4 found
Order:
  1.  6
    Expanding Opportunity Structures.Dawn B. Neill - 2010 - Human Nature 21 (2):165-185.
    Parental investment strategies are contingent on parental capacities and ecology. Parental embodied capital may be important in aspiration construction and investments in children’s human capital, which is especially important in urban environments where skills are directly tied to wage income. For Indo-Fijians, rural ecology strongly limits opportunities. Here this limitation is conceptualized as extrinsic risk and immune to reduction through enhanced parental investment. Urban migration is interpreted as a risk reduction strategy, given an expanded urban opportunity structure (lower extrinsic risk). (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  12
    Urbanization and Daughter-Biased Parental Investment in Fiji.Dawn B. Neill - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (1-2):139-155.
    Parental investment decisions guide parental actions regarding children’s productive work and are shaped by ecological context. Urban ecology enhances long-term payoffs to investment in human capital, increasing opportunity costs for work performed by children, and decreased workload should result. Using an embodied capital framework, self-reported data on urban and rural Indo-Fijian children’s work activities are compared. Results show higher workloads for older children, rural children, and girls. High scholastic achievement is associated with lower workloads for girls, but not boys. This (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  6
    Indo-Fijian Children’s BMI.Dawn B. Neill - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (3):209-224.
    Health research has shown that overweight and obesity in children and adults are becoming significant public health problems in the developing world. Evidence suggests that this phenomenon is more marked in urban than rural areas and may be associated with modernization. However, the underlying reasons for this nutrition transition remain unclear. Dietary shifts, often in conjunction with income and time constraints in urban environments, may entail a greater reliance on more convenient sugar and fat-dense food. Also, the necessity of labor-intensive (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  8
    Extrinsic Risk.Dawn B. Neill - 2010 - Human Nature 21 (2):99-102.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark