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  1.  18
    A Framework for Unrestricted Prenatal Whole-Genome Sequencing: Respecting and Enhancing the Autonomy of Prospective Parents.Stephanie C. Chen & David T. Wasserman - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (1):3-18.
    Noninvasive, prenatal whole genome sequencing may be a technological reality in the near future, making available a vast array of genetic information early in pregnancy at no risk to the fetus or mother. Many worry that the timing, safety, and ease of the test will lead to informational overload and reproductive consumerism. The prevailing response among commentators has been to restrict conditions eligible for testing based on medical severity, which imposes disputed value judgments and devalues those living with eligible conditions. (...)
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  2. Harms to Future People and Procreative Intentions.David T. Wasserman - 2009 - In David Wasserman & Melinda Roberts (eds.), Harming Future Persons. Springer. pp. 265--285.
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  3.  30
    Neuroethical Concerns About Moderating Traumatic Memories.S. Matthew Liao & David T. Wasserman - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):38 – 40.
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  4.  4
    Genetic Prospects: Essays on Biotechnology, Ethics, and Public Policy.Harold W. Baillie, William A. Galston, Sara Goering, Deborah Hellman, Mark Sagoff, Paul B. Thompson, Robert Wachbroit, David T. Wasserman & Richard M. Zaner (eds.) - 2003 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The essays in this volume apply philosophical analysis to address three kinds of questions: What are the implications of genetic science for our understanding of nature? What might it influence in our conception of human nature? What challenges does genetic science pose for specific issues of private conduct or public policy?
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  5.  25
    Regulating Toxic Substances: A Philosophy of Science and the Law. [REVIEW]David T. Wasserman - 1995 - Ethics 105 (3):674-676.
  6.  9
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “A Framework for Unrestricted Prenatal Whole-Genome Sequencing: Respecting and Enhancing the Autonomy of Prospective Parents”.Stephanie C. Chen & David T. Wasserman - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (1):1-3.
    Noninvasive, prenatal whole genome sequencing may be a technological reality in the near future, making available a vast array of genetic information early in pregnancy at no risk to the fetus or mother. Many worry that the timing, safety, and ease of the test will lead to informational overload and reproductive consumerism. The prevailing response among commentators has been to restrict conditions eligible for testing based on medical severity, which imposes disputed value judgments and devalues those living with eligible conditions. (...)
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  7.  76
    Criticizing and Reforming Segregated Facilities for Persons with Disabilities.Adrienne Asch, Jeffrey Blustein & David T. Wasserman - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2-3):157-168.
    In this paper, we critically appraise institutions for people with disabilities, from residential facilities to outpatient clinics to social organizations. While recognizing that a just and inclusive society would reject virtually all segregated institutional arrangements, we argue that in contemporary American society, some people with disabilities may have needs that at this time can best be met by institutional arrangements. We propose ways of reforming institutions to make them less isolating, coercive, and stigmatizing, and to provide forms of social support (...)
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