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  1.  28
    The Difficulties of Hobbes Interpretation.Deborah Baumgold - 2008 - Political Theory 36 (6):827-855.
    Idiosyncrasies of Hobbes's composition process, together with a paucity of reliable autobiographical materials and the norms of seventeenth-century manuscript production, render interpretation of his political theory particularly difficult and contentious. These difficulties are surveyed here under three headings: the process of "serial" composition, which was common in the period; the relationship between Hobbes's three political-theory texts-- the "Elements of Law, De Cive ", and "Leviathan", which is basic to defining the textual embodiment of his theory, and controversial; and his method (...)
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  2.  55
    Hobbes's Political Theory.Deborah Baumgold - 1988 - Cambridge University Press.
    Chapter Introduction Hobbes's political doctrine presents the unusual feature that it has given rise to an "official" interpretation, in terms of which, ...
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  3.  10
    Composition of Hobbess Elements of Law, The.Deborah Baumgold - 2004 - History of Political Thought 25 (1):16-43.
    Hobbes claimed to have written the The Elements of Law during the Short Parliament of the spring of 1640. However, it seems unlikely that such a lengthy, systematic treatise could have been composed in so short a time. This article closely examines the text to make the case that the bulk of it was written prior to the 1640 political crisis. What was probably written that spring were chapters defending absolutism. Their hurried composition accounts in particular for the odd assertion (...)
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  4.  71
    Hobbes’s and Locke’s Contract Theories: Political Not Metaphysical.Deborah Baumgold - 2005 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (3):289-308.
    Abstract Inspired by Rawls?s admission that his twentieth?century contract theory builds in the parochial horizon of modern constitutional democracy, this essay critically examines two truisms about seventeenth?century contract theory. The first is the stock view that the English case is irrelevant to the logic of Leviathan and the Second Treatise. To the contrary, I argue that their political conclusions depend on introducing constitutional and legal ?facts?, in particular, facts about the constitution of the English monarchy. Second, I challenge the Whiggish (...)
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  5.  2
    Pacifying Politics.Deborah Baumgold - 1993 - Political Theory 21 (1):6-27.
  6. Subjects and Soldiers: Hobbes on Military Service.Deborah Baumgold - 1983 - History of Political Thought 4 (1):43-64.
  7. Hobbes.Deborah Baumgold - 2003 - In David Boucher & P. J. Kelly (eds.), Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present. Oxford University Press. pp. 163--180.
     
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  8.  94
    Ross Harrison, Hobbes, Locke, and Confusion's Masterpiece (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), Pp. 281.Deborah Baumgold - 2005 - Utilitas 17 (3):348-349.
  9. Hobbe's Political Theory.Deborah Baumgold - 1990 - Ethics 100 (2):421-422.
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  10.  32
    “Trust” in Hobbes’s Political Thought.Deborah Baumgold - 2013 - Political Theory 41 (6):0090591713499764.
    “Trust” is not usually considered a Hobbesian concept, which is odd since it is central to the definition of a covenant. The key to understanding Hobbes’s concept of trust is to be found in his account of conquest— “sovereignty by acquisition”—which is a heavily revised adaptation of the Roman justification of slavery. Hobbes introduces a distinction between servants, who are trusted with liberty, and imprisoned slaves. The servant/master relationship involves mutual trust, an ongoing exchange of benefits (protection for service and (...)
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  11. When Hobbes Needed History.Deborah Baumgold - 2000 - In G. A. J. Rogers & Tom Sorell (eds.), Hobbes and History. Routledge. pp. 25--43.
     
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  12.  18
    UnParadoxical Hobbes.Deborah Baumgold - 2009 - Political Theory 37 (5):689-693.
  13.  23
    Hobbesian Absolutism and the Paradox of Modern Contractarianism.Deborah Baumgold - 2009 - European Journal of Political Theory 8 (2):207-228.
    Hobbes's defense of absolutism involves the dual claims that consent is the foundation of legitimate authority and that sovereignty is necessarily absolute. It is a paradoxical combination of claims: If absolute government is the product of choice how can it also be the sole possible constitution? While all of Hobbes's contractarian successors have rejected his preference for absolutism, his dual claims have become commonplace. Since Hobbes, contract thinkers routinely assert that people will choose their preferred constitution and that it is (...)
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  14.  13
    Slavery Discourse Before the Restoration: The Barbary Coast, Justinian's Digest, and Hobbes's Political Theory.Deborah Baumgold - 2010 - History of European Ideas 36 (4):412-418.
    Seventeenth-century natural-law philosophers participated in colonizing and slave-trading companies, yet they discussed slavery as an abstraction. This dispassionate approach is commonly explained with the “distance thesis” that the practice of slavery was at some remove from Northwest Europe. I contest the thesis, with a specific focus on pre-Restoration English discourse and Hobbes's political theory. By laying out the salient context — English experience of Barbary-coast slavery and an inherited neo-Roman intellectual frame — I argue, first, that slavery was hardly a (...)
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  15. Three-Text Edition of Thomas Hobbes's Political Theory: The Elements of Law, de Cive and Leviathan.Deborah Baumgold (ed.) - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    An exciting English-language edition which for the first time presents Thomas Hobbes's masterpiece Leviathan alongside two earlier works, The Elements of Law and De Cive. By arranging the three texts side by side, Baumgold offers readers an enhanced understanding of Hobbes's political theory and addresses an important need within Hobbes scholarship. The parallel presentation highlights substantive connections between the texts and makes it easy to trace the development of Hobbes's thinking. Readers can follow developments both at the 'micro' level of (...)
     
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