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David P. McCabe [8]David Paul Mccabe [1]
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David Paul McCabe
Colgate University
  1. Seeing is Believing: The Effect of Brain Images on Judgments of Scientific Reasoning.David P. McCabe & Alan D. Castel - 2008 - Cognition 107 (1):343-352.
  2.  34
    On the Validity of Remember–Know Judgments: Evidence From Think Aloud Protocols.David P. McCabe, Lisa Geraci, Jeffrey K. Boman, Amanda E. Sensenig & Matthew G. Rhodes - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1625-1633.
    The use of remember–know judgments to assess subjective experience associated with memory retrieval, or as measures of recollection and familiarity processes, has been controversial. In the current study we had participants think aloud during study and provide verbal reports at test for remember–know and confidence judgments. Results indicated that the vast majority of remember judgments for studied items were associated with recollection from study , but this correspondence was less likely for high-confidence judgments . Instead, high-confidence judgments were more likely (...)
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  3.  29
    On Interpreting the Relationship Between Remember–Know Judgments and Confidence: The Role of Instructions☆.Lisa Geraci, David P. McCabe & Jimmeka J. Guillory - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):701-709.
    Two experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that the nature of the remember–know instructions given to participants influences whether these responses reflect different memory states or different degrees of memory confidence. Participants studied words and nonwords, a variable that has been shown to dissociate confidence from remember–know judgments and were given a set of published remember–know instructions that either emphasized know judgments as highly confident or as less confident states of recognition. Experiment 1 replicated the standard finding showing that (...)
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  4.  35
    The Influence of Instructions and Terminology on the Accuracy of Remember–Know Judgments.David P. McCabe & Lisa D. Geraci - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):401-413.
    The remember–know paradigm is one of the most widely used procedures to examine the subjective experience associated with memory retrieval. We examined how the terminology and instructions used to describe the experiences of remembering and knowing affected remember–know judgments. In Experiment 1 we found that using neutral terms, i.e., Type A memory and Type B memory, to describe the experiences of remembering and knowing reduced remember false alarms for younger and older adults as compared to using the terms Remember and (...)
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  5. 10. Richard Joyce, The Myth of Morality Richard Joyce, The Myth of Morality (Pp. 182-184).Kevin A. Ameriks, Tad R. Brennan, Ann E. Cudd, Kirk A. Greer, Bart Gruzalski, David P. McCabe, John McCumber, Richard Sherlock & Ira J. Singer - 2003 - Ethics 114 (1).
     
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  6.  6
    [Book Review][the Tragedy of Liberalism]. [REVIEW]David P. McCabe - 2003 - Ethics 114 (1):209-210.
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  7.  37
    Book Notes. [REVIEW]Kevin A. Ameriks, Tad R. Brennan, Ann E. Cudd, Kirk A. Greer, Bart Gruzalski, David P. McCabe, John McCumber, Richard Sherlock & Ira J. Singer - 2003 - Ethics 114 (1):205-212.
  8.  11
    Recollection-Based Prospective Metamemory Judgments Are More Accurate Than Those Based on Confidence: Judgments of Remembering and Knowing.David P. McCabe & Nicholas C. Soderstrom - 2011 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 140 (4):605-621.
  9. The Virtues of State Neutrality: A Defense of Liberal Politics.David Paul Mccabe - 1995 - Dissertation, Northwestern University
    In this dissertation I put forth a defense of liberalism understood in terms of the principle of state neutrality. In the first half of the dissertation, I attempt to show that a commitment to state neutrality is a central element running through the liberal tradition. I argue for this by examining closely the liberal theories offered by Locke, Mill, Hobhouse, and Rawls. In the second part, I defend liberal neutrality against two prominent criticisms: first, that it is flawed because it (...)
     
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