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  1.  16
    The Moral Limits of the Market: Science Commercialization and Religious Traditions.Jared L. Peifer, David R. Johnson & Elaine Howard Ecklund - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (1):183-197.
    Entrepreneurs of contested commodities often face stakeholders engaged in market excluding boundary work driven by ethical considerations. For example, the conversion of academic scientific knowledge into technologies that can be owned and sold is a growing global trend and key stakeholders have different ethical responses to this contested commodity. Commercialization of science can be viewed as a good thing because people believe it bolsters economic growth and broadly benefits society. Others view it as bad because they believe it discourages basic (...)
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  2.  18
    Ethical Ambiguity in Science.David R. Johnson & Elaine Howard Ecklund - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (4):989-1005.
    Drawing on 171 in-depth interviews with physicists at universities in the United States and the UK, this study examines the narratives of 48 physicists to explain the concept of ethical ambiguity: the border where legitimate and illegitimate conduct is blurred. Researchers generally assume that scientists agree on what constitutes both egregious and more routine forms of misconduct in science. The results of this study show that scientists perceive many scenarios as ethically gray, rather than black and white. Three orientations to (...)
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  3.  8
    Is the Market Perceived to be Civilizing or Destructive? Scientists’ Universalism Values and Their Attitudes Towards Patents.Jared L. Peifer, David R. Johnson & Elaine Howard Ecklund - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (2):253-267.
    Is the market civilizing or destructive? The increased salience of science commercialization is forcing scientists to address this question. Benefiting from the sociology of morality literature’s increased attention to specific kinds of morality and engaging with economic sociology’s moral markets literature, we generate competing hypotheses about scientists’ value-driven attitudes toward patenting. The Civilizing Market thesis suggests scientists who prioritize universalism will tend to support patenting. The Destructive Market thesis, by contrast, suggests universalism will be correlated with opposition to patenting. We (...)
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  4.  8
    Impaired Fertility and Perceived Difficulties Conceiving in Ghana: Measurement Problems and Prospects.Jasmine Fledderjohann & David R. Johnson - 2016 - Journal of Biosocial Science 48 (4):431-456.
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  5. A Differential Association Theory of Socialization to Commercialist Career Paths in Science.David R. Johnson - 2020 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 45 (3):381-404.
    Drawing on sixty-one in-depth interviews conducted with commercial and noncommercial scientists at four universities in the United States, this paper examines why academic scientists embrace commercially oriented career paths in higher education. A central goal of this paper is to expand our descriptive and conceptual understanding of socialization in the academic profession by examining the explanatory power of differential association theory. Differential association theory emphasizes how patterns of behavior are learned through a process of interaction with different types of individuals (...)
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  6. Technological Change and Professional Control in the Professoriate.David R. Johnson - 2013 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 38 (1):126-149.
    Scholarship on technological change in academe suggests that the adoption of instructional technologies will erode professional control. Researchers have documented the pervasiveness of new technologies, but neither demonstrate how technological change is experienced by faculty nor collect data that permit assessment of consequences for professional control. Drawing on a sample of interviews with forty-two professors at three research-intensive universities, this research makes two contributions to existing research. First, in contrast to existing depictions of technological change in higher education, the findings (...)
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