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David Morris
Concordia University
  1. A Dynamic Systems Approach to the Development of Cognition and Action.David Morris, E. Thelen & L. B. Smith - 1997 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 11 (2).
  2. Merleau-Ponty's Developmental Ontology.David Morris - 2019 - Carbondale, IL, USA: Northwestern University Press.
    Merleau-Ponty's Developmental Ontology shows how the philosophy of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, from its very beginnings, seeks to find sense or meaning within nature, and how this quest calls for and develops into a radically new ontology. -/- David Morris first gives an illuminating analysis of sense, showing how it requires understanding nature as engendering new norms. He then presents innovative studies of Merleau-Ponty's The Structure of Behavior and Phenomenology of Perception, revealing how these early works are oriented by the problem of (...)
     
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  3. Illness and Culture in the Postmodern Age.David B. Morris - 1998
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  4. The Sense of Space.David Morris - 2004 - State University of New York Press.
    A phenomenological account of spatial perception in relation to the lived body. -/- The Sense of Space brings together space and body to show that space is a plastic environment, charged with meaning, that reflects the distinctive character of human embodiment in the full range of its moving, perceptual, emotional, expressive, developmental, and social capacities. Drawing on the philosophies of Merleau-Ponty and Bergson, as well as contemporary psychology to develop a renewed account of the moving, perceiving body, the book suggests (...)
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  5. The Enigma of Reversibility and the Genesis of Sense in Merleau-Ponty.David Morris - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (2):141-165.
    This article clarifies Merleau-Ponty’s enigmatic, later concept of reversibility by showing how it is connected to the theme of the genesis of sense. The article first traces reversibility through “Eye and Mind” and The Visible and the Invisible , in ways that link reversibility to a theme of the earlier philosophy, namely an interrelation in which activity and passivity reverse to one another. This linkage is deepened through a detailed study of a passage on touch in the Phenomenology ’s chapter (...)
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  6. Diabetes, Chronic Illness and the Bodily Roots of Ecstatic Temporality.David Morris - 2008 - Human Studies 31 (4):399-421.
    This article studies the phenomenology of chronic illness in light of phenomenology’s insights into ecstatic temporality and freedom. It shows how a chronic illness can, in lived experience, manifest itself as a disturbance of our usual relation to ecstatic temporality and thence as a disturbance of freedom. This suggests that ecstatic temporality is related to another sort of time—“provisional time”—that is in turn rooted in the body. The article draws on Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception and Heidegger’s Being and Time , (...)
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  7.  6
    Optimal Relief for Pain at the End of Life: A Caregiver’s Tale.David B. Morris - 2018 - Medical Humanities 44 (2):120-124.
    The current opioid crisis—driven partly by medical overprescription and partly by illegal drug abuse—is a significant cultural and professional dilemma in the USA and elsewhere. It has produced a strong reaction in favour of restricting medical use of opioids for pain, especially chronic pain. The author for a quarter century has written about pain from a biocultural perspective, and in this essay—based on his experience as primary caregiver for his late wife—he approaches the question of appropriate opioid use at the (...)
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  8. Animals and Humans, Thinking and Nature.David Morris - 2005 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (1):49-72.
    Studies that compare human and animal behaviour suspend prejudices about mind, body and their relation, by approaching thinking in terms of behaviour. Yet comparative approaches typically engage another prejudice, motivated by human social and bodily experience: taking the lone animal as the unit of comparison. This prejudice informs Heidegger’s and Merleau-Ponty’s comparative studies, and conceals something important: that animals moving as a group in an environment can develop new sorts of “sense.” The study of animal group-life suggests a new way (...)
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  9.  35
    Touching Intelligence.David Morris - 2002 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 29 (149-162):149-162.
    Touch requires that one move in concert with one's tactile object. This provokes the question how joint movement of this sort yields perception of tactile qualities of the object vs. tactile qualities of an object-augmented body. Phenomenological analysis together with results of dynamic systems theory (in psychology) suggest that the difference stems from 'resonant' vs. 'reverberant' modalities of body-object movement. The further suggestion is that tactile movement is itself a form of discriminative intelligence, and that the peculiar intimacy of touch (...)
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  10.  1
    Bridging Political Divides: Perceived Threat and Uncertainty Avoidance Help Explain the Relationship Between Political Ideology and Immigrant Attitudes Within Diverse Intergroup Contexts.Brandon D. Stewart, Fyqa Gulzaib & David S. M. Morris - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  11.  98
    Bergsonian Intuition, Husserlian Variation, Peirceian Abduction: Toward a Relation Between Method, Sense and Nature.David Morris - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (2):267-298.
    Husserlian variation, Bergsonian intuition and Peircean abduction are contrasted as methodological responses to the traditional philosophical problem of deriving knowledge of universals from singulars. Each method implies a correspondingly different view of the generation of the variations from which knowledge is derived. To make sense of the latter differences, and to distinguish the different sorts of variation sought by philosophers and scientists, a distinction between extensive, intensive, and abductive-intensive variation is introduced. The link between philosophical method and the generation of (...)
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  12.  14
    How to Speak Postmodern: Medicine, Illness, and Cultural Change.David B. Morris - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (6):7-16.
  13.  67
    Reversibility and Ereignis: On Being as Kantian Imagination in Merleau-Ponty and Heidegger.David Morris - 2008 - Philosophy Today 52 (Supplement):135-143.
    This paper aims to clarify Merleau-Ponty’s difficult concept of “reversibility” by interpreting it as resuming the dialectical critique of the rationalist and empiricist tradition that informs Merleau-Ponty’s earlier work. The focus is on reversibility in “Eye and Mind,” as dismantling the traditional dualism of activity and passivity. This clarification also puts reversibility in continuity with the Phenomenology’s appropriation of Kant, letting us note an affiliation between Merleau-Ponty’s reversibility and Heidegger’s Ereignis: in each case being itself already performs the operation that (...)
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  14. The Time and Place of the Organism: Merleau-Ponty's Philosophy in Embryo.David Morris - 2008 - Alter: revue de phénoménologie 16:69-86.
    Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy attempts to locate meaning-sense-within being. Space and time are thus ingredient in sense. This is apparent in his earlier studies of structure, fields, expression and the body schema, and the linkage of space, time and sense becomes thematic in Merleau-Ponty’s later thinking about institution, chiasm and reversibility. But the space-time-sense linkage is also apparent in his studies of embryogenesis. The paper shows this by reconstructing Merleau-Ponty’s critical analysis of Driesch’s embryology (in the nature lectures) to demonstrate how, for (...)
     
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  15. What Is Living and What Is Non-Living in Merleau-Ponty’s Philosophy of Movement and Expression.David Morris - 2005 - Chiasmi International 7:225-238.
    In ancient philosophy life has priority: non-living matter is made intelligible by living activity. The modern evolutionary synthesis reverses this priority: life is a passive result of blind, non-living material processes. But recent work in science and philosophy puts that reversal in question, by emphasizing how living beings are self-organizing and active. “Naturalizing” this new emphasis on living activity requires not simply a return to ancient philosophy but a new ontology, a new concept of nature. To explore that ontology, I (...)
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  16.  79
    Ecstatic Body, Ecstatic Nature: Perception as Breaking with the World.David Morris - 2006 - Chiasmi International 8:201-217.
    I survey some unusual phenomena in which the body seems to be projected into other things. I argue that these phenomena should not be understood as illusions, as erroneous distortions of an objective body, but as indicating that the body is first of all a being absorbed in outside things. The usual questions about perception are thus reversed: the question is not how the outside world is represented in an inside, but how a moving body ecstatically absorbed in things ever (...)
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  17.  77
    Merleau-Ponty, Passivity, and Science. From Structure, Sense and Expression, to Life as Phenomenal Field, Via the Regulatory Genome.David Morris - 2012 - Chiasmi International 14:89-112.
    Merleau-Ponty, la passivité et la scienceJe soutiens qu’il y a plus en jeu dans l’intérêt de Merleau-Ponty pour la science qu’une simple dialectique entre disciplines. C’est parce que son évolutionméthodologique le conduit à trouver dans la science un moyen spécifique d’approfondir ses recherches ontologiques, que celle-ci hante de plus en plus sa philosophie. En effet, dans le chapitre « champ phénoménal » de la Phénoménologie de la perception, il est possible de rapprocher certains aspects de son défi méthodologique et l’idée (...)
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  18.  40
    The Open Figure of Experience and Mind.David Morris - 2006 - Dialogue 45 (2):315-326.
    This review of John Russon's Human Experience: Philosophy, Neurosis, and the Elements of Everyday Life focuses on Russon's position that experience is open (having a developmental, situated and dynamic, rather than fixed, structure) and figured (having a structure inseparable from forms of bodily function), and that mind is something learned in the process of working out experience as figured and open. These themes are drawn together in relation to recent scientific discussions (e.g., of bodily dynamics, mirror neurons, robotic systems and (...)
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  19.  64
    The Logic of the Body in Bergson's Motor Schemes and Merleau-Ponty's Body Schema.David Morris - 2000 - Philosophy Today 44 (Supplement):60-69.
  20.  8
    Merleau-Ponty, Passivity, and Science. From Structure, Sense and Expression, to Life as Phenomenal Field, Via the Regulatory Genome.David Morris - 2012 - Chiasmi International 14:89-112.
    Merleau-Ponty, la passivité et la scienceJe soutiens qu’il y a plus en jeu dans l’intérêt de Merleau-Ponty pour la science qu’une simple dialectique entre disciplines. C’est parce que son évolutionméthodologique le conduit à trouver dans la science un moyen spécifique d’approfondir ses recherches ontologiques, que celle-ci hante de plus en plus sa philosophie. En effet, dans le chapitre « champ phénoménal » de la Phénoménologie de la perception, il est possible de rapprocher certains aspects de son défi méthodologique et l’idée (...)
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  21.  17
    The Chirality of Being: Exploring a Merleau-Ponteian Ontology of Sense.David Morris - 2011 - Chiasmi International: Trilingual Studies Concerning Merleau-Ponty’s Thought 12:165-182.
    Le chiasme de l’être: une exploration de l’ontologie du sens de Merleau-PontyLa question de l’ontologie inclut celle de savoir comment un être se détermine et acquiert son sens, autrement dit comment il instaure sa différenciation par desorientations, des significations et des différences en général. Cette étude explore l’idée que le sens d’un être provient d’une « chiralité ontologique », c’est-à-dire d’un type de différence ontologique présentant un apparentement caractéristique de ses deux côtés droit et gauche. L’étude montre tout d’abord comment (...)
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  22. Body.David Morris - 2008 - In Rosalyn Diprose & Jack Reynolds (eds.), Merleau-ponty: Key Concepts. Acumen Publishing. pp. 111-120.
    This chapter studies the theme of the body in Merleau-Ponty by first showing how it is anticipated in The Structure of Behaviour and is central to the Phenomenology of Perception. In addition to illuminating Merleau-Ponty's concept of the body, the aim is to show how the body is, for Merleau-Ponty, a key methodological term, since it marks philosophy's inherent openness to something prephilosophical, to which philosophy must be responsible. The chapter shows how this openness and the body's expressive role in (...)
     
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  23. Review Essays-Getting Back Into Place: Toward a Renewed Understanding of the Place-World.Edward S. Casey & David Morris - 1999 - Continental Philosophy Review 32 (1):37.
  24. Review Essays-The Fate of Place: A Philosophical History.Edward S. Casey & David Morris - 1999 - Continental Philosophy Review 32 (1):37-48.
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    Light as Environment: Medicine, Health, and Values.David B. Morris - 2002 - Journal of Medical Humanities 23 (1):7-29.
    Light is strangely absent from most accounts of the environment. From photosynthesis to vitamin D, however, light is central to human well-being. Human circadian rhythms are keyed the alternation of dark and light. Erosion of the ozone layer makes skin cancer a growing threat from excess ultraviolet radiation. Light plays a significant role in health and illness. In changing historical circumstances, light continues to evoke and to express significant issues of value.
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  26.  10
    Schizo-Culture: The Event, the Book.Sylvère Lotringer & David Morris (eds.) - 2014 - MIT Press.
    I think "schizo-culture" here is being used rather in a special sense. Not referring to clinical schizophrenia, but to the fact that the culture is divided up into all sorts of classes and groups, etc., and that some of the old lines are breaking down. And that this is a healthy sign. -- William Burroughs, from _Schizo-Culture_ The legendary 1975 "Schizo-Culture" conference, conceived by the early Semiotext collective, began as an attempt to introduce the then-unknown radical philosophies of post-'68 France (...)
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  27. Affect as Transcendental Condition of Activity Vs. Passivity, and of Natural Science.David Morris - 2016 - In Jack Reynolds & Ricky Seybold (eds.), Phenomenology and Science. New York, NY, USA: pp. 103-119.
    The distinction between activity and passivity has a deep and fundamental role in scientific and philosophical conceptual frameworks, going back to ancient Greek thinking about society and nature. I briefly indicate the importance of the activity-passivity distinction in the phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty, in relation to Husserl. I then advance a transcendental phenomenological argument that the distinction is, however, not as simple or obvious as it might appear, specifically that it cannot be wholly and determinately defined via a purely abstract, conceptual-discursive (...)
     
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  28.  35
    Burning Down the House: Bitcoin, Carbon-Capitalism, and the Problem of Trustless Systems.David Morris - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (1):161-162.
  29.  19
    Bringing Phenomenology Down to Earth: Passivity, Development, and Merleau-Ponty’s Transformation of Philosophy.David Morris - 2014 - Chiasmi International 16:25-39.
    I suggest how Merleau-Pontian sense hinges on an ontology in which passivity and what I call “development” are fundamental. This means, though, that the possibility of philosophy cannot be guaranteed in advance: philosophy is a joint operation of philosophers and being, and is radically contingent on a pre-philosophical field. Merleau-Ponty thus transforms philosophy, revealing a philosophy of tomorrow: a new way of doing philosophy that, because it is grounded in pre-reflective contingency, has to wait to describe its beginnings, and so (...)
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  30. Concordance of Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception.David Morris, Andrew Robinson & Catherine Duchastel - manuscript
    This is a concordance of page numbers in the following editions of Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception: English editions prior to the Routledge Classics 2002; Routledge Classics edition, with the new pagination; the French edition from Gallimard, prior to 2005; the 2e edition from Gallimard, 2005, with new pagination.
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  31. Casey’s Subliminal Phenomenology: On Edging Things Back Into Place.David Morris - 2013 - In Donald A. Landes & Azucena Cruz Pierre (eds.), Exploring the Work of Edward S. Casey: Giving Voice to Place, Memory, and Imagination. pp. 53-61.
    In this chapter I suggest how Casey’s work opens some radical implications for phenomenology. Casey does this by showing that place is what first of all grants room for the appearance of things—but only in virtue of a non givenness. That is, place undergirds determinate things only in being something “less” than fully delimited or determinate, something less than space would be as an already given dimension. Place thus echoes Bergson’s durée as openly generative becoming, in contrast to time as (...)
     
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  32. Edward Casey: Subliminal Hermeneutics in the Wake of Place.David Morris - 2017 - In Bruce Janz (ed.), Place, Space, and Hermeneutics. pp. 289-300.
    Edward S. Casey’s rich and detailed work on place (now spanning at least seven books) harbors many insights regarding the hermeneutics of place—even though he does not directly address this topic under that heading. So I begin by briefly mapping his work in its relevance to the hermeneutics of place. This lets me descry an underlying methodological and conceptual trajectory that contextualizes the main task of this chapter, namely, articulating two of Casey’s distinctive contributions to the hermeneutics of place, and (...)
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  33. Elliot L. Jurist, Beyond Hegel and Nietzsche: Philosophy, Culture, and Agency Reviewed By.David Morris - 2002 - Philosophy in Review 22 (3):192-194.
     
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  34. Edward S. Casey: Getting Back Into Place: Toward a Renewed Understanding of the Place-World and Edward S. Casey: The Fate of Place: A Philosophical History. [REVIEW]David Morris - 1999 - Continental Philosophy Review 32 (1):37-48.
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  35. Faces and the Invisible of the Visible: Toward an Animal Ontology.David Morris - 2007 - Phaenex: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture 2 (2).
    This paper studies the role of faces in animal life to gain insight into Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy, especially his later ontology. The relation between animal faces and moving, animal bodies involves a peculiar, expressive logic. This logic echoes the physiognomic structure of perception that Merleau-Ponty detects in his earlier philosophy, and exemplifies and clarifies a logic elemental to his later ontology, especially to his concept of an invisible that is of the visible. The question why the logic of the face can (...)
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  36. Faces and the Invisible of the Visible: Toward an Animal Ontology.David Morris - 2007 - PhaenEx 2 (2):124-169.
    This paper studies the role of faces in animal life to gain insight into Merleau-Ponty's philosophy, especially his later ontology. The relation between animal faces and moving, animal bodies involves a peculiar, expressive logic. This logic echoes the physiognomic structure of perception that Merleau-Ponty detects in his earlier philosophy, and exemplifies and clarifies a logic elemental to his later ontology, especially to his concept of an invisible that is of (endogenous to) the visible. The question why the logic of the (...)
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  37.  19
    From “Block-Things” to “Time-Things”: Merleau-Ponty’s temporal ontology in part two of the phenomenology of perception.David Morris - 2020 - Continental Philosophy Review 53 (1):1-19.
    Scholars such as Renaud Barbara and Bernhard Waldenfels and Regula Giuliani have emphasized time’s central role in Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy, and Michael Kelly has shown how the Phenomenology’s “Temporality” chapter already broaches his later ontological concerns. I deepen our understanding of this temporal–ontological nexus by showing how Merleau-Ponty’s temporal ontology in fact erupts even earlier in the Phenomenology, as an underlying theme that unifies part two, on “The Perceived World,” as leading into the “Temporality” chapter. I do this via a close (...)
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  38. From the Nature of Meaning to a Phenomenological Refiguring of Nature.David Morris - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:317-341.
    I argue that reconciling nature with human experience requires a new ontology in which nature is refigured as being in and of itself meaningful, thus reconfiguring traditional dualisms and the . But this refiguring of nature entails a method in which nature itself can exhibit its conceptual reconfiguration—otherwise we get caught in various conceptual and methodological problems that surreptitiously reduplicate the problem we are seeking to resolve. I first introduce phenomenology as a methodology fit to this task, then show how (...)
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  39. ‘Here, by Experiment’: Edgar Wood in Middleton.David Morris - 2012 - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 89 (1):127-160.
    Edgar Wood and Middleton are closely entwined. Until his fifties, Wood engaged in the life of his native town, while his architecture gradually enriched its heritage. The paper begins with Woods character and gives an insight into his wider modus operandi with regard to fellow practitioners. A stylistic appraisal of his surviving Middleton area buildings draws attention to his individual development of Arts and Crafts architecture, a pinnacle of which was Long Street Methodist Church and Schools. The impact of J. (...)
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  40.  74
    Hegel on the Life of the Understanding.David Morris - 2006 - International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (4):403-419.
    This article clarifies Hegel’s argument within “Force and the Understanding” in his Phenomenology of Spirit by developing Hegel’s underlying point through discussion of recent and ongoing issues concerning explanation in natural and psychological science. The latter proceeds by way of a critical discussion of the problem of other minds and the “theory theory of mind.” The article thereby shows how and why Hegel’s analysis of the understanding inaugurates a crucial transition in his Phenomenology, from consciousness toself-consciousness and life. Putting Hegel’s (...)
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  41. Heideggerian Truth and Deleuzian Genesis as Differential 'Grounds' of Philosophy: Review Essay of Miguel de Beistegui's Truth and Genesis: Philosophy as Differential Ontology.David Morris - 2006 - Pli 17:166-183.
  42. Introduction.David Morris - 2017 - Symposium 21 (1):203-205.
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  43. Illusions and Perceptual Norms as Spandrels of the Temporality of Living.David Morris - 2015 - In Maxime Doyon & Thiemo Breyer (eds.), Normativity in Perception. pp. 75-90.
    This chapter challenges the view that perceptual illusions are mistakes, by first of all emphasizing how the concept of illusions-as-mistakes relies on perspectives unavailable within illusory experiences and introduces norms fixed outside such experiences. A study of ‘rubber hand illusions’ suggests how illusions are not mistaken perceptions, but cases in which perceived objects makes a different kind of sense—in virtue of a norm that is not a fixed, objective standard but is ongoingly engendered within the dynamics of living, perceptual behaviour. (...)
     
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  44.  55
    Interrogating Ethics.David Morris - 2007 - Symposium 11 (1):180-183.
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    Interrogating Ethics: Embodying the Good in Merleau-Ponty. [REVIEW]David Morris - 2007 - Symposium 11 (1):180-183.
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  46.  26
    In Mod We Trust? Human Trust, Bitcoin, and the Burning Waste of Time.David Morris - 2018 - AI and Society 33 (2):291-292.
  47.  14
    In Search of Pseudo-Joachim of Fiore: Understanding the So-Called Isaiah Commentary.David Anthony Morris - 2015 - Franciscan Studies 73:255-274.
    Despite his place as one of the most original thinkers of the Middle Ages, the legacy of Joachim of Fiore has eluded clear comprehension in at least two areas, those of texts and transmission. That is, Joachim studies have, until most recently, been limited by a lack of modern editions for Joachim’s works, and by an incomplete understanding of how the revolutionary ideology inspired by a twelfth-century abbot from Calabria ultimately came to be appropriated by disparate groups such as the (...)
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  48.  22
    La piega e lo schema corporeo in Merleau-Ponty e nella teoria dei sistemi dinamici (riassunto).David Morris - 1999 - Chiasmi International 1:286-286.
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    Le pli et Ie schéma corporel chez Merleau-Ponty et dans la théorie des systèmes dynamiques (résumé).David Morris - 1999 - Chiasmi International 1:286-286.
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  50. Lived Time and Absolute Knowing: Habit and Addiction From Infinite Jest to the Phenomenology of Spirit.David Morris - 2001 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 30 (4):375-415.
    A study of habit and other unconscious backgrounds of action shows how shapes of spiritual life in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit each imply correlative senses of lived time. The very form of time thus gives spirit a sensuous encounter with its own concept. The point that conceptual content is manifest in the sensuous form of time is key to an interpretation of Hegel's infamous and puzzling remarks about time and the concept in ``absolute knowing.'' The article also shows how Hegel's (...)
     
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