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David Simpson [37]David G. Simpson [1]David D. Simpson [1]
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  1. Lying, Liars and Language.David Simpson - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (3):623-639.
    This paper considers the phenomenon of lying and the implications it has for those subjects who are capable of lying. It is argued that lying is not just intentional untruthfulness, but is intentional untruthfulness plus an insincere invocation of trust. Understood in this way, lying demands of liars a sophistication in relation to themselves, to language, and to those to whom they lie which exceeds the demands on mere truth-tellers.
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  2.  11
    Assertion: On the Philosophical Significance of Assertoric Speech, by Sanford C. Goldberg: New York: Oxford University Press, 2015, Pp. Xix + 308, £45. [REVIEW]David Simpson - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (2):415-416.
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  3. Wittgenstein and Stage-Setting: Being Brought Into the Space of Reasons.David Simpson - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (6):1-16.
    Wittgenstein constantly invokes teaching, training and learning in his later work. It is therefore interesting to consider what role these notions play for him there. I argue that their use is central to Wittgenstein’s attempt to refute cognitivist assumptions, and to show how normative practices can be understood without the threat of circularity, grounded not in a kind of seeing, but in doing, and the natural reactions of an organism. This can generate a worry that Wittgenstein’s position is quietist and (...)
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  4.  44
    Language and Know-How.David Simpson - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):629–643.
    I address the assumption that communicative interaction is made possible by knowledge of a language. I argue that this assumption as it is usually expressed depends on an unjustified reification of language, and on an unsatisfactory understanding of ‘knowledge’. I propose instead that communicative interaction is made possible by (Rylean) know-how and by the development of (Davidsonian) passing theories. We then come to see that our focus ought to be, not on propositional knowledge of a language which we internally represent, (...)
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  5. Administrative Lies and Philosopher-Kings.David Simpson - 1996 - Philosophical Inquiry 18 (3-4):45-65.
    The question of whether lies by those who govern are acceptable receives a clear focus and an ideal case in the Republic. Against C. D. C. Reeve, and T. C. Brickhouse and N. D Smith, I argue that the Republic’s apparent recommendation of administrative lies is incoherent. While lies may be a necessary part of the City’s administration, the process and practice of lying undermines that nature which is necessary for any suitable ruler – rendering the ideal impossible. I argue (...)
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  6. Interpretation and Skill: On the Passing Theory.David Simpson - 1998 - ProtoSociology 11:93-109.
    In this paper I argue, that Donald Davidson's rejection of the notion of language, as commonly understood in philosophy and linguistics, is justified. However, I argue that his position needs to be supplemented by an account of the development and nurture of pre-linguistic communicative skills. Davidson argues that knowledge of a language is neither sufficient nor necessary for 'linguistic' communication. The strongest argument against the initial formulation is that while Davidson may have shown that knowledge of a language is not (...)
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  7. Communicative Skills in the Constitution of Illocutionary Acts.David Simpson - 1992 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 70 (1):82 – 92.
    Austin's distinction between locutionary and illocutionary acts has offered a fruitful way of focussing the relation between language and communication. In particular, by adopting the distinction we attend to linguistic and communicative subjects as actors, not just processors or conduits of information. Yet in many attempts to explicate the constitution of illocutionary acts the subject as actor is subsumed within the role of linguistic rules or conventions. I propose an account of illocutionary acts in which rules or conventions are secondary (...)
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  8. Interpretation and Skill: On Passing Theory.David Simpson - 2003 - In G. Preyer, G. Peter & M. Ulkan (eds.), Concepts of Meaning: Framing an Integrated theory of Linguistic Behavior. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    I argue that Donald Davidson's rejection of the notion of language, as commonly understood in philosophy and linguistics, is justified. However, I argue that his position needs to be supplemented by an account of the development and nurture of pre-linguistic communicative skills. Davidson argues (in 'A Nice Derangement of Epitaphs' and elsewhere) that knowledge of a language (conceived of as a set of rules or conventions) is neither sufficient nor necessary for 'linguistic' communication. The strongest argument against the initial formulation (...)
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  9.  73
    Irony, Dissociation and the Self.David Simpson - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (6):119-135.
    Within the philosophy of language, irony is not a terribly popular topic. For the most part its status is that of a peripheral and derivative oddity, and when it has been discussed, it has tended to be as an aside to a discussion of its more popular purported cousin, metaphor. My major goal here is to help drag irony towards the centre of attention, in two ways. First, in the course of sorting through the account of verbal irony I want (...)
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  10. Codend Selection of Winter Flounder Pseudopleuronectes Americanus.David G. Simpson - 1987 - Laguna 53:56.
     
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  11.  37
    Truth, Perspectivism, and Philosophy.David Simpson - 2012 - eLogos 2012 (2):1-17.
    In Nietzsche’s later work the problem of the possibility of philosophy presents a significant interpretative and practical dilemma. Nietzsche attempts to undermine the idea of the absolute, as a source of value, meaning and truth, and to tease out the traces of this idea in our philosophising. He is thus one of those who has given us the means to complete the Kantian project of moving beyond metaphysical realism and a representational understanding of meaning. However, along with the gift comes (...)
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  12.  56
    Truth, Truthfulness and Philosophy in Plato and Nietzsche.David Simpson - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):339 – 360.
    Even those aware of Nietzsches ambivalent (rather than purely negative) attitude to Plato, tend to accept Nietzsches account of Plato and himself as occupying the poles of philosophy. Much that Nietzsche says supports this view, but we need not take him at his word. I consider Nietzsche and Plato on three planes: their view of truth, their view of philosophy, and their use of certain emblematic figures (the New Philosopher, the Philosopher King) as the bearers of philosophys future. On these (...)
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  13.  3
    Lying, Liars and Language.David Simpson - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (3):623-639.
    This paper considers the phenomenon of lying and the implications it has for those subjects who are capable of lying. It is argued that lying is not just intentional untruthfulness, but is intentional untruthfulness plus an insincere invocation of trust. Understood in this way, lying demands of liars a sophistication in relation to themselves, to language, and to those to whom they lie which exceeds the demands on mere truth-tellers.
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  14. German Aesthetic and Literary Criticism.David Simpson (ed.) - 1984 - Cambridge University Press.
  15. Camus, Albert.David Simpson - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Albert Camus Albert Camus was a French-Algerian journalist, playwright, novelist, philosophical essayist, and Nobel laureate. Though he was neither by advanced training nor profession a philosopher, he nevertheless made important, forceful contributions to a wide range of issues in moral philosophy in his novels, reviews, articles, essays, and speeches—from terrorism and political violence to … Continue reading Camus, Albert →.
     
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  16.  13
    Wittgenstein and Stage-Setting: Being Brought Into the Space of Reasons.David Simpson - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (6):624-639.
    I hope to clarify and explicate an account of how a creature comes to be brought into the space of reasons – that is, comes to take its place as a rational agent in social practices. My ultimate interest, however, is with a tension apparently generated by the emphasis on training coupled with this attack on cognitivism. If one’s coming to maturity depends on one being embedded in a practice, so that one comes to adopt, with ‘comfortable certainty’, the common (...)
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  17.  13
    Literary Criticism and the Return to "History".David Simpson - 1988 - Critical Inquiry 14 (4):721-747.
    If any emergent historical criticism will tend by its own choice toward inclusiveness and eclecticism, it is also likely to be constrained by more subtle forms of complicity with the theoretical subculture within which it seeks its audience. It is not in principle impossible that we might choose to set going an initiative that is very different indeed from the methods and approaches already in place. But is nonetheless clear that we must be aware, in some propaedeutic way, of the (...)
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  18.  3
    German Aesthetic and Literary Crtiticism, Vol. 1: Winckelmann, Lessing, Hamann, Herder, Schiller and GoetheGerman Aesthetic and Literary Crtiticism, Vol. 2: Kant, Fichte, Schelling, Schopenhauer, HegelGerman Aesthetic and Literary Crtiticism, Vol. 3: The Romantic Ironists and Goethe. [REVIEW]Herbert M. Schueller, H. B. Nisbet, David Simpson & Kathleen Wheeler - 1987 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (3):301.
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  19.  11
    Criticism, Politics, and Style in Wordsworth's Poetry.David Simpson - 1984 - Critical Inquiry 11 (1):52-81.
    Questions could and should be raised about the political profile of English Romanticism both in particular and in general. Wordsworth’s poetry is especially useful to me here because of the way in which, through formal discontinuities, it dramatizes political conflicts. Reacting against these discontinuities, aesthetically minded critics have simply tended to leave out of the canon those poems which have the greatest capacity to help us become aware of a political poetics. In this respect it may well be that Wordsworth (...)
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  20.  20
    Renewing Meaning: A Speech-Act Theoretic Account by Stephen J. Barker.David Simpson - 2006 - Philosophical Books 47 (3):275-277.
  21.  27
    Albert Camus.David Simpson - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  22.  9
    Is Literary History the History of Everything? The Case for "Antiquarian" History.David Simpson - 1999 - Substance 28 (1):5.
  23. Pascal, Blaise.David Simpson - 2014 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Blaise Pascal (1623–1662) Blaise Pascal was a French philosopher, mathematician, scientist, inventor, and theologian. In mathematics, he was an early pioneer in the fields of game theory and probability theory. In philosophy he was an early pioneer in existentialism. As a writer on theology and religion he was a defender of Christianity. Despite chronic ill […].
     
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  24.  7
    Virtual Commemoration: The Iraqi Memorial Project.Joseph DeLappe & David Simpson - 2011 - Critical Inquiry 37 (4):615-626.
    Except under extraordinary circumstances, most of us do not look forward with any eagerness to our own deaths. That said, one of the few positive thoughts that can accompany the prospect of dying is the possibility of being remembered with affection or respect. Those of us living ordinary lives out of the public eye would expect to be lamented by our loved ones and commemorated in their living memories and perhaps by some modest headstone or plaque in a place that (...)
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  25. Lucretius.David Simpson - 2002 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  26.  4
    Anchoring Effects of Trait Range in Impression Formation.David D. Simpson, Thomas M. Ostrom & Lloyd R. Sloan - 1973 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 2 (6):383-384.
  27. Francis Bacon.David Simpson - 2003 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  28.  2
    Romanticism, Nationalism, and the Revolt Against Theory.David Simpson - 1995 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (1):96-98.
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  29.  2
    Expertise, Pedagogy and Practice.David Simpson & David Beckett - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (6):1-6.
    _Expertise, Pedagogy and Practice_ takes as its focus recent work on situated and embodied cognition, the concepts of expertise, skill and practice, and contemporary pedagogical theory. This work has made important steps towards overcoming traditional intellectualist and individualist models of cognition, group interaction and learning, but has in turn generated a number of important questions about the shape of a model that emphasizes learning and interaction as situated and embodied. Bringing together philosophers, cognitive scientists and education theorists, the collection asks (...)
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  30.  1
    Tourism and Titanomania.David Simpson - 1999 - Critical Inquiry 25 (4):680-695.
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  31.  1
    German Aesthetic and Literary Crtiticism, Vol. 1: Winckelmann, Lessing, Hamann, Herder, Schiller and Goethe.H. B. Nisbet, David Simpson & Kathleen Wheeler - 1987 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (3):301-305.
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  32. Critica letteraria e ritorno alla "storia".David Simpson - 1996 - Studi di Estetica 13:63-92.
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  33. Expertise, Pedagogy and Practice.David Simpson & David Beckett (eds.) - 2016 - Routledge.
  34. German Aesthetic and Literary Criticism Kant, Fichte, Schelling, Schopenhauer, Hegel.David Simpson - 1984
     
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  35.  5
    Situatedness, or, Why We Keep Saying Where We Re Coming From.David Simpson - 2002 - Duke University Press.
    A distinguished critic explores the term "situatedness" - the self's position in time and place in the world and its treatment seen in legal theory, social ...
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  36. Situatedness, or, Why We Keep Saying Where We Re Coming From.David Simpson - 2002 - Duke University Press.
    “Let me tell you where I'm coming from...”—so begins many a discussion in contemporary U.S. culture. Pressed by an almost compulsive desire to situate ourselves within a definite matrix of reference points in both scholarly inquiry and everyday parlance, we seem to reject adamantly the idea of a universal human subject. Yet what does this rhetoric of self-affiliation tell us? What is its history? David Simpson’s _Situatedness_ casts a critical eye on this currently popular form of identification, suggesting that, far (...)
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  37. The Academic Postmodern and the Rule of Literature a Report on Half-Knowledge.David Simpson - 1995
     
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  38.  24
    The Origins of Modern Critical Thought: German Aesthetic and Literary Criticism From Lessing to Hegel.David Simpson (ed.) - 1988 - Cambridge University Press.
    Originally published in 1988, this book provides a comprehensive anthology in English of the major texts of German literary and aesthetic theory between Lessing ...
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  39. The Philosophy of Art.Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling, Douglas W. Stott & David Simpson - 1989
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