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  1. Circles of Learning Cooperation in the Classroom.David W. Johnson - 1984
     
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  2.  10
    The Limits of Language: Philosophical Hermeneutics and the Task of Comparative Philosophy.David W. Johnson - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (3):378-389.
    One of the most important accomplishments of philosophical hermeneutics has been the recovery of forms of truth fully apart from those reached by method or presented in science. This is an achievement made possible, in part, by a conception of language as essentially disclosive rather than referential. In an encounter with a text, for example, the horizons of reader and text intersect in a linguistically mediated experience that can uncover new aspects of the self and its world. In the experience (...)
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  3.  41
    Watsuji’s Topology of the Self.David W. Johnson - 2016 - Asian Philosophy 26 (3):216-240.
    ABSTRACTThis essay critically develops Watsuji’s nondual ontology of the self through the lens of ‘topological’ thought. Through close description of the embeddedness of the self in, and its emergence from, an intersubjective space which, in turn, is rooted in a particular place, Watsuji shows that the self is constituted by its relational contact with others, on the one hand, and by its immersion in a wider geo-cultural environment, on the other. Yet Watsuji himself had difficulty in smoothly bringing together and (...)
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  4.  8
    Word as image: Gadamer on the unity of word and thing.David W. Johnson - 2022 - Continental Philosophy Review 55 (1):101-118.
    One of Gadamer's largest and most characteristic concerns has been to show that hermeneutics is a form of practical philosophy. The central task of hermeneutics as practical philosophy for Gadamer is to reflectively appropriate the moral resources of our tradition in order to respond to the skepticism—characteristic of our age—about our ability to reach the truth in our normative judgments. Practical philosophy in this sense depends upon Gadamer’s conception of language as disclosive of truth. The form of disclosure that is (...)
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    The Experience of Truth.David W. Johnson - 2015 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 36 (2):373-396.
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    Perception, Expression, and the Continuity of Being: Some Intersections Between Nishida and Gadamer.David W. Johnson - 2014 - Asian Philosophy 24 (1):48-66.
    This article draws on Nishida’s ontology to shed light on some problems with Gadamer’s concept of dialogical truth. This form of truth relies on the claim that self and world ‘belong together’ as aspects of a single, unitary phenomenon, one which is made manifest in language. This view has difficulty, however, accounting for the expression in language of that which is distorted, mistaken, or untruthful. To get past these difficulties, I suggest that we turn to the more dynamic and developmental (...)
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  7.  22
    Self in Nature, Nature in the Lifeworld: A Reinterpretation of Watsuji's Concept of Fūdo.David W. Johnson - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 68 (4):1134-1154.
    One of the most important and least well-understood notions in Watsuji Tetsurō's philosophical oeuvre is the concept of fūdo 風土, which has been variously translated into English as climate and culture, climate, and milieu. Due to the difficulty of translating this term into English, and to the unsatisfactory nature of these alternatives, we will leave this word untranslated here.1 According to Watsuji, fūdo is a "general term which designates the climate, the weather conditions, the nature of the soil, and the (...)
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  8. Fūdo as the Disclosure of Nature: Rereading Watsuji with Heidegger.David W. Johnson - 2016 - In Takeshi Morisato (ed.), Critical Perspectives on Japanese Philosophy. Chisokudo Publications & Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. pp. 299-326.
  9.  14
    Acting-Intuition and the Achievement of Perception: Merleau-Ponty with Nishida.David W. Johnson - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):693-709.
    In the opening pages of the preface to Phenomenology of Perception, Merleau-Ponty characterizes phenomenology as a style of thinking whose “efforts are concentrated upon re-achieving a direct and primitive contact with the world, and endowing that contact with philosophical status” by describing things exactly as they present themselves, offering an account of the world as we live it prior to the second-order expression found in cultural constructions such as science.1 Like other thinkers in the phenomenological tradition, Merleau-Ponty discovers in the (...)
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  10.  6
    Relational Hermeneutics: Essays in Comparative Philosophy: Edited by Paul Fairfield and Saulius Geniusas, London, Bloomsbury, 2018, 272 Pp., $74.10 (Hardcover). ISBN-10 1350077925. [REVIEW]David W. Johnson - 2020 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 12 (1):76-79.
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  11.  5
    The Anonymous Subject of Life—Some Philosophical, Psychological, and Religious Considerations.David W. Johnson - 2019 - Research in Phenomenology 49 (3):385-402.
    One of the hallmarks of the Japanese psychiatrist and philosopher Kimura Bin’s philosophical approach is the conversion of ordinary words into philosophical concepts. Here we focus on the way he appropriates the Japanese words onozukara and mizukara, ordinary terms associated, respectively, with things that occur naturally, spontaneously, or by themselves, and those that come from oneself. This re-reading of these terms as philosophical concepts furnishes an interpretive frame that brings together and makes sense of large and important concepts in philosophy (...)
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  12.  7
    Intellectual Legacy: Cooperation and Competition.David W. Johnson & Roger T. Johnson - 2011 - In Peter T. Coleman (ed.), Conflict, Interdependence, and Justice. Springer. pp. 41--63.
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