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David Wood
Vanderbilt University
  1.  81
    The Supply of Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosures Among U.S. Firms.Lori Holder-Webb, Jeffrey R. Cohen, Leda Nath & David Wood - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):497-527.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a dramatically expanding area of activity for managers and academics. Consumer demand for responsibly produced and fair trade goods is swelling, resulting in increased demands for CSR activity and information. Assets under professional management and invested with a social responsibility focus have also grown dramatically over the last 10 years. Investors choosing social responsibility investment strategies require access to information not provided through traditional financial statements and analyses. At the same time, a group of mainstream (...)
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  2.  4
    Eco-Deconstruction: Derrida and Environmental Philosophy.Matthias Fritsch, Philippe Lynes & David Wood (eds.) - 2020 - Fordham University Press.
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  3. The Provocation of Levinas: Rethinking the Other.Robert Bernasconi & David Wood (eds.) - 1988 - Routledge.
    There is a growing recognition of Levinas's importance. It can in part be attributed to an increasing concern that twentieth-century continental philosophy seems to have no place for ethics. In making ethics fundamental to philosophy, rather than a problem to which we might one day return, Levinas transforms continental thought. The book brings together some of the most interesting and far-reaching responses to the work of Levinas, in three different areas: contemporary feminism, psychotherapy, and Levinas's relation to other philosophers. It (...)
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  4.  64
    A Survey of Governance Disclosures Among U.S. Firms.Lori Holder-Webb, Jeffrey Cohen, Leda Nath & David Wood - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):543-563.
    Recent years have featured a spate of regulatory action pertaining to the development and/or disclosure of corporate governance structures in response to financial scandals resulting in part from governance failures. During the same period, corporate governance activists and institutional investors increasingly have called for increased voluntary governance disclosure. Despite this attention, there have been relatively few comprehensive studies of governance disclosure practices and response to the regulation. In this study, we examine a sample of 50 U.S. firms and their public (...)
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  5.  21
    Derrida and Differance.David Wood & Robert Bernasconi (eds.) - 1988 - Northwestern University Press.
    A Society of the Friends of Difference would have to include Heraclitus, Nietzsche, Saussure, Freud, Adorno, Heidegger, Levinas, Deleuze, and Lyotard among its most prominent members.
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  6.  10
    Violence, Aggression, and Ethics: The Link Between Exposure to Human Violence and Unethical Behavior.Joshua R. Gubler, Skye Herrick, Richard A. Price & David A. Wood - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (1):25-34.
    Can exposure to media portrayals of human violence impact an individual’s ethical decision making at work? Ethical business failures can result in enormous financial losses to individuals, businesses, and society. We study how exposure to human violence—especially through media—can cause individuals to make less ethical decisions. We present three experiments, each showing a causal link between exposure to human violence and unethical business behavior, and show this relationship is mediated by an increase in individual hostility levels as a result of (...)
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  7. Philosophy at the Limit.David Wood - 1990 - Unwin Hyman.
    The structure and style of philosophy has evolved in response to philosophy's confrontation with its own limits. Are these limits real or are they just phantoms haunting the philosophical project? How do philosophy and philosophers attempt to overcome these limits, or at least come to terms with them? In "Philosophy at the Limit" David Wood pursues this theme in modern philosophers from Hegel to Derrida including Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Heidegger and Gadamer. He focuses on questions of philosophical style, problems with dialogue (...)
     
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  8.  40
    Thinking After Heidegger.David Wood - 2002 - Polity.
    In _Thinking After Heidegger_, David Wood takes up the challenge posed by Heidegger - that after the end of philosophy we need to learn to _think_. But what if we read Heidegger with the same respectful irreverence that he brought to reading the Greeks, Kant, Hegel, Husserl and the others? For Wood, it is Derrida's engagements with Heidegger that set the standard here – enacting a repetition through transformation and displacement. But Wood is not content to crown the new king. (...)
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  9.  27
    The Deconstruction of Time.David WOOD - 1989 - Humanities Press.
    Originally published in 1989, The Deconstruction of Time was the first to examine what has become the fundamental, even defining, project in continental ...
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  10. A Retributive Argument Against Punishment.Greg Roebuck & David Wood - 2011 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (1):73-86.
    This paper proposes a retributive argument against punishment, where punishment is understood as going beyond condemnation or censure, and requiring hard treatment. The argument sets out to show that punishment cannot be justified. The argument does not target any particular attempts to justify punishment, retributive or otherwise. Clearly, however, if it succeeds, all such attempts fail. No argument for punishment is immune from the argument against punishment proposed here. The argument does not purport to be an argument only against retributive (...)
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  11.  21
    Six-Year-Olds' Difficulties Handling Intensional Contexts.Sarah Hulme, Peter Mitchell & David Wood - 2003 - Cognition 87 (2):73-99.
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  12. Punishment: Consequentialism.David Wood - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (6):455-469.
    Punishment involves deliberating harming individuals. How, then, if at all, is it to be justified? This, the first of three papers on the philosophy of punishment (see also 'Punishment: Nonconsequentialism' and 'Punishment: The Future'), examines attempts to justify the practice or institution according to its consequences. One claim is that punishment reduces crime, and hence the resulting harms. Another is that punishment functions to rehabilitate offenders. A third claim is that punishment (or some forms of punishment) can serve to make (...)
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  13. On Paul Ricoeur: Narrative and Interpretation.David Wood (ed.) - 1991 - Routledge.
    This book examines the later work of Paul Ricoeur, particularly his major work, Time and Narrative. The essays, including three pieces by Ricoeur himself, consider this important study, extending and developing the debate it has inspired. Time and Narrative is the finest example of contemporary philosophical hermeneutics and is one of the most significant works of philosophy published in the late twentieth century. Paul Ricoeur's study of the intertwining of time and narrative proposes and examines the possibility that narrative could (...)
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  14.  20
    Time After Time.David Wood - 2007 - Indiana University Press.
    In Time After Time, David Wood accepts, without pessimism, the broad postmodern idea of the end of time. Wood exposes the rich, stratified, and non-linear textures of temporal complexity that characterize our world. Time includes breakdowns, repetitions, memories, and narratives that confuse a clear and open understanding of what it means to occupy time and space. In these thoughtful and powerful essays, Wood engages Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Derrida to demonstrate how repetition can preserve sameness and how creativity can interrupt (...)
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  15. The "Double Sense" of Fichte's Philosophical Language - Some Critical Reflections on the Cambridge Companion to Fichte.David W. Wood - 2017 - Revista de Estud(I)Os Sobre Fichte 15:1-12.
    The principal thesis in this review-essay is that the key linguistic terms in Fichte’s Wissenschaftslehre especially have two main meanings that appear at first sight to be almost in contradiction or opposed to each other. The reader of Fichte therefore has to work hard to overcome any apparent conflicts in the “double sense” of his philosophical terminology. Accordingly, I argue that Fichte’s linguistic method and use of language should be seen as part of his chief philosophical method of synthesis, where (...)
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  16. On Being Haunted by the Future.David Wood - 2006 - Research in Phenomenology 36 (1):274-298.
    Derrida insists that we understand the 'to-come' not as a real future 'down the road', but rather as a universal structure of immanence. But such a structure is no substitute for the hard work of taking responsibility for what are often entirely predictable and preventable disasters (9/11, the Iraq war, Katrina, global warming). Otherwise "the future can only be anticipated in the form of an absolute danger". Derrida devotes much attention to proposing, imagining, hoping for a 'future' in which im-possible (...)
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  17.  32
    The Abuse of Animals and Domestic Violence: A National Survey of Shelters for Women Who Are Battered.Frank R. Ascione, David S. Wood & Claudia V. Weber - 1997 - Society and Animals 5 (3):205-218.
    The maltreatment of animals, usually companion animals, may occur in homes where there is domestic violence, yet we have limited information about the prevalence of such maltreatment. We surveyed the largest shelters for women who are battered in 49 states and the District of Columbia. Shelters were selected if they provided overnight facilities and programs or services for children. Ninety-six percent of the shelters responded. Analysis revealed that it is common for shelters to serve women and children who talk about (...)
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  18. Derrida: A Critical Reader.David Wood (ed.) - 1992 - Blackwell.
    Jacques Derrida's prolific output has been the delight of philosophers and literary theorists for over twenty years. His influence on the way we read theoretical texts continues to be profound. No serious contemporary thinker can fail to come to terms with deconstruction and there have been a number of monographs devoted to his work. Very few, however, have combined a critical edge with a detailed knowledge of his writing. The contributors to this volume were each asked - in the most (...)
     
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  19.  33
    The Philosophical Rupture Between Fichte and Schelling: Selected Texts and Correspondence (1800-1802).J. G. Fichte, F. W. J. Schelling, Michael G. Vater & David W. Wood (eds.) - 2012 - State University of New York Press.
    Correspondence and texts by Fichte and Schelling illuminate their thought and the trajectory of their philosophical falling out.
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  20. What is Ecophenomenology?David Wood - 2001 - Research in Phenomenology 31 (1):78-95.
    What is eco-phenomenology? This paper argues that eco-phenomenology, in which are folded both an ecological phenomenology and a phenomenological ecology, offers us a way of developing a middle ground between phenomenology and naturalism, between intentionality and causality. Our grasp of Nature is significantly altered by thinking through four strands of time's plexity - the invisibility of time, the celebration of finitude, the coordination of rhythms, and the interruption and breakdown of temporal horizons. It is also transformed by a meditation on (...)
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  21.  71
    Of Derrida, Heidegger, and Spirit.David Wood (ed.) - 1993 - Northwestern University Press.
    Jacques Derrida's _De l'espirit: Heidegger et la question_ is one of his most interesting and accessible later works. In it, Derrida attempts to come to terms with Heidegger's Nazi connections by way of an extended reflection on Heidegger's use of the term "Geist." In _Of Derrida, Heidegger, and Spirit,_ David Wood presents a variety of powerful and distinctive responses to Derrida's book.
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  22.  8
    Punishment: Nonconsequentialism.David Wood - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (6):470-482.
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  23.  16
    Them’s Fightin’ Words: The Effects of Violent Rhetoric on Ethical Decision Making in Business.Joshua R. Gubler, Nathan P. Kalmoe & David A. Wood - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (3):705-716.
    Business managers regularly employ metaphorical violent rhetoric as a means of motivating their employees to action. While it might be effective to this end, research on violent media suggests that violent rhetoric might have other, less desirable consequences. This study examines how the use of metaphorical violent rhetoric by business managers impacts the ethical decision making of employees. We develop and test a model that explains how the use of violent rhetoric impacts employees’ willingness to break ethical standards, depending on (...)
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  24. Thinking God in the Wake of Kierkegaard.David Wood - 1998 - In Jonathan Rée & Jane Chamberlain (eds.), Kierkegaard: A Critical Reader. Blackwell. pp. 53--74.
     
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  25.  29
    "Mathesis of the Mind": A Study of Fichte’s Wissenschaftslehre and Geometry.David W. Wood - 2012 - New York/Amsterdam: Editions Rodopi (Brill Publishers). Fichte-Studien-Supplementa Vol. 29.
    This is an in-depth study of J.G. Fichte’s philosophy of mathematics and theory of geometry. It investigates both the external formal and internal cognitive parallels between the axioms, intuitions and constructions of geometry and the scientific methodology of the Fichtean system of philosophy. In contrast to “ordinary” Euclidean geometry, in his Erlanger Logik of 1805 Fichte posits a model of an “ursprüngliche” or original geometry – that is to say, a synthetic and constructivistic conception grounded in ideal archetypal elements that (...)
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  26.  20
    Toxicity and Transcendence: Two Faces of the Human.David Wood - 2011 - Angelaki 16 (4):31-42.
    A truly enlightened anthropocentrism that understood the human in its essential interdependency with other creatures but nonetheless concluded that the human species was toxic to the planet could identify with the life-stream and, on the basis of values it cherished, in the absence of necessary radical transformation, will its own demise. The distinctive value of the human cannot rest on virtues of which we are in principle capable but which we repeatedly fail to realize. Is there a logical or metaphysical (...)
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  27.  5
    Derrida Vert?David Wood - 2014 - Oxford Literary Review 36 (2):319-322.
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  28.  28
    Retribution, Crime Reduction and the Justification of Punishment.David Wood - 2002 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 22 (2):301-321.
    The ‘dualist project’ in the philosophy of punishment is to show how retributivist and reductivist (utilitarian) considerations can be combined to provide an adequate justification of punishment. Three types of dualist theories can be distinguished—‘split‐level’, ‘integrated’ and ‘mere conjunction’. Split‐level theories (e.g. Hart, Rawls) must be rejected, as they relegate retributivist considerations to a lesser role. An attempted integrated theory is put forward, appealing to the reductivist means of deterrence. However, it cannot explain how the two types of considerations, retributivist (...)
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  29.  83
    Punishment: The Future.David Wood - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (6):483-491.
    A companion to 'Punishment: Consequentialism' and 'Punishment: Nonconsequentialism', which examine attempts to justify punishment as a state institution, this paper considers possible alternatives to punishment. On the assumption that there are two elements to punishment, an element of condemnation and of hard treatment, the paper considers, first, the alternative of condemnation without hard treatment, and secondly, of hard treatment without condemnation. The paper then looks ahead to possible developments in thinking and theorising about punishment.
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  30.  13
    Anticipating by Pigeons Depends on Local Statistical Information in a Serial Response Time Task.Alyson L. Froehlich, Walter T. Herbranson, Julia D. Loper, David M. Wood & Charles P. Shimp - 2004 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 133 (1):31-45.
  31.  11
    Derrida and the Paradoxes of Reflection.David Wood - 1980 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 11 (3):225-238.
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  32.  89
    Kant and the Power of Imagination by Jane Kneller.David W. Wood - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):464-468.
  33.  9
    Kierkegaard and Levinas: Ethics, Politics, and Religion.J. Aaron Simmons & David Wood (eds.) - 2008 - Indiana University Press.
    Recent discussions in the philosophy of religion, ethics, and personal political philosophy have been deeply marked by the influence of two philosophers who are often thought to be in opposition to each other, Søren Kierkegaard and Emmanuel Levinas. Devoted expressly to the relationship between Levinas and Kierkegaard, this volume sets forth a more rigorous comparison and sustained engagement between them. Established and newer scholars representing varied philosophical traditions bring these two thinkers into dialogue in 12 sparkling essays. They consider similarities (...)
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  34.  10
    Much Obliged.David Wood - 1997 - Philosophy Today 41 (1):135-140.
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  35.  28
    Beyond Deconstruction?David Wood - 1987 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 21:175-194.
    There are many people who think that deconstruction has run its course, has had its day, and that it is now time to return to the important business of philosophy, or perhaps to serious ethical, social and political questions. Derrida's work, it is said, leads nowhere but a sterile philosophy of difference that in its de-politicized, de-historicized abstractness is a form of conservatism little better than the kinds of identity thinking to which it seems to be so radically opposed. In (...)
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  36.  53
    Style and Strategy at the Limits of Philosophy: Heidegger and Derrida.David Wood - 1980 - The Monist 63 (4):494-511.
    The distinction between the form and content of language, between the how and the what, is not only traditional but formative for philosophy. It is formative in that it implies their genuine separability and so authorizes focussing on one side, on the what, relegating the question of how to such ‘peripheral areas’ as rhetoric, stylistics and pragmatics.
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  37. An Introduction to Derrida.David Wood - 1979 - Radical Philosophy 21:18-28.
     
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  38.  52
    Nozick's Justification of the Minimal State.David Wood - 1978 - Ethics 88 (3):260-262.
  39.  10
    Time and the Sign.David Wood - 1982 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 13 (2):143-153.
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  40.  36
    Prolegomena to a New Theory of Time.David Wood - 1980 - Research in Phenomenology 10 (1):177-191.
  41. Passions: An Oblique Offering.David Wood & Thomas Dutoit - 1992 - In Derrida: A Critical Reader. Blackwell.
     
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  42.  30
    Novalis: Kant Studies (1797).David Wood - 2001 - Philosophical Forum 32 (4):323–338.
  43.  23
    Heidegger After Derrida.David Wood - 1987 - Research in Phenomenology 17 (1):103-116.
  44.  20
    Book Notes. [REVIEW]Ilan Alon, Richard C. Woodbridge, Tony Diana, Scott Erickson, Richard Smith & David Wood - 2003 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 15 (4):81-84.
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  45.  75
    Reductivism, Retributivism, and the Civil Detention of Dangerous Offenders.David Wood - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (1):131.
    The paper examines one objection to the suggestion that, rather than being subjected to extended prison sentences on the one hand, or simply released on the other, dangerous offenders should be in principle liable to some form of civil detention on completion of their normal sentences. This objection raises the spectre of a, pursuing various reductivist means outside the criminal justice system. The objection also threatens to undermine dualist theories of punishment, theories which combine reductivist and retributivist considerations. The paper (...)
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  46.  8
    Book Notes. [REVIEW]Sel Dibooglu, John Magney, David Wood, Scott Erickson, Eric Miller, Gert-Jan Hospers & Richard Abel - 2003 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 16 (3):163-183.
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  47.  1
    Introduction.Matthias Fritsch, Philippe Lynes & David Wood - 2020 - In Matthias Fritsch, Philippe Lynes & David Wood (eds.), Eco-Deconstruction: Derrida and Environmental Philosophy. Fordham University Press. pp. 1-26.
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  48. Introduction: Poetics of Resistance.Cornelia Gräbner & David Wood - unknown
    The following text provides a conceptual and theoretical introduction to a collection of essays written by members of the multidisciplinary network of scholars, artists and cultural producers named ‘Poetics of Resistance’, which seeks to analyse and encourage discussion of the relationships between creativity, culture and political resistance, in the context of neoliberal globalization. The introduction also provides a critical glossary of a set of loosely interlinking keywords, following Raymond Williams, that mark points of encounter and departure between the approaches of (...)
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  49.  4
    Poetics of Resistance: Introduction.Cornelia Gräbner & David Mj Wood - 2010 - Cosmos and History 6 (2):1-19.
  50. Linda B. Smith, Susan S. Jones, Hanako Yoshida and Eliana Colunga (Indiana University) Whose Dam Account? Attentional Learning Explains Booth and Waxman, 209–213.Sarah Hulme, Peter Mitchell, David Wood, Michele Miozzo, Min Wang, Keiko Koda, Charles A. Perfetti, James R. Brockmole, Ranxiao Frances Wang & Jeffrey Lidz - 2003 - Cognition 87:237-239.
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1 — 50 / 118