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  1.  86
    The New International Health Regulations: An Historic Development for International Law and Public Health.David P. Fidler & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):85-94.
    The adoption of the new International Health Regulations in May 2005 represents an historic development for international law and public health. This article describes the IHR revision process and analyzes why the new IHR constitute an advance in global health governance.
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  2.  15
    The New International Health Regulations: An Historic Development for International Law and Public Health.David P. Fidler & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):85-94.
    The World Health Assembly adopted the new International Health Regulations on May 23, 2005. The new IHR represent the culmination of a decade-long revision process and an historic development for international law and public health. The new IHR appear at a moment when public health, security, and democracy have become intertwined, addressed at the highest levels of government. The United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan, for example, identified IHR revision as a priority for moving humanity toward “larger freedom.” This article analyzes (...)
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  3.  16
    Through the Quarantine Looking Glass: Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis and Public Health Governance, Law, and Ethics.David P. Fidler, Lawrence O. Gostin & Howard Markel - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):616-628.
    The incident in May-June 2007 involving a U.S. citizen traveling internationally while infected with drug-resistant tuberculosis involved the U.S. federal government's application of its quarantine and isolation powers. The incident and the isolation order raised numerous important issues for public health governance, law, and ethics. This article explores many of these issues by examining how the exercise of quarantine powers provides a powerful lens through which to understand how societies respond to and attempt to govern threats posed by dangerous, contagious (...)
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  4.  8
    Through the Quarantine Looking Glass: Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis and Public Health Governance, Law, and Ethics.David P. Fidler, Lawrence O. Gostin & Howard Markel - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):616-628.
    Dramatic events involving dangerous microbes often focus attention on isolation and quarantine as policy instruments. The incident in May-June 2007 involving Andrew Speaker and drug-resistant tuberculosis joins other communicable disease crises that have forced contemplation or actual application of quarantine powers. Implementation of quarantine powers, which encompasses authority for both isolation and quarantine actions, is important not only for the handling of a specific event but also because the use of such authority provides a window on broader issues of public (...)
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  5.  8
    A Globalized Theory of Public Health Law.David P. Fidler - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):150-161.
    This symposium issue of the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics indicates that interest in public health law in the United States is enjoying a renaissance. The focus of the articles reflects this renaissance, as they explore the state of public health law in various contexts within the United States. Additionally, all but one of the symposium authors plies his or her trade at a university, institution, or government agency in the United States. My task here is different: I focus (...)
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  6.  8
    A Globalized Theory of Public Health Law.David P. Fidler - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):150-161.
    This symposium issue of the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics indicates that interest in public health law in the United States is enjoying a renaissance. The focus of the articles reflects this renaissance, as they explore the state of public health law in various contexts within the United States. Additionally, all but one of the symposium authors plies his or her trade at a university, institution, or government agency in the United States. My task here is different: I focus (...)
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  7.  24
    The Meaning of Moscow:“Non-Lethal” Weapons and International Law in the Early 21st Century.David P. Fidler - forthcoming - Emergence: Complexity and Organization.
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  8.  10
    SARS: Political Pathology of the First Post-Westphalian Pathogen.David P. Fidler - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):485-505.
    In March 2003, the world discovered, again, that I humanity's battle with infectious diseases continues. The twenty-first century began with infectious diseases, especially HIV/AIDS, being discussed as threats to human rights, economic development, and national security. Bioterrorism in the United States in October 2001 increased concerns about pathogenic microbes. The global outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in the spring of 2003 kept the global infectious disease challenge at the forefront of world news for weeks. At its May 2003 annual (...)
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    SARS: Political Pathology of the First Post-Westphalian Pathogen.David P. Fidler - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):485-505.
    In March 2003, the world discovered, again, that I humanity's battle with infectious diseases continues. The twenty-first century began with infectious diseases, especially HIV/AIDS, being discussed as threats to human rights, economic development, and national security. Bioterrorism in the United States in October 2001 increased concerns about pathogenic microbes. The global outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in the spring of 2003 kept the global infectious disease challenge at the forefront of world news for weeks. At its May 2003 annual (...)
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