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Deborah Boyle [43]Deborah A. Boyle [3]
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Deborah Boyle
College of Charleston
  1.  75
    Mary Shepherd on Mind, Soul, and Self.Deborah Boyle - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):93-112.
    the philosophical writings ofx Lady Mary Shepherd were apparently well regarded in her own time, but dropped out of view in the mid-nineteenth century.1 Some historians of philosophy have recently begun attending to the distinctive arguments in Shepherd's two books, but the secondary literature that exists so far has largely focused on her critiques of Hume and Berkeley. However, many other themes and arguments in Shepherd's writings have not yet been explored. This paper takes up one such issue, what Shepherd (...)
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  2. Margaret Cavendish on Perception, Self‐Knowledge, and Probable Opinion.Deborah Boyle - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (7):438-450.
    Scholarly interest in Margaret Cavendish's philosophical views has steadily increased over the past decade, but her epistemology has received little attention, and no consensus has emerged; Cavendish has been characterized as a skeptic, as a rationalist, as presenting an alternative epistemology to both rationalism and empiricism, and even as presenting no clear theory of knowledge at all. This paper concludes that Cavendish was only a modest skeptic, for she believed that humans can achieve knowledge through sensitive and rational perception as (...)
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  3.  2
    The Well-Ordered Universe: The Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish.Deborah Boyle - 2017 - Oup Usa.
    The Well-Ordered Universe argues that Cavendish's natural philosophy, social and political philosophy, and medical theory share an underlying concern with order. This reveals interesting connections among Cavendish's natural philosophy and her views on gender, animals and the environment, and human health, and explains her commitment to monarchy and social hierarchy.
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  4.  61
    Expanding the Canon of Scottish Philosophy: The Case for Adding Lady Mary Shepherd.Deborah Boyle - 2017 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 15 (3):275-293.
    Lady Mary Shepherd argued for distinctive accounts of causation, perception, and knowledge of an external world and God. However, her work, engaging with Berkeley and Hume but written after Kant, does not fit the standard periodisation of early modern philosophy presupposed by many philosophy courses, textbooks, and conferences. This paper argues that Shepherd should be added to the canon as a Scottish philosopher. The practical reason for doing so is that it would give Shepherd a disciplinary home, opening up additional (...)
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  5. Margaret Cavendish on Gender, Nature, and Freedom.Deborah Boyle - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (3):516-532.
    Some scholars have argued that Margaret Cavendish was ambivalent about women's roles and capabilities, for she seems sometimes to hold that women are naturally inferior to men, but sometimes that this inferiority is due to inferior education. I argue that attention to Cavendish's natural philosophy can illuminate her views on gender. In section II I consider the implications of Cavendish's natural philosophy for her views on male and female nature, arguing that Cavendish thought that such natures were not fixed. However, (...)
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  6. Hume on Animal Reason.Deborah Boyle - 2003 - Hume Studies 29 (1):3-28.
    In both the _Treatise and the first _Enquiry, Hume offers an argument from analogy comparing how humans and animals make causal inferences. Yet in these and other texts, he suggests that there are certain differences between human and animal reasoning. This paper discusses Hume's argument from analogy, and examines how Hume can argue for differences in human and animal reasoning without having to attribute to either a special capacity that the other lacks. Hume's empiricism and his claims about sympathy also (...)
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  7.  68
    The Senses and the History of Philosophy.Brian Glenney, José Filipe Silva, Jana Rosker, Susan Blake, Stephen H. Phillips, Katerina Ierodiakonou, Anna Marmodoro, Lukas Licka, Han Thomas Adriaenssen, Chris Meyns, Janet Levin, James Van Cleve, Deborah Boyle, Michael Madary, Josefa Toribio, Gabriele Ferretti, Clare Batty & Mark Paterson (eds.) - 2019 - New York, USA: Routledge.
    The study of perception and the role of the senses have recently risen to prominence in philosophy and are now a major area of study and research. However, the philosophical history of the senses remains a relatively neglected subject. Moving beyond the current philosophical canon, this outstanding collection offers a wide-ranging and diverse philosophical exploration of the senses, from the classical period to the present day. Written by a team of international contributors, it is divided into six parts: -/- Perception (...)
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  8.  52
    Descartes on Innate Ideas.Deborah Boyle - 2000 - Modern Schoolman 78 (1):35-51.
  9.  60
    Margaret Cavendish.Deborah Boyle - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 60 (-1):63-65.
  10.  47
    Fame, Virtue, and Government: Margaret Cavendish on Ethics and Politics.Deborah Boyle - 2006 - Journal of the History of Ideas 67 (2):251-289.
  11.  33
    The Ways of the Wise: Hume’s Rules of Causal Reasoning.Deborah Boyle - 2012 - Hume Studies 38 (2):157-182.
    In Hume’s own day, and for nearly two hundred years after that, readers interested in his account of causal reasoning tended to focus on the skeptical implications of that account. For example, in his 1757 View of the Principal Deistical Writers of the Last and Present Century, John Leland characterized Hume as “endeavouring to destroy all reasoning, from causes to effects, or from effects to causes.”1 According to this sort of reading, as Louis Loeb describes it, “there is equal justification (...)
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  12.  79
    Descartes' Natural Light Reconsidered.Deborah Boyle - 1999 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (4):601-612.
  13.  42
    Mary Shepherd and the Meaning of ‘Life’.Deborah Boyle - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 29 (2):208-225.
    In the final chapters of her 1824 Essay upon the Relation of Cause and Effect, Lady Mary Shepherd considers what it means for an organism to be alive. The physician William Lawrence had...
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  14.  20
    Editorial Announcements.Deborah Boyle - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):6-6.
    Each year the JHP awards an Article Prize to an article published in the previous year's volume, and a Book Prize to a book published in the previous year that deserves special recognition for its contribution to the history of Western philosophy. For the Book Prize, publishers may nominate books by submitting a hard copy to the Book Review Editor for consideration. The nomination and book must be received by January 1 following the year for which the prize is to (...)
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  15.  23
    The Cambridge Companion to the Scottish Enlightenment, 2nd Ed.: Edited by Alexander Broadie and Craig Smith, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2019, Pp. Xvi + 375, £18.00 (Pb), ISBN: 9781108430784. [REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 29 (1):188-191.
    The second edition of The Cambridge Companion to the Scottish Enlightenment has the same goal as the first edition : to describe “the historical circumstances”, the “leading idea...
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  16.  12
    Elizabeth Hamilton’s Memoirs of Modern Philosophers as a Philosophical Text.Deborah Boyle - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 29 (6):1072-1098.
    ABSTRACT Elizabeth Hamilton has not so far been considered a philosopher, probably because she wrote novels and tracts on education rather than philosophical treatises. This paper argues that Hamilton’s novel Memoirs of Modern Philosophers should be read as a philosophical text, both for its close engagement with William Godwin’s moral theory and for what it suggests about Hamilton’s own moral theory and moral psychology. Studies of Memoirs have so far either characterized it as merely satire of Godwin, or, if they (...)
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  17.  12
    The Rise and Fall of Scottish Common Sense Realism by Douglas McDermid. [REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2021 - Hume Studies 43 (2):107-109.
    This rich and interesting book tells the story of the development and ultimate disappearance over the course of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries of a central theme in Scottish philosophy: common sense realism. Taking Thomas Reid's version of common sense realism as the paradigmatic form, McDermid shows how Reid's views had their roots in Lord Kames's account of perceptual realism, how Dugald Stewart and Sir William Hamilton defended and modified Reid's view, and how James Ferrier systematically repudiated both Reid's appeal (...)
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  18.  27
    Snapshot: Lady Mary Shepherd.Deborah Boyle - 2020 - The Philosophers' Magazine 89:55-59.
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  19.  23
    A Mistaken Attribution to Lady Mary Shepherd.Deborah Boyle - 2020 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 2 (1):5.
    In addition to the 1824 and 1827 books known to have been written by Lady Mary Shepherd, another philosophical treatise, published in 1819, has sometimes been attributed to her. While evidence for this attribution has so far been inconclusive, this paper provides reasons for thinking that Shepherd was not, in fact, the author of this book. New external evidence is provided to show that the author was James Milne, an Edinburgh architect and engineer.
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  20.  61
    Hume Studies Referees, 2003–2004.Kate Abramson, Larry Arnhart, Carla Bagnoli, Martin Bell, Theodore Benditt, Christopher Berry, Deborah Boyle, John Bricke, Justin Broackes & Janet Broughton - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):443-445.
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  21. Descartes on Innate Ideas.Deborah Boyle - 2009 - London, UK: Continuum.
    The concept of innateness is central to Descartes's epistemology; the Meditations display a new, non-Aristotelian method of acquiring knowledge by attending properly to our innate ideas. Yet understanding Descartes's conception of innate ideas is not an easy task, and some commentators have concluded that Descartes held several distinct and unrelated conceptions of innateness. In Descartes on Innate Ideas, Deborah Boyle argues that Descartes's remarks on innate ideas in fact form a unified account. Addressing the further question of how Descartes thinks (...)
     
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  22.  23
    The Philosophy of Mary Astell: An Early Modern Theory of Virtue, by Jacqueline Broad: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, Pp. Vi + 205, US$70. [REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (3):606-609.
  23.  3
    Elizabeth Hamilton on Sympathy and the Selfish Principle.Deborah Boyle - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (3):219-241.
    In A Series of Popular Essays, Scottish philosopher Elizabeth Hamilton identifies two ‘principles’ in the human mind: sympathy and the selfish principle. While sharing Adam Smith's understanding of sympathy as a capacity for fellow-feeling, Hamilton also criticizes Smith's account of sympathy as involving the imagination. Even more important for Hamilton is the selfish principle, a ‘propensity to expand or enlarge the idea of self’ that she distinguishes from both selfishness and self-love. Counteracting the selfish principle requires cultivating sympathy and benevolent (...)
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  24. Hume and Animal Ethics.Deborah Boyle - 2019 - In Angela Michelle Coventry & Alex Sager (eds.), The Humean Mind. Routledge.
     
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  25. Janet Broughton, Descartes's Method of Doubt[REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2003 - Philosophy in Review 23:3-5.
     
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  26.  1
    Lady Mary Shepherd: Selected Writings.Deborah Boyle - 2018 - Exeter, UK: Imprint Academic.
    The philosophical writings of Lady Mary Shepherd (1777–1847) reveal an astute and lively intellect. In An Essay upon the Relation of Cause and Effect (1824) and Essays on the Perception of an External Universe, and Other Subjects Connected with the Doctrine of Causation (1827), Shepherd engaged critically with the views of Hume, Berkeley, Reid, Stewart, de Condillac, and others, but she also presented an original and carefully argued philosophical system of her own. Highly regarded in her day, Shepherd's work faded (...)
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  27.  1
    Mary Shepherd: A Guide.Deborah A. Boyle - 2023 - New York, NY, United States of America: Oxford University Press.
    This guide leads readers systematically through the arguments of Mary Shepherd's two books. Chapters 1-4 cover the arguments in the Essay Upon the Relation of Cause and Effect (1824), where Shepherd argues that causal principles can be known by reason to be necessary truths and that causal inferences can be rationally justified. Shepherd's primary target in this work is Hume, but she also addresses the views of Thomas Brown and William Lawrence. Shepherd considered her second book, Essays on the Perception (...)
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  28. Nancy J. Hirschmann and Kirstie M. McClure, Eds., Feminist Interpretations of John Locke Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2009 - Philosophy in Review 29 (6):418-421.
  29.  1
    Philosophical Letters, Abridged.Deborah Boyle (ed.) - 2021 - Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company.
    "Margaret Cavendish is a fascinating figure who is getting increasing attention by historians of philosophy these days, and for good reason.... She’s an interesting advocate of a vitalist tradition emphasizing the inherent activity of matter, as well as its inherent perceptive faculties. She’s also the perfect character to open students up to a different seventeenth century, and a different cast of philosophical characters. This is an ideal book to use in the classroom. The _Philosophical Letters_ gives us Cavendish’s view of (...)
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  30. The Treasure House of the Mind: Descartes' Conception of Innate Ideas.Deborah A. Boyle - 1999 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    Descartes is often accused of lacking a coherent conception of innate ideas. I argue that Descartes' remarks on innate ideas actually form a unified account. "Innate idea" is triply ambiguous, but its three meanings are interdependent. "Innate idea" can mean an act of perceiving; that which is perceived; or a faculty, capacity, or disposition to have certain ideas. An innate idea qua object of thought is some thing existing objectively , which we have a capacity to perceive, but which we (...)
     
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  31.  37
    Hume Studies Referees, 2003–2004.Larry Arnhart, Carla Bagnoli, Christopher Berry, Deborah Boyle, Janet Broughton, Stephen Buckle, Dario Castiglione, Kenneth Clatterbaugh, Phillip D. Cummins & Daniel Flage - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):443-445.
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  32.  35
    Hume Studies Referees, 2006–2007.Margaret Atherton, Tom Beauchamp, Deborah Boyle, Emily Carson, Dorothy Coleman, Angela Coventry, Shelagh Crooks, Remy Debes, Georges Dicker & Paul Draper - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (2):385-387.
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  33.  31
    Hume Studies Referees, 2007–2008.Donald Ainslie, Carla Bagnoli, Donald Baxter, Tom Beauchamp, Helen Beebee, Martin Bell, Deborah Boyle, John Bricke, Deborah Brown & Dorothy Coleman - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):323-324.
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  34.  21
    Descartes’s Tests for (Animal) Mind.Gerald J. Massey & Deborah A. Boyle - 1999 - Philosophical Topics 27 (1):87-146.
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  35.  11
    The Essential Leviathan: A Modernized Edition. [REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2019 - Teaching Philosophy 42 (3):300-304.
  36. Spontaneous and Sexual Generation in Conway's Principles.Deborah Boyle - 2006 - In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
  37.  26
    Hume Studies Referees, 2006–2007.Abraham Anderson, Margaret Atherton, Annette Baier, Tom Beauchamp, Helen Beebee, Martin Bell, Lorraine Besser-Jones, Richard Bett, Mark Box & Deborah Boyle - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (2):385-387.
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  38.  25
    Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom From Domination - by Patricia Springborg. [REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2007 - Philosophical Books 48 (4):359-360.
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  39. Margaret Cavendish's Nonfeminist Natural Philosophy.Deborah Boyle - 2004 - Configurations 12 (2):195–227.
    Several recent papers and books have argued that Cavendish's work in natural philosophy foreshadows some twentieth-century feminist philosophers' critiques of epistemology and science. These readings fall into three groups: arguments that Cavendish's early atomistic poems present an alternative, female way of knowing; arguments that such an alternative epistemology occurs in Cavendish's _Blazing World_; and arguments that her ontology was driven by feminist concerns for the implications of atomism and mechanism. Such interpretations, however, are in need of reassessment. This paper argues (...)
     
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  40.  14
    William James's Ethical Symphony.Deborah Boyle - 1998 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 34 (4):977 - 1003.
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  41.  9
    Lisa T. Sarasohn. The Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish: Reason and Fancy During the Scientific Revolution. Xi + 251 Pp., Index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010. $75. [REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2011 - Isis 102 (2):360-361.
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  42.  10
    Moira Gatens, Ed., Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2010 - Philosophy in Review 30 (5):341-344.
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  43. William Lad Sessions, Reading Hume's Dialogues: A Veneration for True Religion. [REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2003 - Philosophy in Review 23 (3):220-222.
  44. Janet Broughton, Descartes's Method of Doubt Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2003 - Philosophy in Review 23 (1):3-5.
     
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  45.  7
    The Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish: Reason and Fancy During the Scientific Revolution. [REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2011 - Isis 102:360-361.
  46.  7
    David Cunning , Argument and Persuasion in Descartes' Meditations . Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Deborah Boyle - 2011 - Philosophy in Review 31 (5):321-323.
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