Results for 'De-Extinction'

979 found
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  1.  82
    Considering De-Extinction: Zombie Arguments and the Walking (And Flying and Swimming) Dead.Eric Katz - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (2):81-103.
    De-extinction raises anew ontological and epistemological problems that have engaged environmental philosophers for decades. This essay re-examines these issues to provide a fuller understanding—and a critique—of de-extinction. One of my claims is that de-extinction as a philosophical problem merely recycles old issues and debates in the field (hence, “zombie” arguments). De-extinction is a project that arises out of the assertion of human domination of the natural world. Thus the acceptance of de-extinction as an environmental policy (...)
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  2.  83
    De-extinction as Artificial Species Selection.Derek D. Turner - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (4):395-411.
    This paper offers a paleobiological perspective on the debate concerning the possible use of biotechnology to bring back extinct species. One lesson from paleobiology is that extinction selectivity matters in addition to extinction rates and extinction magnitude. Combining some of Darwin’s insights about artificial selection with the theory of species selection that paleobiologists developed in the 1970s and 1980s provides a useful context for thinking about de-extinction. Using recent work on the prioritization of candidate species for (...)
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  3.  27
    De-extinction and Conservation Genetics in the Anthropocene.Ronald Sandler - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (S2):S43-S47.
    One interesting feature of de‐extinction—particularly with respect to long‐extinct species such as the passenger pigeon, thylacine, and mammoth—is that it does not fit neatly into the primary rationales for adopting novel ecosystem‐management and species‐conservation technologies and strategies: efficiency and necessity. The efficiency rationale is that the new technology or strategy enables conservation biologists to do what they already do more effectively. Why should researchers embrace novel information technologies? Because they allow scientists to better track, monitor, map, aggregate, and analyze (...)
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  4. The Ethics of De-Extinction.Shlomo Cohen - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (2):165-178.
    “de-extinction” refers to the process of resurrecting extinct species by genetic methods. This science-fiction-sounding idea is in fact already in early processes of scientific implementation. Although this recent “revival of the dead” raises deep ethical questions, the ethics of de-extinction has barely received philosophical treatment. Rather than seeking a verdict for or against de-extinction, this paper attempts an overview and some novel analyses of the main ethical considerations. Five dimensions of the ethics of de-extinction are explored: (...)
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  5.  34
    De-extinction and the Flourishing of Species.Ian A. Smith - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):38-40.
    T.J. Kasperbauer argues that the most pressing problem for de-extinction is that it implies significant suffering for sentient animals. Though it is true that de-extinction entails suffering for se...
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  6.  7
    De-extinction and Barriers to the Application of New Conservation Tools.Philip J. Seddon - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (S2):S5-S8.
    Decades of globally coordinated work in conservation have failed to slow the loss of biodiversity. To do better—even if that means nothing more than failing less spectacularly—bolder thinking is necessary. One of the first possible conservation applications of synthetic biology to be debated is the use of genetic tools to resurrect once‐extinct species. Since the currency of conservation is biodiversity and the discipline of conservation biology was formed around the prevention of species extinctions, the prospect of reversing extinctions might have (...)
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  7.  36
    The Unnaturalness Objection to De-Extinction: A Critical Evaluation.Carolyn Mason - 2017 - Animal Studies Journal 6 (1):40-60.
    The Unnaturalness Objection to De-Extinction: A Critical Evaluation Carolyn Mason, University of Canterbury, New Zealand Abstract De-extinction of species has been criticised for being unnatural, as have the techniques that might be used to accomplish de-extinction. This objection of unnaturalness will be dismissed by those who claim that everything that humans do is natural, by those who claim that naturalness is a social construct, and by those who argue that ethical concerns arising from considerations of unnaturalness rest (...)
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  8. De-extinction and the conception of species.Leonard Finkelman - 2018 - Biology and Philosophy 33 (5-6):32.
    Developments in genetic engineering may soon allow biologists to clone organisms from extinct species. The process, dubbed “de-extinction,” has been publicized as a means to bring extinct species back to life. For theorists and philosophers of biology, the process also suggests a thought experiment for the ongoing “species problem”: given a species concept, would a clone be classified in the extinct species? Previous analyses have answered this question in the context of specific de-extinction technologies or particular species concepts. (...)
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  9.  42
    De-extinction and Deep Questions About Species Conservation.Christian Diehm - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):25-28.
    T. J. Kasperbauer presents an analysis of the ethics of de-extinction that is fairly distinctive in its focus on the welfare of individual animals. But while he is right to express concerns about individual animal well-being, individualism may not be the most important lens through which to view this issue. If one examines more closely what is at issue in de-extinction technologies in relation to species, additional problems appear that cast doubt both on the legitimacy of de-extinction (...)
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  10. On the Authenticity of De-Extinct Organisms, and the Genesis Argument.Douglas Campbell - 2017 - Animal Studies Journal 6 (1):61-79.
    Are the methods of synthetic biology capable of recreating authentic living members of an extinct species? An analogy with the restoration of destroyed natural landscapes suggests not. The restored version of a natural landscape will typically lack much of the aesthetic value of the original landscape because of the different historical processes that created it—processes that involved human intentions and actions, rather than natural forces acting over millennia. By the same token, it would appear that synthetically recreated versions of extinct (...)
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  11.  18
    Is De-extinction Special?Henry T. Greely - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (S2):S30-S36.
    I have been involved with the current interest in de‐extinction since early 2012, nearly its beginning. I have given a lot of thought to the potential risks and benefits of de‐extinction. But only recently, after deep immersion in discussions around CRISPR‐Cas9, the hottest new tool in bioscience since polymerase chain reaction, have I thought about a more fundamental question: how, if at all, is de‐extinction special? Are “revived species” just another kind of genetically modified organism, raising essentially (...)
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  12. Won’t Somebody Please Think of the Mammoths? De-extinction and Animal Welfare.Heather Browning - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (6):785-803.
    De-extinction is the process through which extinct species can be brought back into existence. Although these projects have the potential to cause great harm to animal welfare, discussion on issues surrounding de-extinction have focussed primarily on other issues. In this paper, I examine the potential types of welfare harm that can arise through de-extinction programs, including problems with cloning, captive rearing and re-introduction. I argue that welfare harm should be an important consideration when making decisions on de- (...) projects. Though most of the proposed benefits of these projects are insufficient to outweigh the current potential welfare harm, these problems may be overcome with further development of the technology and careful selection of appropriate species as de-extinction candidates. (shrink)
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  13.  32
    Using De-extinction to Create Extinct Species Proxies; Natural History not Included.Patrice Kohl - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):15-17.
    Authors sometimes treat the promise of de-extinction as a forgone conclusion. But if we take Kasperbauer’s approach and assess the moral acceptability of de-extinction by weighting benefits to species against the suffering of individuals, the promise of de-extinction deserves greater critical attention. Accepting de-extinct individuals as replacements for extinct predecessors assumes species are separate from environment and can be reduced to DNA. In this response to Kasperbauer’s essay, I examine how the acceptability of de-extinction might shift (...)
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  14.  26
    De-extinction and Taking Control of Earth's “Metabolism”.Christopher J. Preston - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (S2):S37-S42.
    In a laboratory on a university campus in Santa Cruz, California, Ben Novak is doing everything he can to bring Ectopistes migratorius back from the dead. Using techniques now available in genome reading and gene synthesis, he and paleogenomicist Beth Shapiro hope that, by 2032, a flock of passenger pigeons ten thousand or more strong will have resumed an ecologically significant role in the mast forests of the Eastern United States. Novak knows—and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) (...)
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  15.  30
    De-extinction and Conservation.Gregory E. Kaebnick & Bruce Jennings - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (S2):S2-S4.
    We are living in what is widely considered the sixth major extinction. Most ecologists believe that biodiversity is disappearing at an alarming rate, with up to 150 species going extinct per day according to scientists working with the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. Part of the reason the loss signified by biological extinction feels painful is that it seems irremediable. These creatures are gone, and there's nothing to be done about it. In recent years, however, the possibility (...)
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  16.  25
    Aesthetics at the Intersection of the Species Problem and De-Extinction Technology.Michael Aaron Lindquist - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (5):605-624.
    De-extinction technology aims to bring extinct species back into existence, often with the goal of releasing created organisms into natural environments. In this paper, I argue that there are aesthetic reasons to avoid engaging in de-extinction and release projects, even if they pass moral permissibility criteria. The strength of these reasons depends on conclusions regarding species authenticity - a problem that arises at the intersection of de-extinction technology and the 'species problem' in the philosophy of biology. Since (...)
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  17.  80
    The Extinction and De-Extinction of Species.Helena Siipi & Leonard Finkelman - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (4):427-441.
    In this paper, we discuss the following four alternative ways of understanding the outcomes of resurrection biology. Implications of each of the ways are discussed with respect to concepts of species and extinction. Replication: animals created by resurrection biology do not belong to the original species but are copies of it. The view is compatible with finality of extinction as well as with certain biological and ecological species concepts. Re-creation: animals created are members of the original species but, (...)
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  18.  21
    Authenticity and Autonomy in De-Extinction.Christopher Hunter Lean - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (2):116-120.
    Eric Katz in Zombie Arguments defends the thesis authenticity is indispensable to conservation. I agree. However, I argue authenticity appears in degrees and can be reclaimed by populations through their continuing evolutionary responses to the world. This means that interventions that diminish the value of a population through reducing their authenticity can be permitted in limited cases. When our actions retain the remaining authentic features in a threatened population we should allow such a diminishment as authenticity can be reclaimed in (...)
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  19.  13
    Can the Zillo Beast Strike Back? Cloning, De‐extinction, and the Species Problem.Leonard Finkelman - 2015-09-18 - In Jason T. Eberl & Kevin S. Decker (eds.), The Ultimate Star Wars and Philosophy. Wiley. pp. 250–260.
    This chapter commences with an account on the Zillo Beasts. The reawakening of extinct species, or "de‐extinction," has gained massive popular appeal. The chapter explains some facts before delving into the philosophical debate over de‐extinction. Philosophers sometimes use far‐fetched examples to answer the questions that are left after we agree on all the facts. These “thought experiments” are meant to show us what we really believe. What makes a duck a duck, a mammoth a mammoth, or a Zillo (...)
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  20.  16
    De-extinction and the Community of Being.Curt Meine - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (S2):S9-S17.
    Extinction deeply colors the way we think about conservation and the role of humans in nature. It is easy to overlook how recently, in fact, it has entered our consciousness. Only in the last two centuries has science sought to critically study life's origins, development, and diversification. Only in the last several generations have we identified and calibrated life's five major extinction events and speculated on their causes and effects. And only in recent decades have we come to (...)
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  21.  71
    An Analysis of Potential Ethical Justifications for Mammoth De-extinction And a Call for Empirical Research.Yasha Rohwer & Emma Marris - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):127-142.
    We argue that the de-extinction of the mammoth cannot be ethically grounded by duties to the extinct mammoth, to ecosystem health or to individual organisms in ecosystems missing the mammoth. However, the action can be shown to be morally permissible via the goods it will afford humans, including advances in scientific knowledge, valuable experiences of awe and pleasure, and perhaps improvements to our moral character or behaviour—if and only if suffering is minimal. Finally, we call for empirical research into (...)
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  22.  19
    Deflating the De-Extinction Debates: Domination and Artifactuality are Not the Problem.Thomas A. C. Reydon - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (2):113-115.
    In his article, Considering de-extinction, Katz (2022) mounts a two-pronged criticism of de-extinction efforts as elements of environmental policy. First, Katz argues that there is no positive case...
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  23. A case for resurrecting lost species—review essay of Beth Shapiro’s, “How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-extinction”.Douglas Campbell - 2016 - Biology and Philosophy 31 (5):747-759.
    The title of Beth Shapiro’s ‘How to Clone a Mammoth’ contains an implicature: it suggests that it is indeed possible to clone a mammoth, to bring extinct species back from the dead. But in fact Shapiro both denies this is possible, and denies there would be good reason to do it even if it were possible. The de-extinct ‘mammoths’ she speaks of are merely ecological proxies for mammoths—elephants re-engineered for cold-tolerance by the addition to their genomes of a few mammoth (...)
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  24. A pragmatic approach to the possibility of de-extinction.Matthew H. Slater & Hayley Clatterbuck - 2018 - Biology and Philosophy 33 (1-2):4.
    A number of influential biologists are currently pursuing efforts to restore previously extinct species. But for decades, philosophers of biology have regarded “de-extinction” as conceptually incoherent. Once a species is gone, it is gone forever. We argue that a range of metaphysical, biological, and ethical grounds for opposing de-extinction are at best inconclusive and that a pragmatic stance that allows for its possibility is more appealing.
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  25.  19
    The Moral Imagination of De-extinction.Bruce Jennings - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (S2):S54-S59.
    We are living in what is widely considered the sixth major extinction. Most ecologists believe that biodiversity is disappearing at an alarming rate, with up to 150 species going extinct per day according to scientists working with the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. Part of the reason the loss signified by biological extinction feels painful is that it seems irremediable. These creatures are gone, and there's nothing to be done about it. In recent years, however, the possibility (...)
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  26.  52
    Biases in the Selection of Candidate Species for De-Extinction.Derek D. Turner - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):21-24.
    Entrenched biases in favour of large, charismatic mammals, towards predators, towards terrestrial animals and towards species that have cultural importance can influence the selection of candidate species for de-extinction research. Often, the species with the highest existence value will also be the ones that raise the most serious animal welfare concerns.
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  27. A posthumanist critique of de-extinction science.Sarah Bezan - 2022 - In Danielle Sands (ed.), Bioethics and the Posthumanities. New York, NY: Routledge.
     
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  28. More Than Zombies: Considering the Animal Subject in De-Extinction.Heather Browning & Walter Veit - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (2):121-124.
    Katz (2022) provides a range of arguments drawn from the environmental philosophy literature to criticize the conceptualisation and practice of de-extinction. The discussion is almost completely de...
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  29.  92
    Ethical Arguments For and Against De-extinction.Douglas Ian Campbell & Patrick Michael Whittle - 2017 - In Douglas Ian Campbell & Patrick Michael Whittle (eds.), Resurrecting Extinct Species: Ethics and Authenticity. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 87-124.
    This chapter surveys and critically evaluates all the main arguments both for and against de-extinction. It presents a qualified defence of the claim that conservationists should embrace de-extinction. It ends with a list of do’s and don’ts for conservationist de-extinction projects.
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  30.  46
    Eric Katz on ”De-Extinction”: Ontology, Value and Normativity.Ronald Sandler, Espen Dyrnes Stabell, Ryan Baylon, Cora Lundgren, Philine Weisbeek, Benjamin Yelle & Markus Zaba - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (2):104-108.
    Eric Katz (1992) influentially argued that ecological restoration involves the ‘big lie’ that a successful restoration re-establishes or re-creates all of what was lost through human degradation, a...
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  31.  21
    The Spectacular Garden: Where Might De-extinction Lead?.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (S2):S60-S64.
    The emergence of de‐extinction is a study in technological optimism. What has already been accomplished in recovering ancient genomes, recreating them, and reproducing animals with engineered genomes is amazing but also has a long ways to go to achieve “de‐extinction” as most people would understand that term. Still, with some caveats in place, creating a functional replacement for an extinct species may sometimes be doable, and given the right goals, might sometimes make sense. The International Union for Conservation (...)
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  32.  37
    Why Wake the Dead? Identity and De-extinction.Christopher Hunter Lean - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (3):571-589.
    I will entertain and reject three arguments which putatively establish that the individuals produced through de-extinction ought to be the same species as the extinct population. Forms of these arguments have appeared previously in restoration ecology. The first is the weakest, the conceptual argument, that de-extinction will not be de-extinction if it does not re-create an extinct species. This is misguided as de-extinction technology is not unified by its aim to re-create extinct species but in its (...)
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  33. Should We Bring Back the Passenger Pigeon? The Ethics of De-Extinction.T. J. Kasperbauer - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):1-14.
    Recent advances in synthetic biology have made it possible to revive extinct species of animals, a process known as ‘de-extinction’. This paper examines two reasons for supporting de-extinction: the potential for de-extinct species to play useful roles in ecosystems; and human valuing of certain de-extinct species. I focus on the particular case of passenger pigeons to argue that the most critical challenge for de-extinction is that it entails significant suffering for sentient individual animals. I also provide reasons (...)
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  34.  22
    De-scenting Extinction: The Promise of De-extinction May Hasten Continuing Extinctions.Claudio Campagna, Daniel Guevara & Bernard Le Boeuf - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (S2):S48-S53.
    Among the most egregious and discouraging problems of conservation is the rapidly escalating human‐caused species extinction rate. “De‐extinction” refers to the application of certain cutting‐edge techniques for the supposed recovery of lost species and gives the impression that scientists, enlightened and empowered by the miracles of technology, are coming to the rescue. “De‐extinction” is the latest example of a long play of language that has given conservation efforts a tragically false sense of accomplishment and has worsened the (...)
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  35.  21
    Extinction of likes and dislikes: effects of feature-specific attention allocation.Jolien Vanaelst, Adriaan Spruyt, Tom Everaert & Jan De Houwer - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (8):1595-1609.
    The evaluative conditioning effect refers to the change in the liking of a neutral stimulus due to its pairing with another stimulus. We examined whether the extinction rate of the EC effect is moderated by feature-specific attention allocation. In two experiments, CSs were abstract Gabor patches varying along two orthogonal, perceptual dimensions. During the acquisition phase, one of these dimensions was predictive of the valence of the USs. During the extinction phase, CSs were presented alone and participants were (...)
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  36.  22
    The Ontology of Species: Commentary on Kasperbauer’s ‘Should We Bring Back the Passenger Pigeon? The Ethics of De-Extinction’.Jonathan Beever - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):18-20.
    Beneath important ethical questions about the impacts of de-extinct species on ecosystems and the potential harms to individual organisms lies a more fundamental assumption; namely, that the thing being "de-extinct-ed" is indeed a member of previously existing species. This is the ontological assumption: that genetic make-up of the individual is both a necessary and sufficient condition for species membership. Questioning this ontological assumption poses an even more critical challenge for de-extinction. Genes a member of a species do not make. (...)
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  37.  33
    We Can’t Bring Back the Passenger Pigeon: The Ethics of Deception Around De-extinction.David E. Blockstein - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):33-37.
    There is much hype around the idea of bringing the Passenger Pigeon back from extinction. However, ‘de-extinction’ is a fantasy that is not grounded in science. The proposed plans for ‘de-extinction’ would create a new organism that is not likely to be viable in the wild. Thus, ‘de-extinction’ as proposed is unethical both because it could lead into the release in nature of a new genetically created organism and because it is not honest to claim that (...)
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  38.  38
    Secondary extinction correction in the Laue case.J. J. De Marco, M. Diana & G. Mazzone - 1967 - Philosophical Magazine 16 (144):1303-1306.
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  39.  16
    Conservation Genetics, Precision Conservation, and De-extinction.Rob Desalle & George Amato - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (S2):S18-S23.
    It has been estimated that three species on the planet now go extinct every hour and that this rate is orders of magnitude higher than the planet has seen in previous catastrophic extinction events. We clearly are in the midst of a sixth extinction, and this one is different from the previous five. Why? This sixth extinction is caused by the activity of a single species—us. If there is any hope of ameliorating this extinction, it will (...)
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  40.  28
    Belief bias and the extinction of induced fear.Maartje S. Vroling & Peter J. de Jong - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (8):1405-1420.
  41.  5
    A study of Babylonian planetary theory III. The planet Mercury.Teije de Jong - 2021 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 75 (5):491-522.
    In this series of papers I attempt to provide an answer to the question how the Babylonian scholars arrived at their mathematical theory of planetary motion. Papers I and II were devoted to system A theory of the outer planets and of the planet Venus. In this third and last paper I will study system A theory of the planet Mercury. Our knowledge of the Babylonian theory of Mercury is at present based on twelveEphemeridesand sevenProcedure Texts. Three computational systems of (...)
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  42.  4
    A philosophy of crisis.Miguel de Beistegui - 2024 - London: University of Chicago Press.
    Not a day goes by that we don't hear of a crisis, declared or looming: the ecological crisis, the public health crisis, the housing crisis, the race crisis, the constitutional crisis, the economic crisis. In an age where everything seems to be a crisis, or in a permanent state of crisis, it can be difficult to distinguish between what is urgent and what isn't, what to act on now and what to act on later. In A Philosophy of Crisis, Miguel (...)
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  43. Can the zillo beast strike back? : cloning, de-extinction, and the species problem.Leonard Finkelman - 2015 - In Jason T. Eberl & Kevin S. Decker (eds.), The Ultimate Star Wars and Philosophy: You Must Unlearn What You Have Learned. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  44.  38
    Is evaluative conditioning really resistant to extinction? Evidence for changes in evaluative judgements without changes in evaluative representations.Bertram Gawronski, Anne Gast & Jan De Houwer - 2015 - Cognition and Emotion 29 (5):816-830.
  45.  66
    Should Extinction Be Forever?Karim Jebari - 2016 - Philosophy and Technology 29 (3):211-222.
    This article will explore a problem which is related to our moral obligations towards species. Although the re-creation of extinct animals has been discussed to some degree both in lay deliberations as well as by scientists, advocates tend to emphasize the technological and scientific value of such an endeavour, and the “coolness” factor, 32–33, 2013). This article will provide an argument in favour of re-creation based on normative considerations. The environmentalist community generally accepts that it is wrong to exterminate species, (...)
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  46. The ethics of species extinctions.Anna Wienhues, Patrik Baard, Alfonso Donoso & Markku Oksanen - 2023 - Cambridge Prisms: Extinction 1 (e23):1–15.
    This review provides an overview of the ethics of extinctions with a focus on the Western analytical environmental ethics literature. It thereby gives special attention to the possible philosophical grounds for Michael Soulé’s assertion that the untimely ‘extinction of populations and species is bad’. Illustrating such debates in environmental ethics, the guiding question for this review concerns why – or when – anthropogenic extinctions are bad or wrong, which also includes the question of when that might not be the (...)
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  47.  88
    Resurrecting Extinct Species: Ethics and Authenticity.Douglas Ian Campbell & Patrick Michael Whittle - 2017 - London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. Edited by Patrick Michael Whittle.
    This book is about the philosophy of de-extinction. -/- CHAPTER 1 introduces the two main philosophical questions that are raised by the prospect of extinct species being brought back from the dead—namely, the ‘Authenticity Question’ and the ‘Ethical Question’. It distinguishes the many different types and methods of de-extinction. Finally, it examines the aims of wildlife conservation with a view to whether they are compatible with de-extinction, or not. -/- CHAPTER 2 examines three prime candidates for de- (...)—namely, the aurochs, the woolly mammoth, and the passenger pigeon. It is about what these animals were like, why people want to resurrect them, and the methods by which their resurrections could be accomplished. -/- CHAPTER 3 is about the authenticity of de-extinct animals. Critics of de-extinction have offered many reasons for thinking that the products of de-extinction will be inauthentic. The bulk of the chapter is taken up with surveying their arguments. We attempt to show that none are convincing, and end the chapter by offering and defending two arguments in favour of the view that authentic de-extinctions are possible. -/- CHAPTER 4 surveys and critically evaluates all the main arguments both for and against de-extinction. It presents a qualified defence of the claim that conservationists should embrace de-extinction. It ends with a list of do’s and don’ts for conservationist de-extinction projects. (shrink)
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  48.  9
    Du matérialiste crasse au fondateur de la psychophysiologie : la réception de Cabanis outre-Rhin (1801-1870).Ronan de Calan - 2020 - Cahiers de Philosophie de L’Université de Caen 57:117-130.
    L’œuvre de Cabanis a eu énormément de mal à sortir d’une place qui lui était prescrite au moment même de son inscription dans le champ philosophique et scientifique allemand. Cette place, c’est celle de continuateur audacieux, informé, d’un projet lui-même daté : le projet d’une anthropologie physiologique, dont on estimait que les limites en avaient d’emblée été fixées par Kant et qu’en conséquence il n’était pas voué à un grand avenir. Pendant un demi-siècle environ, l’œuvre philosophique de Cabanis, limitée ici (...)
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  49.  12
    Signals for threat modulate attentional capture and holding: Fear-conditioning and extinction during the exogenous cueing task.Ernst Koster, Geert Crombez, Stefaan Van Damme, Bruno Verschuere & Jan De Houwer - 2005 - Cognition and Emotion 19 (5):771-780.
  50.  8
    A study of Babylonian planetary theory II. The planet Venus.Teije de Jong - 2019 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 73 (4):309-333.
    In this series of papers, I attempt to provide an answer to the question how the Babylonian scholars arrived at their mathematical theory of planetary motion. Paper I (de Jong in Arch Hist Exact Sci 73:1–37, 2019) was devoted to a study of system A theory of the outer planets. In this second paper, I will study system A theory of the planet Venus. All presently known ephemerides of Venus appear to have been written after 200 BC so that the (...)
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