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David Wÿss Rudge [21]David Rudge [9]David W. Rudge [2]DavidWÿss Rudge [1]
  1.  1
    An Explicit and Reflective Approach to the Use of History to Promote Understanding of the Nature of Science.David W. Rudge & Eric M. Howe - 2009 - Science & Education 18 (5):561-580.
  2.  5
    Essay Review: Recent Introductory Philosophy of Biology Texts. [REVIEW]David Wÿss Rudge - 2000 - Journal of the History of Biology 33 (1):181-187.
  3.  2
    Changes Observed in Views of Nature of Science During a Historically Based Unit.David Wÿss Rudge, David Paul Cassidy, Janice Marie Fulford & Eric Michael Howe - 2014 - Science & Education 23 (9):1879-1909.
  4.  7
    Emphasizing the History of Genetics in an Explicit and Reflective Approach to Teaching the Nature of Science.Cody Tyler Williams & David Wÿss Rudge - 2016 - Science & Education 25 (3-4):407-427.
    Science education researchers have long advocated the central role of the nature of science for our understanding of scientific literacy. NOS is often interpreted narrowly to refer to a host of epistemological issues associated with the process of science and the limitations of scientific knowledge. Despite its importance, practitioners and researchers alike acknowledge that students have difficulty learning NOS and that this in part reflects how difficult it is to teach. One particularly promising method for teaching NOS involves an explicit (...)
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  5.  19
    Recapitulating the History of Sickle-Cell Anemia Research.Eric Michael Howe & David Wÿss Rudge - 2005 - Science & Education 14 (3-5):423-441.
    This paper provides an argument in favor of a specific pedagogical method of using the history of science to help students develop more informed views about nature of science (NOS) issues. The paper describes a series of lesson plans devoted to encouraging students to engage, unbeknownst to them, in similar reasoning that led scientists to understand sickle-cell anemia from the perspective of multiple subdisciplines in biology. Students pursue their understanding of a ‘mystery disease’ by means of a series of open-ended (...)
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  6.  12
    Taking the Peppered Moth with a Grain of Salt.David Wÿss Rudge - 1999 - Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):9-37.
    H. B. D. Kettlewell's (1955, 1956) classic field experiments on industrial melanism in polluted and unpolluted settings using the peppered moth, Biston betularia, are routinely cited as establishing that the melanic (dark) form of the moth rose in frequency downwind of industrial centers because of the cryptic advantage dark coloration provides against visual predators in soot-darkened environments. This paper critiques three common myths surrounding these investigations: (1) that Kettlewell used a model that identified crypsis as the only selective force responsible (...)
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  7.  27
    Kettlewell From an Error Statisticians's Point of View.David Wÿss Rudge - 2001 - Perspectives on Science 9 (1):59-77.
    : Bayesians and error statisticians have relied heavily upon examples from physics in developing their accounts of scientific inference. The present essay demonstrates it is possible to analyze H.B.D. Kettlewell's classic study of natural selection from Deborah Mayo's error statistical point of view (Mayo 1996). A comparison with a previous analysis of this episode from a Bayesian perspective (Rudge 1998) reveals that the error statistical account makes better sense of investigations such as Kettlewell's because it clarifies how core elements in (...)
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  8.  17
    A Bayesian Analysis of Strategies in Evolutionary Biology.David Wÿss Rudge - 1998 - Perspectives on Science 6 (4):341-360.
    : Most work done in philosophy of experiment has focused on experiments taken from the domain of physics. The present essay tests whether Allan Franklin's (1984, 1986, 1989, 1990) philosophy of experiment developed in the context of high energy physics can be extended to include examples from evolutionary biology, such as H. B. D. Kettlewell's (1955, 1956, 1958) famous studies of industrial melanism in the peppered moth, Biston betularia. The analysis demonstrates that many of the techniques used by evolutionary biologists (...)
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  9.  34
    H.B.D. Kettlewell's Research 1937-1953: The Influence of E.B. Ford, E.A. Cockayne and P.M. Sheppard.David Wÿss Rudge - 2006 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 28 (3):359 - 387.
    H.B.D. Kettlewell is best known for his pioneering work on the phenomenon of industrial melanism, which began shortly after his appointment in 1951 as a Nuffield Foundation research worker in E.B. Ford's newly formed sub-department of genetics at the University of Oxford. In the years since, a legend has formed around these investigations, one that portrays them as a success story of the 'Oxford School of Ecological Genetics', emphasizes Ford's intellectual contribution, and minimizes reference to assistance provided by others. The (...)
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  10.  5
    The Portrayal of Industrial Melanism in American College General Biology Textbooks.Janice Marie Fulford & David Wÿss Rudge - 2016 - Science & Education 25 (5-6):547-574.
    The phenomenon of industrial melanism became widely acknowledged as a well-documented example of natural selection largely as a result of H.B.D. Kettlewell’s pioneering research on the subject in the early 1950s. It was quickly picked up by American biology textbooks starting in the early 1960s and became ubiquitous throughout the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. While recent research on the phenomenon broadly supports Kettlewell’s explanation of IM in the peppered moth, which in turn has strengthened this example of natural selection, textbook (...)
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  11.  3
    The Role of Photographs and Films in Kettlewell's Popularizations of the Phenomenon of Industrial Melanism.David Wÿss Rudge - 2003 - Science & Education 12 (3):261-287.
  12. Introductory Readings in the Philosophy of Science.E. D. Klemke, Robert Hollinger, David Wÿss Rudge & A. David Kline (eds.) - 1998 - Prometheus Books.
  13.  23
    Taking the Peppered Moth with a Grain of Salt.DavidWÿss Rudge - 1999 - Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):9-37.
    H. B. D. Kettlewell's (1955, 1956) classic field experiments on industrial melanism in polluted and unpolluted settings using the peppered moth, Biston betularia, are routinely cited as establishing that the melanic (dark) form of the moth rose in frequency downwind of industrial centers because of the cryptic advantage dark coloration provides against visual predators in soot-darkened environments. This paper critiques three common myths surrounding these investigations: (1) that Kettlewell used a model that identified crypsis as the only selective force responsible (...)
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  14. A Philosophical Analysis of the Role of Selection Experiments in Evolutionary Biology.David Wyss Rudge - 1996 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    My dissertation philosophically analyzes experiments in evolutionary biology, an area of science where experimental approaches have tended to supplement, rather than supercede more traditional approaches, such as field observations. I conduct the analysis on the basis of three case studies of famous episodes in the history of selection experiments: H. B. D. Kettlewell's investigations of industrial melanism in the Peppered Moth, Biston betularia; two of Th. Dobzhansky's studies of adaptive radiation in the fruit fly, Drosophila pseudoobscura; and M. Wade's studies (...)
     
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  15.  16
    Tut-Tut Tutt, Not so Fast: Did Kettlewell Really Test Tutt's Explanation of Industrial Melanism?David Wÿss Rudge - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (4).
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  16.  14
    The Complementary Roles of Observation and Experiment: Theodosius Dobzhansky's Genetics of Natural Populations IX and XII.David Wÿss Rudge - 2000 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 22 (2):167 - 186.
    Theodosius Dobzhansky has long been recognized by historians as a pioneer in the combining of the 'field natural history' and 'laboratory experimentalist' traditions in biology (Allen 1994). The following essay analyzes two papers in his wellknown Genetics of Natural Populations series, GNP IX and GNP XII, which demonstrate how Dobzhansky combined field and laboratory work in the pursuit of an evolutionary question. The analysis reveals the multiple and complementary roles field observations and experiments played in his investigations. But it also (...)
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  17.  5
    Effects of Historical Story Telling on Student Understanding of Nature of Science.Cody Tyler Williams & David Wÿss Rudge - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (9-10):1105-1133.
    Concepts related to the nature of science have been considered an important part of scientific literacy as reflected in its inclusion in curriculum documents. A significant amount of science education research has focused on improving learners’ understanding of NOS. One approach that has often been advocated is an explicit and reflective approach. Some researchers have used the history of science to provide learners with explicit and reflective experiences with NOS concepts. Previous research on using the history of science in science (...)
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  18.  22
    Do Unknown Risks Preclude Informed Consent?David Rudge - 2003 - Essays in Philosophy 4 (2):5.
    Allen Buchanan and Daniel Brock, in a widely influential account, Deciding for Others , advocate a sliding scale approach to the determination of whether a patient is competent to make a decision regarding his/her health care. An analysis of two critiques of their position , Wicclair ) reveals a tacit presumption by all of these authors that the greater cognitive challenge often posed by high risk therapies constitutes grounds for an elevated standard of competence. This presumption cannot be consistently maintained (...)
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  19.  12
    David Wÿss Rudge, Review of The Evolution Wars: A Guide to the Debates by Michael Ruse. [REVIEW]David Wyss Rudge - 2001 - Philosophy of Science 68 (2):270-272.
  20.  12
    Unto Others: The Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior. Elliott Sober, David Sloan Wilson.David Wÿss Rudge - 2001 - Isis 92 (2):379-380.
  21.  7
    Nancy Anderson and Michael R. Dietrich The Educated Eye: Visual Culture and Pedagogy in the Life Sciences. Hanover: Dartmouth College Press, 2012. Pp. Viii+318. ISBN 978-1-61168-044-7. $39.95. [REVIEW]David Rudge - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Science 46 (4):734-735.
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  22.  4
    Darwin and Darwinism: An Introduction.David W. Rudge & Kostas Kampourakis - 2010 - Science & Education 19 (4-5):319-321.
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  23. Robert M. Martin, Scientific Thinking Reviewed By.David Wÿss Rudge - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17 (5):350-352.
     
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  24.  5
    Richard Creath; and Jane Maienschein . Biology and Epistemology. Xviii + 295 Pp., Illus., Apps., Bibls. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. $54.95 ; $19.95. [REVIEW]David Wÿss Rudge - 2003 - Isis 94 (3):510-511.
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  25.  4
    Ernst Mayr. What Makes Biology Unique? Considerations on the Autonomy of a Scientific Discipline. Xiv + 232 Pp., Illus., Index. Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. $30. [REVIEW]David Wÿss Rudge - 2005 - Isis 96 (3):469-470.
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  26.  4
    Review: Recent Introductory Philosophy of Biology Texts. [REVIEW]David Wÿss Rudge - 2000 - Journal of the History of Biology 33 (1):181 - 187.
  27. Robert M. Martin, Scientific Thinking. [REVIEW]David Rudge - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17:350-352.
     
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  28. Special Issue: Darwin and Darwinism. Part One: Historical, Philosophical and Cultural Studies.David Rudge & Kostas Kampourakis (eds.) - 2010 - Springer (Science & Education).
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  29. Special Issue: Darwin and Darwinism. Part Two: Pedagogical Studies.David Rudge & Kostas Kampourakis (eds.) - 2010 - Springer (Science & Education).
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