226 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Donald Davidson [224]Donald D. Davidson [1]Donald A. Davidson [1]
  1. Inquiries Into Truth And Interpretation.Donald Davidson - 1984 - Oxford University Press.
    Now in a new edition, this volume updates Davidson's exceptional Inquiries into Truth and Interpretation (1984), which set out his enormously influential philosophy of language. The original volume remains a central point of reference, and a focus of controversy, with its impact extending into linguistic theory, philosophy of mind, and epistemology. Addressing a central question--what it is for words to mean what they do--and featuring a previously uncollected, additional essay, this work will appeal to a wide audience of philosophers, linguists, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   685 citations  
  2. Actions, Reasons, and Causes.Donald Davidson - 1963 - Journal of Philosophy 60 (23):685.
    What is the relation between a reason and an action when the reason explains the action by giving the agent's reason for doing what he did? We may call such explanations rationalizations, and say that the reason rationalizes the action. In this paper I want to defend the ancient - and common-sense - position that rationalization is a species of ordinary causal explanation. The defense no doubt requires some redeployment, but not more or less complete abandonment of the position, as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   656 citations  
  3. Mental Events.Donald Davidson - 1970 - In L. Foster & J. W. Swanson (eds.), Essays on Actions and Events. Clarendon Press. pp. 207-224.
  4. Essays on Actions and Events.Donald Davidson - 1970 - Clarendon Press.
  5. Knowing One's Own Mind.Donald Davidson - 1987 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 60 (3):441-458.
  6. What Metaphors Mean.Donald Davidson - 2010 - In Darragh Byrne & Max Kölbel (eds.), Critical Inquiry. Routledge. pp. 31.
    The concept of metaphor as primarily a vehicle for conveying ideas, even if unusual ones, seems to me as wrong as the parent idea that a metaphor has a special meaning. I agree with the view that metaphors cannot be paraphrased, but I think this is not because metaphors say something too novel for literal expression but because there is nothing there to paraphrase. Paraphrase, whether possible or not, inappropriate to what is said: we try, in paraphrase, to say it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   101 citations  
  7. A Coherence Theory of Truth and Knowledge.Donald Davidson - 1986 - In Ernest LePore (ed.), Truth and Interpretation. Perspectives on the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. Blackwell. pp. 307-319.
  8. On the Very Idea of a Conceptual Scheme.Donald Davidson - 1973 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 47:5-20.
  9. Subjective, Intersubjective, Objective: Philosophical Essays Volume 3.Donald Davidson - 2001 - Clarendon Press.
    Subjective, Intersubjective, Objective is the long-awaited third volume of philosophical writings by Donald Davidson, whose influence on philosophy since the 1960s has been deep and broad. Davidson 's first two collections, published by OUP in the early 1980s, are recognized as contemporary classics. His ideas have continued to flow, and now he presents a selection of his best work on knowledge, mind, and language from the last two decades--a rich and rewarding feast for anyone interested in philosophy today, and essential (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   86 citations  
  10. Truth, Language and History.Donald Davidson - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Truth, Language, and History is the much-anticipated final volume of Donald Davidson's philosophical writings. In four groups of essays, Davidson continues to explore the themes that occupied him for more than fifty years: the relations between language and the world; speaker intention and linguistic meaning; language and mind; mind and body; mind and world; mind and other minds. He asks: what is the role of the concept of truth in these explorations? And, can a scientific world view make room for (...)
  11.  98
    Who is Fooled?Donald Davidson - 2004 - In Problems of Rationality. Oxford University Press.
    Applies and extends the conclusions of the preceding chapters by examining cases of self‐deception of a puzzling sort emerging from cases of fantasizing and imagining, found in Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Flaubert's Madame Bovary. The author is particularly interested in what can be described as the ‘divided mind of self‐deception’, the mind that produces an imagination due to its realising the state of the world that motivates the fantasy construct and the possessor's eventual acquisition (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   93 citations  
  12.  34
    The Structure and Content of Truth.Donald Davidson - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (6):279.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   173 citations  
  13. The Structure and Content of Truth.Donald Davidson - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (6):279-328.
  14.  99
    Problems of Rationality.Donald Davidson - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Problems of Rationality is the eagerly awaited fourth volume of Donald Davidson 's philosophical writings. From the 1960s until his death in August 2003 Davidson was perhaps the most influential figure in English-language philosophy, and his work has had a profound effect upon the discipline. His unified theory of the interpretation of thought, meaning, and action holds that rationality is a necessary condition for both mind and interpretation. Davidson here develops this theory to illuminate value judgements and how we understand (...)
  15. The Logical Form of Action Sentences.Donald Davidson - 1967 - In Nicholas Rescher (ed.), The Logic of Decision and Action. University of Pittsburgh Press.
  16. Radical Interpretation.Donald Davidson - 1973 - Dialectica 27 (1):314-328.
  17. Rational Animals.Donald Davidson - 1982 - Dialectica 36 (4):317-28.
    SummaryNeither an infant one week old nor a snail is a rational creature. If the infant survives long enough, he will probably become rational, while this is not true of the snail. If we like, we may say of the infant from the start that he is a rational creature because he will probably become rational if he survives, or because he belongs to a species with this capacity. Whichever way we talk, there remains the difference, with respect to rationality, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   178 citations  
  18. Thought and Talk.Donald Davidson - 1975 - In Samuel D. Guttenplan (ed.), Mind and Language. Clarendon Press. pp. 1975--7.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   206 citations  
  19. First Person Authority.Donald Davidson - 1984 - Dialectica 38 (2‐3):101-112.
  20.  65
    Truth and Predication.Donald Davidson - 2005
  21. Truth and Meaning.Donald Davidson - 1967 - Synthese 17 (1):304-323.
  22. Causal Relations.Donald Davidson - 1967 - Journal of Philosophy 64 (21):691-703.
  23. Essays on Actions and Events: Philosophical Essays Volume 1.Donald Davidson - 2001 - Clarendon Press.
    Donald Davidson has prepared a new edition of his classic 1980 collection of Essays on Actions and Events, including two additional essays. In this seminal investigation of the nature of human action, Davidson argues for an ontology which includes events along with persons and other objects. Certain events are identified and explained as actions when they are viewed as caused and rationalized by reasons; these same events, when described in physical, biological, or physiological terms, may be explained by appeal to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  24. A Nice Derangement of Epitaphs.Donald Davidson - 1986 - In Ernest Lepore (ed.), Truth and Interpretation: Perspectives on the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. Blackwell. pp. 433--446.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   129 citations  
  25. The Mind of Donald Davidson.Donald Davidson - 1989 - Netherlands: Rodopi.
  26. Subjective, Intersubjective, Objective.Donald Davidson - 1996 - In Philosophy. Bristol: Thoemmes. pp. 555-558.
    This is the long-awaited third volume of philosophical writings by Davidson, whose influence on philosophy since the 1960s has been deep and broad. His first two collections, published by Oxford in the early 1980s, are recognized as contemporary classics. His ideas have continued to flow; now, in this new work, he presents a selection of his best work on knowledge, mind, and language from the last two decades. It is a rich and rewarding feast for anyone interested in philosophy, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   92 citations  
  27. Truth and Meaning.Donald Davidson - 1967 - Synthese 17 (1):304-323.
  28.  16
    Essays on Actions and Events.Donald Davidson - 1980 - Ethics 93 (3):608-611.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   162 citations  
  29. Inquiries Into Truth and Interpretation: Philosophical Essays Volume 2.Donald Davidson - 2001 - Clarendon Press.
    Donald Davidson presents a new edition of the 1984 volume which set out his enormously influential philosophy of language. Inquiries into Truth and Interpretation has been a central point of reference and a focus of controversy in the subject ever since, and its influence has extended into linguistic theory, philosophy of mind, and epistemology. The central question which these essays address is what it is for words to mean what they do. This new edition features an additional essay, previously uncollected.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  30. How Is Weakness of the Will Possible?Donald Davidson - 1969 - In Joel Feinberg (ed.), Moral Concepts. Oxford University Press.
    D. In doing x an agent acts incontinently if and only if: 1) the agent does x intentionally; 2) the agent believes there is an alternative action y open to him; and 3) the agent judges that, all things considered, it would be better to do y than to do x.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   108 citations  
  31. The Emergence of Thought.Donald Davidson - 1999 - Erkenntnis 51 (1):511-521.
    A phenomenon “emerges” when a concept is instantiated for the first time: hence emergence is relative to a set of concepts. Propositional thought and language emerge together. It is proposed that the degree of complexity of an object language relative to a given metalanguage can be gauged by the number of ways it can be translated into that metalanguage: in analogy with other forms of measurement, the more ways the object language can be translated into the metalanguage, the less powerful (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   57 citations  
  32.  10
    Radical Interpretation.Donald Davidson - 1973 - Dialectica 27 (3-4):313-328.
  33. Thinking Causes.Donald Davidson - 1992 - In John Heil & Alfred R. Mele (eds.), Mental Causation. Oxford University Press. pp. 1993--3.
  34.  24
    The Folly of Trying to Define Truth.Donald Davidson - 1996 - Journal of Philosophy 93 (6):263-278.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   69 citations  
  35. Paradoxes of Irrationality.Donald Davidson - 1982 - In Problems of Rationality. Oxford University Press.
    The author believes that large‐scale rationality on the part of the interpretant is essential to his interpretability, and therefore, in his view, to her having a mind. How, then are cases of irrationality, such as akrasia or self‐deception, judged by the interpretant's own standards, possible? He proposes that, in order to resolve the apparent paradoxes, one must distinguish between accepting a contradictory proposition and accepting separately each of two contradictory propositions, which are held apart, which in turn requires to conceive (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   92 citations  
  36. The Individuation of Events.Donald Davidson - 1969 - In Nicholas Rescher (ed.), Essays in Honor of Carl G. Hempel. Reidel. pp. 216-34.
  37.  22
    What Metaphors Mean.Donald Davidson - 2013 - In Maite Ezcurdia & Robert J. Stainton (eds.), The Semantics-Pragmatics Boundary in Philosophy. Broadview Press. pp. 453-465.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  38. Knowing One's Own Mind.Donald Davidson - 2003 - In John Heil (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: A Guide and Anthology. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  39. Belief and the Basis of Meaning.Donald Davidson - 1974 - Synthese 27 (July-August):309-323.
    A theory of radical interpretation gives the meanings of all sentences of a language, and can be verified by evidence available to someone who does not understand the language. Such evidence cannot include detailed information concerning the beliefs and intentions of speakers, and therefore the theory must simultaneously interpret the utterances of speakers and specify (some of) his beliefs. Analogies and connections with decision theory suggest the kind of theory that will serve for radical interpretation, and how permissible evidence can (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   106 citations  
  40. The Folly of Trying to Define Truth.Donald Davidson - 1996 - Journal of Philosophy 93 (6):263-278.
  41. Three Varieties of Knowledge.Donald Davidson - 1991 - In A. Phillips Griffiths (ed.), Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 153-166.
    I know, for the most part, what I think, want, and intend, and what my sensations are. In addition, I know a great deal about the world around me. I also sometimes know what goes on in other people's minds. Each of these three kinds of empirical knowledge has its distinctive characteristics. What I know about the contents of my own mind I generally know without investigation or appeal to evidence. There are exceptions, but the primacy of unmediated self-knowledge is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   66 citations  
  42. The Social Aspect of Language.Donald Davidson - 1994 - In Brian McGuiness & Gianluigi Oliveri (eds.), The Philosophy of Michael Dummett. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 1--16.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations  
  43. Freedom to Act.Donald Davidson - 1973 - In Ted Honderich (ed.), Essays on Freedom of Action. Routledge.
  44. The Second Person.Donald Davidson - 1992 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 17 (1):255-267.
  45. Psychology as Philosophy.Donald Davidson - 1974 - In S. Brown (ed.), Philosophy of Psychology. Harper & Row.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   87 citations  
  46.  37
    Epistemology Externalized.Donald Davidson - 1991 - Dialectica 45 (2‐3):191-202.
    SummaryStarting with Descartes, epistemology has been almost entirely based on first person knowledge. We must begin, according to the usual story, with what is most certain: knowledge of our own sensations and thoughts. In one way or another we then progress, if we can, to knowledge of an objective external world. There is then the final, tenuous, step to knowledge of other minds.In this paper I argue for a total revision of this picture. All propositional thought, whether positive or skeptical, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations  
  47. True to the Facts.Donald Davidson - 1969 - Journal of Philosophy 66 (21):748-764.
  48.  52
    What Metaphors Mean.Donald Davidson - 1978 - Critical Inquiry 5 (1):31-47.
    The concept of metaphor as primarily a vehicle for conveying ideas, even if unusual ones, seems to me as wrong as the parent idea that a metaphor has a special meaning. I agree with the view that metaphors cannot be paraphrased, but I think this is not because metaphors say something too novel for literal expression but because there is nothing there to paraphrase. Paraphrase, whether possible or not, inappropriate to what is said: we try, in paraphrase, to say it (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   73 citations  
  49. Intending.Donald Davidson - 1978 - Philosophy of History and Action 11:41-60.
    Someone may intend to build a squirrel house without having decided to do it, deliberated about it, formed an intention to do it, or reasoned about it. And despite his intention, he may never build a squirrel house, try to build one, or do anything whatever with the intention of getting a squirrel house built. Pure intending of this kind, intending that may occur without practical reasoning, action, or consequence, poses a problem if we want to give an account of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   62 citations  
  50. Communication and Convention.Donald Davidson - 1984 - Synthese 59 (1):3 - 17.
1 — 50 / 226