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  1.  26
    Greek History 479–323 B.C. - S. Hornblower: The Greek World 479–323 B.C. Pp. Xi + 354; 4 Maps. London: Methuen, 1983. £13.95. [REVIEW]David Whitehead - 1985 - The Classical Review 35 (1):112-114.
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  2.  19
    M. J. Osborne, S. G. Byrne: The Foreign Residents of Athens: An Annex to the Lexicon of Greek Personal Names: Attica. (Studia Hellenistica, 33.) Pp. Xxvii + 479. Leuven: Peeters, 1996. Paper, Belg. Frs. 2,500. ISBN 90-6831-883-7. [REVIEW]David Whitehead - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):233-234.
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  3.  1
    Hypereides: The Forensic Speeches.David Whitehead - 2000 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Professor Whitehead has provided a new translation of the five surviving forensic speeches of the Athenian lawyer-politician Hypereides. Hypereides' importance lies not only in his speeches, but also in his centrality in the political life of ancient Athens, as a contemporary of Demosthenes, and one of the canonical Ten Attic Orators. This book, which includes a general introduction and lavish historical and literary commentary, represents the first complete collection of Hypereides' works in any language.
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  4. 'O Neosigma Delta Asigma Mosigma: Tribute in Classical Athens.David Whitehead - 1998 - Hermes 126 (2):173-188.
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  5.  30
    Philip II J. R. Ellis: Philip II and Macedonian Imperialism. (Aspects of Greek and Roman Life.) Pp. 312; 4 Maps. London: Thames & Hudson, 1976. Cloth, £9·50. [REVIEW]David Whitehead - 1978 - The Classical Review 28 (02):303-305.
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  6.  30
    Athenian Proxenies Michael B. Walbank: Athenian Proxenies of the Fifth Century B.C. Pp. Xvi + 552; 65 Plates (Black and White). Toronto and Sarasota: Samuel-Stevens, 1978. $15. [REVIEW]David Whitehead - 1981 - The Classical Review 31 (01):87-88.
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  7.  39
    OSTRACISM P. Siewert (ed.): Ostrakismos[hyphen]Testimonien I. Die Zeugnisse antiker Autoren, der Inschriften und Ostraka über das athenische Scherbengericht aus vorhellenistischer Zeit (487–322 v. Chr.) . (Historia Einzelschriften 155.) Pp. 555, ills. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2002. Cased, €100. ISBN: 3-515-07947-. [REVIEW]David Whitehead - 2003 - The Classical Review 53 (02):400-.
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  8.  25
    Ostracism. [REVIEW]David Whitehead - 2003 - The Classical Review 53 (2):400-402.
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  9.  20
    Inscribed Laws.David Whitehead - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (02):395-.
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  10.  22
    Sacred and Public Land - (N.) Papazarkadas Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens. Pp. Xii + 395. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Cased, £75, US$125. ISBN: 978-0-19-969400-6. [REVIEW]David Whitehead - 2012 - The Classical Review 62 (2):547-549.
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  11.  20
    Philip II.David Whitehead - 1978 - The Classical Review 28 (02):303-.
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  12.  27
    Review. Attic Epigraphy. Athenian Democracy in Transition: Attic Letter-Cutters of 340 to 290 BC. S V Tracy.David Whitehead - 1996 - The Classical Review 46 (2):356-357.
  13.  24
    Inscribed Laws H. Van Effenterre, F. Ruzé (Edd.): Nomima. Recueil d'Inscriptions Politiques Et Juridiques de l'Archaïsme Grec, I. (Collection de l'École Française de Rome, 188.) Pp. Xx+404, 7 Maps, 32 Ills. Rome: École Française de Rome, 1994. Paper. [REVIEW]David Whitehead - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (02):395-397.
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  14.  24
    The Myth of the Hoplite's Hoplon.J. F. Lazenby & David Whitehead - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (01):27-.
    ‘Hoplites are troops who take their name from their shields’. ‘The individual infantryman took his name, hoplites, from the hoplon or shield’. Such is the orthodox view. This paper will endeavour to show that its basis is inadequate. Rather, we shall argue, hoplites took their name from their arms and armour as a whole, their hopla in that all-encompassing sense; so that the original and essential meaning of the word hoplite was nothing more than ‘armed man’.
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  15.  14
    The Tribes of the Thirty Tyrants.David Whitehead - 1980 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 100:208-213.
  16.  17
    Kinzl (K.H.) (Ed.) A Companion to the Classical Greek World. Pp. Xx + 606 Figs, Ills, Maps. Malden, MA and Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2006. Cased, £85, US$149.95, Aus$214. ISBN: 978-0-631-23014-. [REVIEW]David Whitehead - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (1):189-191.
  17. From Poiltical Architecture to Stephanus Byzantius. Sources for the Ancient Greek.David Whitehead - 1994 - Polis 11:6572-5.
     
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  18.  6
    Review: Athenian Proxenies. [REVIEW]David Whitehead - 1981 - The Classical Review 31 (1):87-88.
  19.  10
    Polyaenus on Iphicrates.David Whitehead - 2003 - Classical Quarterly 53 (2):613-616.
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  20.  11
    ‘Theft' in Greek Oratory.David Whitehead - 2007 - Classical Quarterly 57 (01):70-.
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  21.  10
    The Lakonian Key.David Whitehead - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (01):267-.
    ‘I can make nothing’, declared Paul Cartledge in this journal some years ago, ‘of the “Lakonian key” first attested in Aristophanes ’. ; Plautus, Mostellaria 404–5, cf. 419–26.).
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  22.  10
    Two Notes on Greek Suicide.David Whitehead - 1993 - Classical Quarterly 43 (02):501-.
    Near the end of the fifth book of Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle has a brief discussion of suicide, to illustrate the question of whether one can wrong one's self. Suicide, he declares, is not enjoined by law, and what law does not enjoin, it forbids. Thus the suicide does do wrong – but to whom or what? Surely the polis, not himself . δι κα πλις ζημιο, κα ις τιμα πρσεστι τ αυτν διαφθεραντι ς π πλιν δικοντι.
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  23.  4
    The Mysterious 'Cyreneans' in [Demosthenes] 59.9.David Whitehead - 2006 - Classical Quarterly 56 (01):317-.
  24.  12
    Women and Naturalisation in Fourth-Century Athens: The Case of Archippe.David Whitehead - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (01):109-.
    What we know of citizenship, marriage and political status in Athens in the fourth century suggests that they were matters of no little public concern governed by a body of law which left few, if any, significant loopholes or anomalies. The ‘descent group’ criterion for citizenship had triumphed over the possible alternatives. The fundament of the system was the Periklean law of 451/0, re-enacted in 403/2, and prescribing double endogamy — that is, citizen birth through both parents — as the (...)
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  25.  2
    'O Νεοσ Δασμοσ:: "Tribute" in Classical Athens.David Whitehead - 1998 - Hermes 126 (2):173-188.
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  26.  3
    The Archaic Athenian ΖΕΥΓΙΤΑΙ.David Whitehead - 1981 - Classical Quarterly 31 (02):282-.
    It seems to be widely agreed by modern scholars that when Solon created his four census-classes in early sixth-century Athens he gave to at least three of them – the ππες, the ζευγται and the θτες – names which were in pre-existing use there. But what, if so, did the names signify, before being assigned their new, official, quantitative Solonic sense? The archaic Athenian θτες were presumably recognizably akin to their Homeric and Hesiodic namesakes; and despite the etymological obscurity of (...)
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