Results for 'David O���Hara'

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  1.  25
    Good God: The Theistic Foundations of Morality, by David Baggett and Jerry L. Walls.David O'Hara - 2013 - Faith and Philosophy 30 (2):225-228.
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  2.  11
    Frank O’Hara’s “Second Avenue” and the Modernist Tradition.David Dick - 2012 - Colloquy 23.
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  3. What an Entangled Web We Weave: An Information-Centric Approach to Time-Evolving Socio-Technical Systems.Markus Luczak-Roesch, Kieron O’Hara, Jesse David Dinneen & Ramine Tinati - 2018 - Minds and Machines 28 (4):709-733.
    A new layer of complexity, constituted of networks of information token recurrence, has been identified in socio-technical systems such as the Wikipedia online community and the Zooniverse citizen science platform. The identification of this complexity reveals that our current understanding of the actual structure of those systems, and consequently the structure of the entire World Wide Web, is incomplete, which raises novel questions for data science research but also from the perspective of social epistemology. Here we establish the principled foundations (...)
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  4.  11
    Bristol Bay and Pebble Mine: Mutual Flourishing or Midas’ Touch.David L. O’Hara - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):26-28.
  5.  6
    Conversion in American Philosophy.David L. O’Hara - 2004 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 32 (99):43-45.
  6.  32
    C.S. Lewis as Philosopher.David L. O’Hara - 2011 - Faith and Philosophy 28 (1):112-115.
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  7.  16
    Hunting – Philosophy For Everyone: In Search of the Wild Life.David L. O'Hara - 2012 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (1):81-84.
    Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, Volume 6, Issue 1, Page 81-84, February 2012.
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  8. Pragmatism as Transition: Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty.David O'Hara - 2011 - The Pluralist 6 (2):70-74.
    This book is an extended and provocative exercise in describing pragmatism’s past and in attempting to chart a course for its future. This description is not merely a history of philosophy or paean to American thought. It is rather a re-description that draws attention to a neglected and potentially fruitful theme in pragmatism, one that Koopman has termed “transitionalism” for its focus on historicity and temporality. One of the enduring features of pragmatism is its commitment to the revisability of truth (...)
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  9.  18
    Pragmatism as Transition: Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty, Colin Koopman Pragmatism as Transition: Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty Koopman Colin Columbia UP, New York.David O’Hara - 2011 - The Pluralist 6 (2):70-74.
  10.  71
    Peirce, Plato and Miracles: On the Mature Peirce's Re-Discovery of Plato and the Overcoming of Nominalistic Prejudice in History.David L. O'Hara - 2008 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (1):pp. 26-39.
    Twenty-three years ago Robert Ayers noticed several brief and intriguing comments on miracles in the Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce. Working with just those scraps of information from the CP, he stitched together a rough but helpful starting point for understanding this aspect of Peirce's religious and scientific thought. In the last few years several more articles on this subject have been written, each filling in a gap left by the others: Ayers' is a theological view, based solely on (...)
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  11.  33
    The Conduct of Life.David O’Hara - 2009 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 37 (108):28-30.
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  12.  44
    Review: H.G. Callaway (Ed.) R.W. Emerson, The Conduct of Life, A Philosophical Reading. [REVIEW]David O’Hara - 2009 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 37 (108):28-30.
    In the last few years H.G. Callaway has produced several helpful editions of some important texts by Emerson. Emerson's Conduct of Life was originally published in 1860, and it has appeared in a number of editions since then, but Callaway's edition has several noteworthy features that cause it to stand out from the crowd and make it an important contribution to Emerson studies. This is a rare volume that will serve students, academic philosophers, and causal readers alike: a critical edition (...)
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  13. Thinking Through Art: Aesthetic Agency and Global Modernity.Daniel T. O'Hara & Alan Singer - 1998 - Duke University Press.
    In the eighteenth century the category of the aesthetic sought to bridge the gap between the prevalent dualities of Cartesian thought: art and science, history and science, prejudice and truth. This special issue of _boundary 2_ addresses current debates about the status of art in the context of global modernity. The range of arguments represented here cover a broad historical scope—from Cartesianism to present-day global modernity—of cultural discourse on the aesthetic to bring a focus to contemporary discussions of the corollary (...)
     
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  14.  15
    Essay-Review of Christian's 'Maps of Time: An Introduction to Big History'. [REVIEW]Robert J. O'Hara - 2006 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (1): 117–120.
    This well-written volume is an introduction, not to world history, but to the special genre of "Big History," as the subtitle indicates. Christian and his fellow big historians, reacting against popular scepticism toward "master narratives," seek to create a new class of grand works that incorporate not only the history of human society, but also of the Earth, its life, and the universe as a whole. Specialists in any of the fields covered by the volume may find rough spots in (...)
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  15. Moving Forward on the Problem of Consciousness.David Chalmers - 1997 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (1):3-46.
    This paper is a response to the 26 commentaries on my paper "Facing Up to the Problem of Consciousness". First, I respond to deflationary critiques, including those that argue that there is no "hard" problem of consciousness or that it can be accommodated within a materialist framework. Second, I respond to nonreductive critiques, including those that argue that the problems of consciousness are harder than I have suggested, or that my framework for addressing them is flawed. Third, I address positive (...)
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  16. Impartiality and Associative Duties: David O. Brink.David O. Brink - 2001 - Utilitas 13 (2):152-172.
    Consequentialism is often criticized for failing to accommodate impersonal constraints and personal options. A common consequentialist response is to acknowledge the anticonsequentialist intuitions but to argue either that the consequentialist can, after all, accommodate the allegedly recalcitrant intuitions or that, where accommodation is impossible, the recalcitrant intuition can be dismissed for want of an adequate philosophical rationale. Whereas these consequentialist responses have some plausibility, associational duties represent a somewhat different challenge to consequentialism, inasmuch as they embody neither impersonal constraints nor (...)
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  17. Eudaimonism, Love and Friendship, and Political Community*: DAVID O. BRINK.David O. Brink - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (1):252-289.
    It is common to regard love, friendship, and other associational ties to others as an important part of a happy or flourishing life. This would be easy enough to understand if we focused on friendships based on pleasure, or associations, such as business partnerships, predicated on mutual advantage. For then we could understand in a straightforward way how these interpersonal relationships would be valuable for someone involved in such relationships just insofar as they caused her pleasure or causally promoted her (...)
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  18.  84
    Common Sense and First Principles in Sidgwick's Methods*: DAVID O. BRINK.David O. Brink - 1994 - Social Philosophy and Policy 11 (1):179-201.
    What role, if any, should our moral intuitions play in moral epistemology? We make, or are prepared to make, moral judgments about a variety of actual and hypothetical situations. Some of these moral judgments are more informed, reflective, and stable than others ; some we make more confidently than others; and some, though not all, are judgments about which there is substantial consensus. What bearing do our moral judgments have on philosophical ethics and the search for first principles in ethics? (...)
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  19.  28
    Representations of the Natural System in the Nineteenth Century.Robert J. O'Hara - 1991 - Biology and Philosophy 6 (2): 255–274.
    "The Natural System" is the abstract notion of the order in living diversity. The richness and complexity of this notion is revealed by the diversity of representations of the Natural System drawn by ornithologists in the Nineteenth Century. These representations varied in overall form from stars, to circles, to maps, to evolutionary trees and cross-sections through trees. They differed in their depiction of affinity, analogy, continuity, directionality, symmetry, reticulation and branching, evolution, and morphological convergence and divergence. Some representations were two-dimensional, (...)
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  20.  17
    The contradictions of digital modernity.Kieron O’Hara - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (1):197-208.
    This paper explores the concept of digital modernity, the extension of narratives of modernity with the special affordances of digital networked technology. Digital modernity produces a new narrative which can be taken in many ways: to be descriptive of reality; a teleological account of an inexorable process; or a normative account of an ideal sociotechnical state. However, it is understood that narratives of digital modernity help shape reality via commercial and political decision-makers, and examples are given from the politics and (...)
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  21. Telling the Tree: Narrative Representation and the Study of Evolutionary History.Robert J. O'Hara - 1992 - Biology and Philosophy 7 (2): 135–160.
    Accounts of the evolutionary past have as much in common with works of narrative history as they do with works of science. Awareness of the narrative character of evolutionary writing leads to the discovery of a host of fascinating and hitherto unrecognized problems in the representation of evolutionary history, problems associated with the writing of narrative. These problems include selective attention, narrative perspective, foregrounding and backgrounding, differential resolution, and the establishment of a canon of important events. The narrative aspects of (...)
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  22. Mill’s Progressive Principles.David O. Brink - 2013 - Oxford University Press UK.
    David O. Brink offers a reconstruction and assessment of John Stuart Mill's contributions to the utilitarian and liberal traditions. Brink defends interpretations of key elements in Mill's moral and political thought, and shows how a perfectionist reading of his conception of happiness has a significant impact on other aspects of his philosophy.
     
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  23.  30
    A Cluster Randomized-Controlled Trial of the Impact of the Tools of the Mind Curriculum on Self-Regulation in Canadian Preschoolers.Tracy Solomon, Andre Plamondon, Arland O’Hara, Heather Finch, Geraldine Goco, Peter Chaban, Lorrie Huggins, Bruce Ferguson & Rosemary Tannock - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  24.  35
    The Art of Reading as a Way of Life: On Nietzsche's Truth.Daniel T. O'Hara - 2009 - Northwestern University Press.
    The art of reading as a way of life: an introduction to Nietzsche's truth -- Experiments in creative reading: the Cambridge Nietzsche -- Nietzsche's passion in The gay science: an experiment in creative reading -- Nietzsche's book for all and none: the singularity of Thus spoke Zarathustra -- Ecce homo: Nietzsche's two natures -- Nietzsche's critical vortex: on the global tragedy of theoretical man.
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  25.  29
    Moral Realism and the Foundations of Ethics.David O. BRINK - 1989 - Ethics 101 (3):610-624.
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  26. Fairness and the Architecture of Responsibility.David O. Brink & Dana K. Nelkin - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Agency and Responsibility 1:284-313.
    This essay explores a conception of responsibility at work in moral and criminal responsibility. Our conception draws on work in the compatibilist tradition that focuses on the choices of agents who are reasons-responsive and work in criminal jurisprudence that understands responsibility in terms of the choices of agents who have capacities for practical reason and whose situation affords them the fair opportunity to avoid wrongdoing. Our conception brings together the dimensions of normative competence and situational control, and we factor normative (...)
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  27.  28
    Homage to Clio, or, Toward an Historical Philosophy for Evolutionary Biology.Robert J. O'Hara - 1988 - Systematic Zoology 37 (2): 142–155.
    Discussions of the theory and practice of systematics and evolutionary biology have heretofore revolved around the views of philosophers of science. I reexamine these issues from the different perspective of the philosophy of history. Just as philosophers of history distinguish between chronicle (non-interpretive or non-explanatory writing) and narrative history (interpretive or explanatory writing), I distinguish between evolutionary chronicle (cladograms, broadly construed) and narrative evolutionary history. Systematics is the discipline which estimates the evolutionary chronicle. ¶ Explanations of the events described in (...)
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  28. Moral Realism and the Sceptical Arguments From Disagreement and Queerness.David O. Brink - 1984 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 62 (2):111 – 125.
  29.  80
    Making a Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue.David O. Brink - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (3):428-434.
    Recent moral philosophy has seen a revival of interest in the concept of virtue, and with it a reassessment of the role of virtue in the work of Aristotle and Kant. This book brings that reassessment to a new level of sophistication. Nancy Sherman argues that Kant preserves a notion of virtue in his moral theory that bears recognizable traces of the Aristotelian and Stoic traditions, and that his complex anthropology of morals brings him into surprising alliance with Aristotle. She (...)
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  30. Leadership, Ethics and Responsibility to the Other.David Knights & Majella O’Leary - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 67 (2):125-137.
    Of recent time, there has been a proliferation of concerns with ethical leadership within corporate business not least because of the numerous scandals at Enron, Worldcom, Parmalat, and two major Irish banks – Allied Irish Bank (AIB) and National Irish Bank (NIB). These have not only threatened the position of many senior corporate managers but also the financial survival of some of the companies over which they preside. Some authors have attributed these scandals to the pre-eminence of a focus on (...)
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  31. Externalist Moral Realism.David O. Brink - 1986 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 24 (S1):23-41.
    SOME THINK THAT MORAL REALISTS CANNOT RECOGNIZE THE PRACTICAL OR ACTION-GUIDING CHARACTER OF MORALITY AND SO REJECT MORAL REALISM. THIS FORM OF ANTI-REALISM DEPENDS UPON AN INTERNALIST MORAL PSYCHOLOGY. BUT AN EXTERNALIST MORAL PSYCHOLOGY IS MORE PLAUSIBLE AND ALLOWS THE REALIST A SENSIBLE EXPLANATION OF THE ACTION-GUIDING CHARACTER OF MORALITY. CONSIDERATION OF THE PRACTICAL CHARACTER OF MORALITY, THEREFORE, DOES NOT UNDERMINE AND, INDEED, SUPPORTS MORAL REALISM.
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  32. Moral Motivation.David O. Brink - 1997 - Ethics 108 (1):4-32.
  33.  21
    On Deconstruction: Theory and Criticism After StructuralismRoland Barthes.Dan O'Hara & Jonathan Culler - 1984 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 42 (3):323.
  34. Prudence and Authenticity: Intrapersonal Conflicts of Value.David O. Brink - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (2):215-245.
    Prudence and authenticity are sometimes seen as rival virtues. Prudence,as traditionally conceived, is temporally neutral. It attaches no intrinsic significance to the temporal location of benefits or harms within the agent’s life; the prudent agent should be equally concerned about all parts of her life. But people’s values and ideals often change over time, sometimes in predictable ways, as when middle age and parenthood often temporize youthful radicalism or spontaneity with concerns for comfort,security, and predictability. In situations involving diachronic, intrapersonal (...)
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  35.  21
    Population Thinking and Tree Thinking in Systematics.Robert J. O'Hara - 1997 - Zoologica Scripta 26 (4): 323–329.
    Two new modes of thinking have spread through systematics in the twentieth century. Both have deep historical roots, but they have been widely accepted only during this century. Population thinking overtook the field in the early part of the century, culminating in the full development of population systematics in the 1930s and 1940s, and the subsequent growth of the entire field of population biology. Population thinking rejects the idea that each species has a natural type (as the earlier essentialist view (...)
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  36. Human Social Evolution: A Comparison of Hunter-Gatherer and Chimpanzee Social Organization.Robert Layton & Sean O'Hara - 2010 - In Social Brain, Distributed Mind. pp. 83.
    This chapter compares the social behaviour of human hunter-gatherers with that of the better-studied chimpanzee species, Pan troglodytes, in an attempt to pinpoint the unique features of human social evolution. Although hunter-gatherers and chimpanzees living in central Africa have similar body weights, humans live at much lower population densities due to their greater dependence on predation. Human foraging parties have longer duration than those of chimpanzees, lasting hours rather than minutes, and a higher level of mutual dependence, through the division (...)
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  37. Prospects for Temporal Neutrality.David O. Brink - 2011 - In Craig Callender (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Time. Oxford University Press.
  38. Moral Conflict and its Structure.David O. Brink - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (2):215-247.
  39.  17
    Lifelogging: Privacy and Empowerment with Memories for Life. [REVIEW]Kieron O’Hara, Mischa M. Tuffield & Nigel Shadbolt - 2008 - Identity in the Information Society 1 (1):155-172.
    The growth of information acquisition, storage and retrieval capacity has led to the development of the practice of lifelogging, the undiscriminating collection of information concerning one’s life and behaviour. There are potential problems in this practice, but equally it could be empowering for the individual, and provide a new locus for the construction of an online identity. In this paper we look at the technological possibilities and constraints for lifelogging tools, and set out some of the most important privacy, identity (...)
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  40.  26
    Mapping the Space of Time: Temporal Representation in the Historical Sciences.Robert J. O'Hara - 1996 - Memoirs of the California Academy of Sciences 20: 7–17.
    William Whewell (1794–1866), polymathic Victorian scientist, philosopher, historian, and educator, was one of the great neologists of the nineteenth century. Although Whewell's name is little remembered today except by professional historians and philosophers of science, researchers in many scientific fields work each day in a world that Whewell named. "Miocene" and "Pliocene," "uniformitarian" and "catastrophist," "anode" and "cathode," even the word "scientist" itself—all of these were Whewell coinages. Whewell is particularly important to students of the historical sciences for another word (...)
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  41.  16
    The Technology of Collective Memory and the Normativity of Truth.Kieron O'Hara - unknown
    Neither our evolutionary past, nor our pre-literate culture, has prepared humanity for the use of technology to provide records of the past, records which in many context become normative for memory. The demand that memory be true, rather than useful or pleasurable, has changed our social and psychological under-standing of ourselves and our fellows. The current vogue for lifelogging, and the rapid proliferation of digital memory-supporting technologies, may accelerate this change, and create dilemmas for policymakers, designers and social thinkers.
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  42. Realism, Naturalism, and Moral Semantics.David O. Brink - 2001 - Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (2):154.
    The prospects for moral realism and ethical naturalism have been important parts of recent debates within metaethics. As a first approximation, moral realism is the claim that there are facts or truths about moral matters that are objective in the sense that they obtain independently of the moral beliefs or attitudes of appraisers. Ethical naturalism is the claim that moral properties of people, actions, and institutions are natural, rather than occult or supernatural, features of the world. Though these metaethical debates (...)
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  43. Situationism, Responsibility, and Fair Opportunity.David O. Brink - 2013 - Social Philosophy and Policy (1-2):121-149.
    The situationist literature in psychology claims that conduct is not determined by character and reflects the operation of the agent’s situation or environment. For instance, due to situational factors, compassionate behavior is much less common than we might have expected from people we believe to be compassionate. This article focuses on whether situationism should revise our beliefs about moral responsibility. It assesses situationism’s implications against the backdrop of a conception of responsibility that is grounded in norms about the fair opportunity (...)
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  44.  33
    The Nature and Significance of Culpability.David O. Brink - 2019 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 13 (2):347-373.
    Culpability is not a unitary concept within the criminal law, and it is important to distinguish different culpability concepts and the work they do. Narrow culpability is an ingredient in wrongdoing itself, describing the agent’s elemental mens rea. Broad culpability is the responsibility condition that makes wrongdoing blameworthy and without which wrongdoing is excused. Inclusive culpability is the combination of wrongdoing and responsibility or broad culpability that functions as the retributivist desert basis for punishment. Each of these kinds of culpability (...)
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  45.  99
    Some Forms and Limits of Consequentialism.David O. Brink - 2005 - In David Copp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory. Oup Usa.
    All forms of consequentialism make the moral assessment of alternatives depend in some way on the value of the alternatives, but they form a heterogeneous family of moral theories. Some employ subjective assumptions about value, while others employ objective assumptions. Some assess the value of alternatives directly, while others assess value indirectly. Some direct agents to maximize value, while others direct agents to satisfice. Some, such as utilitarianism, are impartial and concerned to promote agent-neutral value, while others, such as self-referential (...)
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  46.  25
    O'Connor's Paradox and the Teaching of Educational Philosophy.David Stenhouse & D. J. O'Connor - 1968 - British Journal of Educational Studies 16 (3):243 - 257.
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  47.  98
    The Significance of Desire.David O. Brink - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 3:5-45.
  48. Ethical Response to Climate Change.O'Hara Dennis Patrick & Abelsohn Alan - 2011 - Ethics and the Environment 16 (1):25-50.
    The same attitudes that allowed a significant increase in the anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations that are causing climate change are the same attitudes that are retarding an adequate ethical response to the impact that climate change is having on both human populations and the rest of the planet. The industrialized nations of the West paid little attention during the past three centuries to the impacts that their economies and cultures were having on the environment, both locally and globally. There (...)
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  49. Rational Egoism and the Separateness of Persons.David O. Brink - 1997 - In J. Dancy (ed.), Reading Parfit. Blackwell. pp. 96--134.
  50. Mill's Deliberative Utilitarianism.David O. Brink - 1992 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 21 (1):67-103.
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