Results for 'David Sanford Horner'

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  1. Cyborgs and Cyberspace. Personal Identity and Moral Agency.David Sanford Horner - 2001 - In Sally Munt (ed.), Technospaces: Inside the New Media. Continuum.
     
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  2.  68
    Moral Luck and Computer Ethics: Gauguin in Cyberspace. [REVIEW]David Sanford Horner - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (4):299-312.
    Issue Title: Moral Luck, Social Networking Sites, and Trust on the Web I argue that the problem of 'moral luck' is an unjustly neglected topic within Computer Ethics. This is unfortunate given that the very nature of computer technology, its 'logical malleability', leads to ever greater levels of complexity, unreliability and uncertainty. The ever widening contexts of application in turn lead to greater scope for the operation of chance and the phenomenon of moral luck. Moral luck bears down most heavily (...)
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  3. Review of David Sanford: If P, Then Q. [REVIEW]Frank Jackson - 1990 - Theoria 56 (1/2):121.
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  4. Using Factor Analysis to Test a Measure of Student Metacognitive Ability Related to Critical Thinking and Intellectual Humility.Jeff Roberts, David E. Wright & Glenn M. Sanford - 2017 - Intersection of Assessment and Learning 2017 (Fall):31-37.
    Locally-developed measures represent great tools for institutions to use in assessing student outcomes. Such measures can be easy to administer, can be cost-effective, and can provide meaningful data for improving student learning. However, many institutions struggle with questions surrounding the quality of their locally-developed assessments. Are their instruments reliable? Are their instruments valid? Can the data generated from these instruments be trusted to drive change and improvement? The good news for faculty, staff, and assessment professionals is that there are steps (...)
     
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  5. Being Human: Groundwork for a Theological Anthropology for the Twenty-First Century.David Kirchhoffer, Robyn Horner & Patrick McArdle (eds.) - 2013 - Preston: Mosaic Press.
    What does it mean to be human? The traditional answers from the past remain only theoretical possibilities unless they come to mean something to today's generation. Moreover, in light of new knowledge and circumstances, a new generation may call these old answers into question, and seek to reinterpret, or, indeed, provide alternatives to them. In the 1960's, the Catholic Church's Second Vatican Council attempted such a reinterpretation, an aggiornamento, for the post-war generation of the mid-twentieth century by proposing, in Gaudium (...)
     
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  6. David H. Sanford, If P, Then Q: Conditionals and the Foundations of Reasoning Reviewed By.Romane Clark - 1991 - Philosophy in Review 11 (2):131-133.
     
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  7.  1
    Experience and the Objects of Perception.David H. Sanford - 1987 - Noûs 21 (3):435-438.
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  8.  39
    Resemblance and Identity: An Examination of the Problem of Universals.David Sanford - 1968 - Philosophical Review 77 (3):386-389.
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  9.  23
    Hume and the Problem of Causation.David H. Sanford - 1983 - Noûs 17 (3):502-508.
  10.  9
    Causal Asymmetries.David H. Sanford - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):243-246.
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  11. Letters to the Editor.Sanford G. Thatcher, James S. Stramel, Heather Blair, David Christensen, Ronald De Sousa, Timothy F. Murphy, Paul Raymont, Harold J. Dumain, Joseph A. Grispino, Todd Volker, Anto Knežević & Karen M. Kuss - 1995 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 68 (5):107 - 122.
    A letter protesting the publication of a homophobic rant in the Proceedings of the APA.
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  12.  18
    From Folk Psychology to Cognitive Science: The Case Against Belief.David H. Sanford - 1986 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (1):149-154.
  13.  5
    Perception, Common Sense, and Science.David H. Sanford - 1978 - Philosophy of Science 45 (1):163-165.
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  14.  19
    Causal Dependence and Multiplicity.David H. Sanford - 1985 - Philosophy 60 (232):215-230.
    In "Causes and "If P, Even If X, still Q," Philosophy 57 (July 1982), Ted Honderich cites my "The Direction of Causation and the Direction of Conditionship," journal of Philosophy 73 (April 22, 1976) as an example of an account of causal priority that lacks the proper character. After emending Honderich's description of the proper character, I argue that my attempt to account for one-way causation in terms of one-way causal conditionship does not totally lack it. Rather than emphasize the (...)
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  15.  44
    Causation and Intelligibility.David H. Sanford - 1994 - Philosophy 69 (267):55 - 67.
    Hume, in "An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding", holds (1) that all causal reasoning is based on experience and (2) that causal reasoning is based on nothing but experience. (1) does not imply (2), and Hume's good reasons for (1) are not good reasons for (2). This essay accepts (1) and argues against (2). A priori reasoning plays a role in causal inference. Familiar examples from Hume and from classroom examples of sudden disappearances and radical changes do not show otherwise. A (...)
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  16.  10
    Book Review:Perception, Common Sense, and Science James W. Cornman. [REVIEW]David H. Sanford - 1978 - Philosophy of Science 45 (1):163-.
  17.  27
    Impartial Perception.David H. Sanford - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (225):392 - 395.
    Wittgenstein remarks in the "Tractatus" that the eye is not in the visual field. I question the claim of Michael Dummett and P T Geach that reflection on this remark helps one conceive of an observer perceiving objects in space without having any location in that space. The literal meaning of "point of view" is illustrated by the visual field. Reflection on the fact that the point of view is not itself normally an object of sight is no help in (...)
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  18.  23
    Elbow Room: The Varieties of Free Will Worth Wanting By Daniel C. Dennett Clarendon Press, 1985, X + 200 Pp., £17.50, £7.95 Paper. [REVIEW]David H. Sanford - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (238):547-.
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  19.  45
    McTaggart on Time.David H. Sanford - 1968 - Philosophy 43 (166):371 - 378.
    McTaggart argues that the A series, which orders events with reference to past, present, and future, involves an inescapable contradiction. The significant difference between the earlier version of his argument (Mind, 1908) and the version in The Nature of Existence, Volume II, Chapter 33 (1927), has often gone unnoticed. His arguments are all invalid; the conclusion can be rejected without rejecting any premiss. It is therefore unnecessary to adopt any philosophical thesis about time (e.g., that some token-reflexive analysis of tensed (...)
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  20.  35
    The Direction of Causation and the Direction of Time.David H. Sanford - 1984 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 9 (1):53-75.
    I revise J L Mackie's first account of casual direction by replacing his notion of "fixity" by a newly defined notion of "sufficing" that is designed to accommodate indeterminism. Keeping Mackie's distinction between casual order and casual direction, I then consider another revision that replaces "fixity" with "one-way conditionship". In response to the charge that all such accounts of casual priority beg the question by making an unjustified appeal to temporal priority, i maintain that one-way conditionship explains rather that assumes (...)
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  21. Buddhism, Its Essence and Development.Edward Conze, I. B. Horner, David Snellgrove & Arthur Waley - 1957 - Philosophy East and West 7 (1):65-69.
     
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  22.  44
    Jean Porter: Nature as Reason: A Thomistic Theory of the Natural Law. [REVIEW]David A. Horner - 2007 - Faith and Philosophy 24 (1):103-107.
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  23. Is Aquinas an Act-Ethicist or an Agent-Ethicist?David A. Horner - 2006 - The Thomist 70 (2):237-265.
     
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  24.  27
    Error: (On Our Predicament When Things Go Wrong).David A. Horner - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 61 (2):443-444.
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  25.  71
    What It Takes to Be Great: Aristotle and Aquinas on Magnaminity.David A. Horner - 1998 - Faith and Philosophy 15 (4):415-444.
    The revival of virtue ethics is largely inspired by Aristotle, but few---especially Christians---follow him in seeing virtue supremely exemplified in the “magnanimous” man. However, Aristotle raises a matter of importance: the character traits and type of psychological stance exemplified in those who aspire to acts of extraordinary excellence. I explore the accounts of magnanimity found in both Aristotle and Aquinas, defending the intelligibility and acceptability of some central elements of a broadly Aristotelian conception of magnanimity. Aquinas, I argue, provides insight (...)
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  26. Being HumanGroundwork for a Theological Anthropology for the 21st Century.David Kirchhoffer, Robyn Horner & Patrick McArdle (eds.) - 2013
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  27. What is a Truth Functional Component?David H. Sanford - 1970 - Logique Et Analyse 52:4483-486.
    Although the truth value (falsity) of "Henry knows that (dogs live in trees and beavers chew wood)" remains unchanged no matter what sentence is substituted in it for "beavers chew wood", we want not to regard the second as a truth functional component (tfc) of the first. Many definitions of "tfc" (e.g., Quine's) fail to insure satisfaction of the following principle: if p is a component of r which is in turn a component of q, then p is a tfc (...)
     
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  28. Where Was I?David H. Sanford - 1981 - In D. R. Hofstadter & D. C. Dennett (eds.), The Mind's I: Fantasies and Reflections on Self and Soul. New York: Basic Books. pp. 232-40.
    This piece continues the story line of “Where Am I?” by Dan Dennett. I am inclined to locate myself at the location of my point of view. In my fantasy stories, points of view can be far away from a brain inside a flesh-and-blood body. Points of view can also move discontinuously from one location to another.
     
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  29. Monitoring and Anti-Reductionism in the Epistemology of Testimony.Sanford Goldberg & David Henderson - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (3):600 - 617.
    One of the central points of contention in the epistemology of testimony concerns the uniqueness (or not) of the justification of beliefs formed through testimony--whether such justification can be accounted for in terms of, or 'reduced to,' other familiar sort of justification, e.g. without relying on any epistemic principles unique to testimony. One influential argument for the reductionist position, found in the work of Elizabeth Fricker, argues by appeal to the need for the hearer to monitor the testimony for credibility. (...)
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  30. Pre-Phenomenal Adjustments and the Müller-Lyer Illusion.David H. Sanford - 1984 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 65 (2):199.
     
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  31.  37
    Independent Predicates.David H. Sanford - 1981 - American Philosophical Quarterly 18 (2):171 - 174.
  32. Topological Trees: G H von Wright's Theory of Possible Worlds.David H. Sanford - 1998 - In TImothy Childers (ed.), The Logica Yearbook. Acadamy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.
    In several works on modality, G. H. von Wright presents tree structures to explain possible worlds. Worlds that might have developed from an earlier world are possible relative to it. Actually possible worlds are possible relative to the world as it actually was at some point. Many logically consistent worlds are not actually possible. Transitions from node to node in a tree structure are probabilistic. Probabilities are often more useful than similarities between worlds in treating counterfactual conditionals.
     
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  33. Temporal Parts. Temporal Portions, and Temporal Slices: An Exercise in Naive Mereology.David H. Sanford - 2000 - Acta Analytica 15:21-33.
    Naive mereology studies ordinary conceptions of part and whole. Parts, unlike portions, have objective boundaries and many things, such as dances and sermons have temporal parts. In order to deal with Mark Heller's claim that temporal parts "are ontologically no more or less basic than the wholes that they compose," we retell the story of Laplace's Genius, here named "Swifty." Although Swifty processes lots of information very quickly, his conceptual repertoire need not extend beyond fundamental physics. So we attempt to (...)
     
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  34. The Perception of Shape.David H. Sanford - 1983 - In Carl Ginet & Sydney Shoemaker (eds.), Knowledge And Mind: Phil Essays. Oxford University Press.
    The central text of this article is Thomas Reid’s response to Berkeley’s argument for distinguishing tangible from visual shape. Reid is right to hold that shape words do not have different visual and tangible meanings. We might also perceive shape, moreover, with senses other than touch and sight. As Reid also suggests, the visual perception of shape does not require perception of hue or brightness. Contrary to treatments of the Molyneux problem by H. P. Grice and Judith Jarvis Thomson, I (...)
     
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  35. How Plausible is the Principle of Plenitude?David H. Sanford - 1978 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 59 (2):149.
    The cardinality of incompatible possibilities whose actuality requires at least N seconds exceeds the cardinality of disjoint intervals at least N seconds long. Therefore, not all logical possibilities can be actual in the long run, even if the long run is infinite.
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  36. Les activités du Centre National de Recherches de Logique en 1971.David H. Sanford - 1970 - Logique Et Analyse 13 (52):(1970:déc.).
     
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  37. Chisholm on Brentano's Thesis.David H. Sanford - 1997 - In Lewis Edwin Hahn (ed.), The Philosophy of Roderick M. Chisholm. Chicago: Open Court. pp. 25--201.
    Roderick Chisholm provides, in different places, two formulations of Brentano's thesis about the relation between the psychological and the intentional: (1) all and only psychological sentences are intentional; (2) no psychological intentional sentence is equivalent to a nonintentional sentence. Chisholm also presents several definitions of intentionality. Some of these allow that a sentence is intentional while its negation is nonintentional, which ruins the prospects of defending the more plausible and interesting thesis (2). A generalization of the notion of logical independence (...)
     
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  38. Uses and Abuses of Fuzziness in Philosophy.David H. Sanford - 1995 - International Journal of General Systems 23 (1):271.
  39. Knowledge And Mind: Phil Essays.David H. Sanford - 1983 - Oxford University Press.
     
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  40. Infinite Regress Arguments.David Sanford - 1984 - In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Principles of Philosophical Reasoning. Rowman & Allanheld. pp. 93--117.
     
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  41.  42
    If P, Then Q: Conditionals and the Foundations of Reasoning.David H. Sanford - 1989 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    This new edition includes three new chapters, updating the book to take into account developments in the field over the past fifteen years.
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  42. If P Then Q Conditionals and the Foundations of Reasoning.David Sanford - 1991 - Behavior and Philosophy 19 (2):103-107.
     
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  43.  39
    Borderline Logic.David H. Sanford - 1975 - American Philosophical Quarterly 12 (1):29-39.
    To accommodate vague statements and predicates, I propose an infinite-valued, non-truth-functional interpretation of logic on which the tautologies are exactly the tautologies of classical two-valued logic. iI introduce a determinacy operator, analogous to the necessity operator in alethic modal logic, to allow the definition of first-order and higher-order borderline cases. On the interpretation proposed for determinacy, every statement corresponding to a theorem of modal system T is a logical truth, and I conjecture that every logical truth on the interpretation corresponds (...)
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  44. Review of Linda Bruns. [REVIEW]David H. Sanford - 1993 - Mind 102 (1):357--60.
     
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  45.  4
    Review: Demolishing the Standard View. [REVIEW]David H. Sanford - 1996 - Behavior and Philosophy 24 (2):181 - 186.
  46.  5
    Causal Asymmetries.David H. Sanford - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):243-246.
    Time and cause present apparent asymmetries. What happens later depends on what happens earlier, and not the other way around. Effects depend on their causes, and not the other way around.
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  47. Causation.David H. Sanford - 2009 - In Jaegwon Kim, Ernest Sosa & Gary S. Rosenkrantz (eds.), A Companion to Metaphysics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Twenty-one paragraphs in this entry begin with a statement of a view about causation. To help organize the entry, the next sentence then classifies the view as 'prevailing, majority, controversial', or 'minority'. The following brief discussions attempt to be clear and fair. Respect for fairness, however, does not prevent the author from referring to his own views. For example, the author classifies "There is no element of genuine a priori reasoning in causal inference" as a majority view. After expounded the (...)
     
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  48.  25
    Symposium Contribution on Events and Their Names by Jonathan Bennett.Review author[S.]: David H. Sanford - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):633-636.
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  49.  23
    Difficulties for the Reconciling and Estranging Projects: Some Symmetries.David H. Sanford - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):240-244.
    Suppose that Susan did not go to the movies. The reconciling project attempts to show that this plus Determinism does not imply that Susan could not have gone to the movies. The estranging project attempts to show the opposite. A counter-entailment argument is of the form A is consistent with C, and C entails not-B, therefore A does not entail B. An instance of the counter-entailment arguments undermines a central argument for the reconciling project. Another instance undermines a central argument (...)
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  50.  91
    Determinates Vs. Determinables.David H. Sanford - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Everything red is colored, and all squares are polygons. A square is distinguished from other polygons by being four-sided, equilateral, and equiangular. What distinguishes red things from other colored things? This has been understood as a conceptual rather than scientific question. Theories of wavelengths and reflectance and sensory processing are not considered. Given just our ordinary understanding of color, it seems that what differentiates red from other colors is only redness itself. The Cambridge logician W. E. Johnson introduced the terms (...)
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