43 found
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  1.  21
    An Appraisal-Driven Componential Approach to the Emotional Brain.David Sander, Didier Grandjean & Klaus R. Scherer - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (3):219-231.
    This article suggests that methodological and conceptual advancements in affective sciences militate in favor of adopting an appraisal-driven componential approach to further investigate the emotional brain. Here we propose to operationalize this approach by distinguishing five functional networks of the emotional brain: the elicitation network, the expression network, the autonomic reaction network, the action tendency network, and the feeling network, and discuss these networks in the context of the affective neuroscience literature. We also propose that further investigating the “appraising brain” (...)
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  2.  25
    The Perception and Categorisation of Emotional Stimuli: A Review.Tobias Brosch, Gilles Pourtois & David Sander - 2010 - Cognition and Emotion 24 (3):377-400.
  3.  14
    Brain Networks, Emotion Components, and Appraised Relevance.David Sander, Didier Grandjean & Klaus R. Scherer - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (3):238-241.
    Modeling emotion processes remains a conceptual and methodological challenge in affective sciences. In responding to the other target articles in this special section on “Emotion and the Brain” and the comments on our article, we address the issue of potentially separate brain networks subserving the functions of the different emotion components. In particular, we discuss the suggested role of component synchronization in producing information integration for the dynamic emergence of a coherent emotion process, as well as the links between incentive (...)
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  4.  12
    Relevance and Emotion.Tim Wharton, Constant Bonard, Daniel Dukes, David Sander & Steve Oswald - 2021 - Journal of Pragmatics 181.
    The ability to focus on relevant information is central to human cognition. It is therefore hardly unsurprising that the notion of relevance appears across a range of different dis- ciplines. As well as its central role in relevance-theoretic pragmatics, for example, rele- vance is also a core concept in the affective sciences, where there is consensus that for a particular object or event to elicit an emotional state, that object or event needs to be relevant to the person in whom (...)
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  5. Oxford Companion to Emotion and the Affective Sciences.David Sander & Klaus Scherer (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Comprehensive, authoritative, up-to-date, and easy-to-use, The Oxford Companion to Emotion and the Affective Sciences is an indispensable resource for all who wish to find out about theories, concepts, methods, and research findings in this rapidly growing interdisciplinary field.
     
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  6.  21
    Comment: The Appraising Brain: Towards a Neuro-Cognitive Model of Appraisal Processes in Emotion.Tobias Brosch & David Sander - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):163-168.
    Appraisal theories have described elaborate mechanisms underlying the elicitation of emotion at the psychological-cognitive level, but typically do not integrate neuroscientific concepts and findings. At the same time, theoretical developments in appraisal theory have been pretty much ignored by researchers studying the neuroscience of emotion. We feel that a stronger integration of these two literatures would be highly profitable for both sides. Here we outline a blueprint of the “appraising brain.” To this end, we review neuroimaging research investigating the processing (...)
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  7.  13
    Conscious Emotional Experience Emerges as a Function of Multilevel, Appraisal-Driven Response Synchronization.Didier Grandjean, David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (2):484-495.
    In this paper we discuss the issue of the processes potentially underlying the emergence of emotional consciousness in the light of theoretical considerations and empirical evidence. First, we argue that componential emotion models, and specifically the Component Process Model , may be better able to account for the emergence of feelings than basic emotion or dimensional models. Second, we advance the hypothesis that consciousness of emotional reactions emerges when lower levels of processing are not sufficient to cope with the event (...)
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  8.  5
    Automatic Integration of Social Information in Emotion Recognition.Christian Mumenthaler & David Sander - 2015 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 144 (2):392-399.
  9.  16
    Oxford Companion to Emotion & the Affective Sciences.David Sander & Klaus Scherer (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Comprehensive, authoritative, up-to-date, & easy-to-use, this companion is an indispensable resource for all who wish to find out about theories, concepts, ...
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  10.  90
    The Oxford Companion to Emotion and the Affective Sciences.David Sander & Klaus Scherer (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Comprehensive, authoritative, up-to-date, & easy-to-use, this companion is an indispensable resource for all who wish to find out about theories, concepts, ...
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  11. Introduction: Moral Emotions.Florian Cova, Julien Deonna & David Sander - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):397-400.
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  12.  3
    Comment: Collective Epistemic Emotions and Individualized Learning: A Relational Account.David Sander - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (4):230-232.
    This comment considers some potential implications of both the appraisal approaches and the framework proposed by Mascolo in regard to a mechanism that is particularly important for development: le...
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  13.  44
    Enhanced Pavlovian Aversive Conditioning to Positive Emotional Stimuli.Yoann Stussi, Gilles Pourtois & David Sander - 2018 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 147 (6):905-923.
  14.  7
    The Mere Exposure Effect Depends on an Odor’s Initial Pleasantness.Sylvain Delplanque, Géraldine Coppin, Laurène Bloesch, Isabelle Cayeux & David Sander - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  15.  17
    Where is the Chocolate? Rapid Spatial Orienting Toward Stimuli Associated with Primary Rewards.Eva Pool, Tobias Brosch, Sylvain Delplanque & David Sander - 2014 - Cognition 130 (3):348-359.
  16.  3
    Handbook of Value: Perspectives From Economics, Neuroscience, Philosophy, Psychology and Sociolog.Tobias Brosch & David Sander (eds.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    The Handbook of Value combines the forces of the many disciplines involved in value research, by integrating the perspectives of distinguished scholars from the different disciplines. Contributions cover conceptual issues such as definitions of value, psychological and neurological mechanisms underlying value computation and representation, types and taxonomies of value, interindividual and intercultural value differences, the role of value in emotion, moral judgment, decision-making and behavior, as well as case studies of individual varieties of value. The volume contributes to an interdisciplinary (...)
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  17.  25
    Behold the Voice of Wrath: Cross-Modal Modulation of Visual Attention by Anger Prosody.Tobias Brosch, Didier Grandjean, David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer - 2008 - Cognition 106 (3):1497-1503.
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  18.  55
    The Tangled Web of Agency.Alain Daniel Pe-Curto, Julien Deonna & David Sander - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
    We characterize Doris's anti-reflectivist, collaborativist, valuational theory along two dimensions. The first dimension is socialentanglement, according to which cognition, agency, and selves are socially embedded. The second dimension isdisentanglement, the valuational element of the theory that licenses the anchoring of agency and responsibility in distinct actors. We then present an issue for the account: theproblem of bad company.
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  19.  11
    Emotional Memory: From Affective Relevance to Arousal.Alison Montagrin & David Sander - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  20.  39
    The Role of the Amygdala in the Appraising Brain.David Sander, Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):161.
    Lindquist et al. convincingly argue that the brain implements psychological operations that are constitutive of emotion rather than modules subserving discrete emotions. However, the nature of such psychological operations is open to debate. I argue that considering appraisal theories may provide alternative interpretations of the neuroimaging data with respect to the psychological operations involved.
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  21.  9
    The Perception of Changing Emotion Expressions.Vera Sacharin, David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (7):1273-1300.
  22.  26
    Emotion Meets Action: Towards an Integration of Research and Theory.Bernhard Hommel, Agnes Moors, David Sander & Julien Deonna - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (4):295-298.
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  23.  11
    Handbook of Value: Perspectives From Economics, Neuroscience, Philosophy, Psychology and Sociolog.Tobias Brosch & David Sander (eds.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The Handbook of Value combines the forces of the many disciplines involved in value research, by integrating the perspectives of distinguished scholars from the different disciplines. Contributions cover conceptual issues such as definitions of value, psychological and neurological mechanisms underlying value computation and representation, types and taxonomies of value, interindividual and intercultural value differences, the role of value in emotion, moral judgment, decision-making and behavior, as well as case studies of individual varieties of value. The volume contributes to an interdisciplinary (...)
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  24.  22
    How to Map the Affective Semantic Space of Scents.Sylvain Delplanque, Christelle Chrea, Didier Grandjean, Camille Ferdenzi, Isabelle Cayeux, Christelle Porcherot, Bénédicte Le Calvé, David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (5):885-898.
  25.  9
    Emotional Expression and Vocabulary Learning in Adults and Children.Fabrice Clément, Stéphane Bernard, Didier Grandjean & David Sander - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (3):539-548.
  26.  52
    Basic Tastes and Basic Emotions: Basic Problems and Perspectives for a Nonbasic Solution.David Sander - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):88-88.
    Contemporary behavioral and brain scientists consider the existence of so-called basic emotions in a similar way to the one described by Erickson for so-called basic tastes. Commenting on this analogy, I argue that similar basic problems are encountered in both perspectives, and I suggest a potential nonbasic solution that is tested in emotion research (i.e., the appraisal model of emotion).
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  27.  68
    The Emotional Shape of Our Moral Life: Anger-Related Emotions and Mutualistic Anthropology.Florian Cova, Julien Deonna & David Sander - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):86 - 87.
    The evolutionary hypothesis advanced by Baumard et al. makes precise predictions on which emotions should play the main role in our moral lives: morality should be more closely linked to emotions (like contempt and disgust) than to emotions (like anger). Here, we argue that these predictions run contrary to most psychological evidence.
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  28.  37
    Feeling the Future: Prospects for a Theory of Implicit Prospection.Philip Gerrans & David Sander - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (5):699-710.
    Mental time travel refers to the ability of an organism to project herself backward and forward in time, using episodic memory and imagination to simulate past and future experiences. The evolution of mental time travel gives humans a unique capacity for prospection: the ability to pre-experience the future. Discussions of mental time travel treat it as an instance of explicit prospection. We argue that implicit simulations of past and future experience can also be used as a way of gaining information (...)
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  29.  33
    Amalgams and the Power of Analytical Chemistry: Affective Science Needs to Decompose the Appraisal-Emotion Interaction.David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):216-217.
    The issues addressed in this commentary include: (1) the appropriate conceptualization of “appraisal”; (2) the nature and unfolding of emotional episodes over time; (3) the interrelationships between the dynamic elements of the appraisal process and their effects on other emotion components, as well as repercussions on ongoing appraisal in a recursive process; and (4) the use of brain research to constrain and inform models of emotion.
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  30.  13
    Functional Neuroimaging of Human Vocalizations and Affective Speech.Sascha Frühholz, David Sander & Didier Grandjean - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (6):554-555.
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  31.  22
    How Does Perceiving Eye Direction Modulate Emotion Recognition?Laurence Conty, Julie Grèzes & David Sander - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):443-444.
    Niedenthal et al. postulate that eye contact with the expresser of an emotion automatically initiates embodied simulation. Our commentary explores the generality of such an eye contact effect for emotions other than happiness. Based on the appraisal theory of emotion, we propose that embodied simulation may be reinforced by mutual or averted gaze as a function of emotional context.
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  32. The Value Handbook: The Affective Sciences of Values and Valuation.Tobias Brosch & David Sander (eds.) - forthcoming
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  33.  9
    Emotions in Attacker-Defender Conflicts.Patricia Cernadas Curotto, Eran Halperin, David Sander & Olga Klimecki - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    The distinction between attackers and defenders might help refine the understanding of the role of emotions in conflicts. Here, we briefly discuss differences between attackers and defenders in terms of appraisals, action tendencies, emotional preferences, and brain activities. Finally, we outline how attackers and defenders may differ in their response to emotion-based interventions that aim to promote conflict resolution.
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  34.  28
    Two Kinds of Respect for Two Kinds of Contempt: Why Contempt Can Be Both a Sentiment and an Emotion.Florian Cova, Julien Deonna, David Sander & Fabrice Teroni - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    Gervais & Fessler argue that because contempt is a sentiment, it cannot be an emotion. However, like many affective labels, it could be that “contempt” refers both to a sentiment and to a distinct emotion. This possibility is made salient by the fact that contempt can be defined by contrast with respect, but that there are different kinds of respect.
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  35.  25
    Lost in Intensity: Is There an Empirical Solution to the Quasi-Emotions Debate?Steve Humbert-Droz, Amanda Ludmilla Garcia, Vanessa Sennwald, Fabrice Teroni, Julien Deonna, David Sander & Florian Cova - 2020 - Aesthetic Investigations 4:460-482.
    Contrary to the emotions we feel in everyday contexts, the emotions we feel for fictional characters do not seem to require a belief in the existence of their object. This observation has given birth to a famous philosophical paradox (the ‘paradox of fiction’), and has led some philosophers to claim that the emotions we feel for fictional characters are not genuine emotions but rather “quasi-emotions”. Since then, the existence of quasi-emotions has been a hotly debated issue. Recently, philosophers and psychologists (...)
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  36.  11
    Mindful Regulation of Positive Emotions: A Comparison with Reappraisal and Expressive Suppression.Fanny Lalot, Sylvain Delplanque & David Sander - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    It is often acknowledged that mindfulness facilitates emotion regulation on a long-term scale. Only few empirical studies support the hypothesis that even a brief mindfulness induction among subjects without previous experience of meditation allows an effective reduction of both positive and negative emotions. To the best of our knowledge, this hypothesis has never been tested when comparing mindfulness to other regulation strategies known to be effective. The current study investigates the effects of mindfulness, reappraisal and expressive suppression during the regulation (...)
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  37.  15
    When at Rest: “Event-Free” Active Inference May Give Rise to Implicit Self-Models of Coping Potential.Ryan J. Murray, Philip Gerrans, Tobias Brosch & David Sander - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  38.  6
    Sensitivity of Physiological Emotional Measures to Odors Depends on the Product and the Pleasantness Ranges Used.Aline M. Pichon, Géraldine Coppin, Isabelle Cayeux, Christelle Porcherot, David Sander & Sylvain Delplanque - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  39.  9
    Considerations for the Study of “Incentive Hope” and Sign-Tracking Behaviors in Humans.Eva R. Pool & David Sander - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
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  40. Oxford Handbook of Value: The Affective Sciences of Values and Valuation.David Sander & Tobias Brosch (eds.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
  41. The Amygdala.David Sander - 2009 - In David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Emotion and the Affective Sciences. Oxford University Press. pp. 28--32.
  42.  24
    Untimely Reviews.David Sander, Julien Deonna, Florian Cova & Anna Marmodoro - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):539-539.
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  43.  13
    Emotion Perception From a Componential Perspective.Vera Shuman, Elizabeth Clark-Polner, Ben Meuleman, David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):47-56.