105 found
Order:
Disambiguations
David Pears [82]David Francis Pears [13]David F. Pears [11]
  1. The False Prison: A Study of the Development of Wittgenstein's Philosophy.David Francis Pears - 1987 - Oxford University Press.
    In this volume, Pears examines the internal organization of Wittgenstein's thought and the origins of his philosophy to provide unusually clear insight into the philosopher's ideas. Part I surveys the whole of Wittgenstein's work, while Part II details the central concepts of his early system; both reveal how the details of Wittgenstein's work fit into its general pattern.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  2.  90
    Motivated Irrationality.David Francis Pears - 1984 - St. Augustine's Press.
    This book is about self-deception and lack of self-control or wishful thinking and acting against one's own better judgement. Steering a course between the skepticism of philosophers, who find the conscious defiance of reason too paradoxical, and the tolerant empiricism of psychologists, it compares the two kinds of irrationality, and relates the conclusions drawn to the views of Freud, cognitive psychologists, and such philosophers as Aristotle, Anscombe, Hare and Davidson.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  3.  31
    Paradox and Platitude in Wittgenstein's Philosophy.David Pears - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    This is a concise and readable study of five intertwined themes at the heart of Wittgenstein's thought, written by one of his most eminent interpreters. David Pears offers penetrating investigations and lucid explications of some of the most influential and yet puzzling writings of twentieth-century philosophy. He focuses on the idea of language as a picture of the world; the phenomenon of linguistic regularity; the famous "private language argument"; logical necessity; and ego and the self.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  4.  40
    Individuals.David Pears & P. F. Strawson - 1961 - Philosophical Quarterly 11 (44):262.
    Since its publication in 1959, Individuals has become a modern philosophical classic. Bold in scope and ambition, it continues to influence debates in metaphysics, philosophy of logic and language, and epistemology. Peter Strawson's most famous work, it sets out to describe nothing less than the basic subject matter of our thought. It contains Strawson's now famous argument for descriptive metaphysics and his repudiation of revisionary metaphysics, in which reality is something beyond the world of appearances. Throughout, Individuals advances some highly (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   63 citations  
  5. Paradox and Platitude in Wittgenstein's Philosophy.David Pears - 2007 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (3):609-609.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  6. The False Prison: Volume Two.David Pears - 1988 - Clarendon Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  7.  23
    The Appropiate Causation of Intentional Basic Actions.David Pears - 1975 - Critica 7 (20):39-72.
  8. Self-Deceptive Belief-Formation.David F. Pears - 1991 - Synthese 89 (3):393-405.
  9. The Paradoxes of Self-Deception.David F. Pears - 1974 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 1:7-24.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. The Relation Between Wittgenstein's Picture Theory of Propositions and Russell's Theories of Judgment.David Pears - 1977 - Philosophical Review 86 (2):177-196.
  11. The False Prison Vol. One.David Pears - 1987 - Clarendon Press.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  12. Wittgenstein.David Francis Pears - 1971 - London: Fontana.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein was born in Vienna in 1889 and died in Cambridge in 1951. He studied engineering, first in Berlin and then in Manchester, and he soon began to ask himself philosophical questions about the foundations of mathematics. What are numbers? What sort of truth does a mathematical equation possess? What is the force of proof in pure mathematics? In order to find the answers to such questions, he went to Cambridge in 1911 to work with Russell, who had just (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  13.  56
    Hume's System: An Examination of the First Book of His Treatise.David Pears - 1990 - Oxford University Press.
    In this compelling analysis David Pears examines the foundations of Hume's theory of the mind as presented in the first book of the Treatise. Past studies have tended to take one of two extreme views: that Hume relies exclusively on a theory of meaning, or that he relies exclusively on a theory of truth and evidence. Steering a middle course between these positions, Pears argues that Hume's theory of ideas serves both functions. He examines in detail its application to three (...)
  14.  11
    Nothing is Hidden: Wittgenstein's Criticism of His Early Thought.David Pears & Norman Malcolm - 1989 - Philosophical Review 98 (3):379.
  15. The Causal Conditions of Perception.David F. Pears - 1976 - Synthese 33 (June):25-40.
  16. Hume’s Recantation of His Theory of Personal Identity.David Pears - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):257-264.
    I am going to defend a diagnosis of Hume’s recantation that I have already defended—rather unsuccessfully—in more than one publication. My excuse for trying again is that I shall now offer a more carefully qualified defense. My diagnosis was, and still is, that in the Appendix to the Treatise Hume came to see that he could not account for the necessary ownership of perceptions —i.e., for the fact that this very perception could not have occurred in a different set.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  51
    Wittgensteinian Themes: Essays in Honour of David Pears.David Francis Pears, David Charles & William Child (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    A stellar group of philosophers offer new works on themes from the great philosophy of Wittgenstein, honoring one of his most eminent interpreters David Pears. This collection covers both the early and the later work of Wittgenstein, relating it to current debates in philosophy. Topics discussed include solipsism, ostension, rules, necessity, privacy, and consciousness.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  18. The Anatomy of Courage.David Pears - 2004 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 71 (1):1-12.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19. Professor Norman Malcolm: Dreaming.David F. Pears - 1961 - Mind 70 (April):145-163.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Questions In The Philosophy Of Mind.David F. Pears - 1975 - London: : Duckworth.
  21.  2
    The False Prison: A Study of the Development of Wittgenstein's Philosophy.David Pears - 1991 - Noûs 25 (3):377-380.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  22. Bertrand Russell and the British Tradition in Philosophy.David Francis Pears - 1967 - London: Fontana.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  23. Courage as a Mean.David Pears - 1980 - In Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), Essays on Aristotle's Ethics. University of California Press. pp. 171--187.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  24.  78
    Wittgenstein’s Naturalism.David Pears - 1995 - The Monist 78 (4):411-424.
    There are several kinds of philosophical naturalism and one of their leading ideas is that the right method in philosophy is not to theorize about things but to describe them as we find them in daily life. Wittgenstein’s later philosophy is evidently a naturalism inspired by this idea. However, that is an observation which leaves much unexplained. It is a simple key which unlocks the first door only to reveal others behind it that remain closed.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25.  6
    Ludwig Wittgenstein.David Francis Pears - 1970 - Harvard University Press.
  26.  63
    The Function of Acquaintance in Russell's Philosophy.David Pears - 1981 - Synthese 46 (2):149 - 166.
  27. The False Prison: A Study of the Development of Wittgenstein's Philosophy.David Pears - 1989 - Mind 98 (389):160-165.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  28.  6
    Hume's System: An Examination of the First Book of His Treatise.David Pears - 1994 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (2):475-479.
  29. Bertrand Russell.David Francis Pears (ed.) - 1972 - Garden City, N.Y., Anchor Books.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  30. Motivated Irrationality.David Pears - 1985 - Philosophy 60 (232):274-275.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  31.  5
    Ludwig Wittgenstein.David Pears - 1972 - Journal of Philosophy 69 (1):16-26.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  32.  69
    Hypotheticals.David Pears - 1949 - Analysis 10 (3):49 - 63.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  33.  56
    How Easy is Akrasia?David Pears - 1982 - Philosophia 11 (1-2):33-50.
  34. The False Prison: A Study of the Development of Wittgenstein's Philosophy. Volume 2.David Pears - 1988 - Oxford University Press UK.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  35.  8
    Wittgenstein’s Naturalism.David Pears - 1995 - The Monist 78 (4):411-424.
    There are several kinds of philosophical naturalism and one of their leading ideas is that the right method in philosophy is not to theorize about things but to describe them as we find them in daily life. Wittgenstein’s later philosophy is evidently a naturalism inspired by this idea. However, that is an observation which leaves much unexplained. It is a simple key which unlocks the first door only to reveal others behind it that remain closed.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36.  48
    Hume on Personal Identity.David Pears - 1993 - Hume Studies 19 (2):289-299.
  37. Hume's system. An examination of the First Book of his Treatise.David Pears - 1992 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 182 (1):82-88.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  38.  46
    The Originality of Wittgenstein's Investigation of Solipsism.David Pears - 1996 - European Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):124-137.
  39.  18
    Motivated Irrationality. [REVIEW]Jonathan Pressler & David Pears - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (2):264.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Logic And Language.David F. Pears - 1951 - Oxford,: Blackwell.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  41.  79
    Wittgenstein's Account of Rule-Following.David Pears - 1991 - Synthese 87 (2):273 - 283.
  42. Hume's System: An Examination of the First Book of His Treatise.David Pears - 1991 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In this book, Professor Pears examines the foundations of Hume's system as laid down in the first book of his Treatise, where his ideas are oresebted in their first fresh and undiluted form. The author steers a middle course between the two extreme views adopted in recent writings on Hume: that he relies exclusively on a theory of meaning, or that he relies exclusively on a theory of truth and evidence. Professor Pears argues that Hume's theory of ideas serves both (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43.  80
    The Incongruity of Counterparts.David Pears - 1952 - Mind 61 (241):78-81.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  14
    The Ego and the Eye: Wittgenstein’s Use of an Analogy.David Pears - 1993 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 44 (1):59-68.
    Wittgenstein's critique of sohpsism - his attempt to show that sohpsism loses its intended meaning on the way to achieving its aspired truth - is reconstructed from its erarly stages in the Notebooks 1914-1916 via the 1936 lecture notes to the passages in the Philosophical Investigations. The analogy of the geometrical eye and the pointing to it are used to show the connections between the different arguments here involved.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45.  46
    Universals.David Pears - 1951 - Philosophical Quarterly 1 (3):218-227.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46.  4
    Hume's System: An Examination of the First Book of His Treatise.A Progress of Sentiments: Reflections on Hume's Treatise.David Pears & Annette C. Baier - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (4):755-762.
  47.  85
    Synthetic Necessary Truth.David Pears - 1950 - Mind 59 (234):199-208.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  1
    The Ego and the Eye: Wittgenstein’s Use of an Analogy.David Pears - 1993 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 44 (1):59-68.
    Wittgenstein's critique of sohpsism - his attempt to show that sohpsism loses its intended meaning on the way to achieving its aspired truth - is reconstructed from its erarly stages in the Notebooks 1914-1916 via the 1936 lecture notes to the passages in the Philosophical Investigations. The analogy of the geometrical eye and the pointing to it are used to show the connections between the different arguments here involved.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49. Motivated Irrationality, Freudian Theory and Cognitive Dissonance.David Pears - 1982 - In Richard Wollheim & James Hopkins (eds.), Philosophical Essays on Freud. Cambridge University Press. pp. 264--288.
  50.  5
    Wittgenstein's Holism.David Pears - 1990 - Dialectica 44 (1‐2):165-173.
1 — 50 / 105