On the Nicomachean Ethics.David McNeill - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (2):299-301.
  14.  1
    Iconic Gestures of Children and Adults.David Mcneill - 1986 - Semiotica 62 (1-2):107-128.
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  15.  15
    Implementing a Non-Modular Theory of Language Production in an Embodied.Timo Sowa, Stefan Kopp, Susan Duncan, David McNeill & Ipke Wachsmuth - 2008 - In Ipke Wachsmuth, Manuela Lenzen & Günther Knoblich (eds.), Embodied Communication in Humans and Machines. Oxford University Press.
  16.  29
    Bad Conscience and the Origin of Temporality.David McNeill - 2007 - International Studies in Philosophy 39 (3):149-161.
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  17.  5
    Action, Thought and Language.David McNeill - 1981 - Cognition 10 (1-3):201-208.
  18.  2
    A Straight Path—to Where? Reply to Butterworth and Hadar.David McNeill - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (1):175-179.
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  19.  24
    Human Discourse, Eros, and Madness in Plato's "Republic".David N. McNeill - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (2):235 - 268.
  20.  5
    Speech-Gesture Mismatches: Evidence for One Underlying Representation of Linguistic and Nonlinguistic Information.Justine Cassell, David McNeill & Karl-Erik McCullough - 1999 - Pragmatics and Cognition 7 (1):1-34.
    Adults and children spontaneously produce gestures while they speak, and such gestures appear to support and expand on the information communicated by the verbal channel. Little research, however, has been carried out to examine the role played by gesture in the listener's representation of accumulating information. Do listeners attend to the gestures that accompany narrative speech? In what kinds of relationships between gesture and speech do listeners attend to the gestural channel? If listeners do attend to information received in gesture, (...)
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  21.  13
    Editorial Introduction/Shaun Gallagher First-Person Thoughts and Embodied Self-Awareness: Some Re-Flections on the Relation Between Recent Analytical Philosophy and Phenomenology/Dan Zahavi Philosophy and the 'Anteriority Complex'/Alan Murray.David McNeill - 2002 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1:427-429.
  22.  19
    The Will to Power.David N. McNeill - 2004 - International Studies in Philosophy 36 (3):15-28.
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  23.  4
    The Will to Power: Psychology as First Philosophy.David N. Mcneill - 2004 - International Studies in Philosophy 36 (3):15-28.
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  24. History Redux: Japan's Textbook Battle Reignites.David McNeill - forthcoming - Sophia.
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  25.  5
    Abstract deixis.David Mcneill, Justine Cassell & Elena T. Levy - 1993 - Semiotica 95 (1-2):5-20.
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  26.  1
    So You Do Think Gestures Are Nonverbalp Reply to Feyereisen.David McNeill - 1987 - Psychological Review 94 (4):499-504.
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  27. M Raw.An Invisible Performative Argument, Geoffrey Leech, Robert T. Harms, Richard E. Palmer, Arnolds Grava, Tadeusz Batog, J. Kurylowicz, Dan I. Slobin, David McNeill & R. A. Close - 1973 - Foundations of Language 9:294.
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  28.  2
    An Image of the Soul in Speech: Plato and the Problem of Socrates.David N. McNeill - 2010 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    In this book, David McNeill illuminates Plato’s distinctive approach to philosophy by examining how his literary portrayal of Socrates manifests an essential interdependence between philosophic and ethical inquiry. In particular, McNeill demonstrates how Socrates’s confrontation with profound ethical questions about his public philosophic activity is the key to understanding the distinctively mimetic, dialogic, and reflexive character of Socratic philosophy. Taking a cue from Nietzsche’s account of “the problem of Socrates,” McNeill shows how the questions Nietzsche raises are questions that, in (...)
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  29. Analogic/Analytic Representations and Cross-Linguistic Differences in Thinking for Speaking.David McNeill - 2001 - Cognitive Linguistics 11 (1-2).
  30. Gesture and Thought.David McNeill - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    David McNeill, a pioneer in the ongoing study of the relationship between gesture and language, here argues that gestures are active participants in both speaking and thinking. He posits that gestures are key ingredients in an “imagery-language dialectic” that fuels speech and thought. The smallest unit of this dialectic is the growth point, a snapshot of an utterance at its beginning psychological stage. In _Gesture and Thought,_ the central growth point comes from a Tweety Bird cartoon. Over the course of (...)
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  31. Speech-Gesture Mimicry in Performance: An Actor → Audience, Author → Actor, Audience → Actor Triangle.David McNeill - 2015 - Journal for Cultural Research 19 (1):15-29.
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  32. The Acquisition of Language: The Study of Developmental Psycholinguistics.David Mcneill - 1972 - Foundations of Language 9 (2):288-294.